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Roasted Cauliflower with Gremolata Breadcrumbs

October 15, 2010 • 9 Comments

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See A&M make TheThinChef's simple dinner party stunner Roasted Cauliflower with Gremolata Breadcrumbs. Amanda gives us a history lesson on gremolata and Merrill shows off a simple but brilliant trick for floretting cauliflower that minimizes wayward crumbles. (If 'floret' wasn't a verb before, it is now!)

This week's videos were once again shot and edited by filmmaker Elena Parker.

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Comments (9)

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almost 4 years ago Rhonda35

Amanda -
Is the frying pan you are using to cook the breadcrumbs the pan I came home with from college - I think it was left in my apt by a roommate? It has the same patina and handle I remember and I was just wondering. Would be funny if that old pan was still around.

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almost 4 years ago OldGrayMare

Had this tonight with a slight twist - had only about 2/3 of one head of cauliflower, so added a box of fresh brussel sprouts to the mix.....it was deeeeelish! I could eat that gremolata with a spoon! My husband is definitely benefitting from my experimentation.....and sends his regards to the authors of this recipe!! Think I will do this for Thanksgiving - and add turnips, potatoes and carrots to the roasting mix.

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about 4 years ago magdance

The gremolata looks like a great variation on the garlic-and-butter bread crumbs called broeseln my Austrian husband always liked with cauliflower. Re cutting up cauliflower: I learned long ago from Julia Child that the core of cauliflower is tender if you peel it, much like broccoli stems, so I always include it with the prettier florets.

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about 4 years ago vagabond1

To floret, a marvelous twist in the ever-changing culinary lexicon! And the recipe is one to be repeated through this choufleur season....simply delish...

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about 4 years ago cheese1227

Kind of weird that viewing this video jumps me to the Vimeo site which is really, really spotty. There, the video delivery stops literally every 5 seconds to seeminlyg cue the next frames. It's really tough to watch.

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about 4 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Sometimes if you just pause the video for 30 seconds or a minute right after you start the first run, it allows the "buffering" to progress, and that cures the stopping . . . . ;o)

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about 4 years ago Crispy

Pause the video and walk away for a few minutes so it has a chance to load. When you return, hit play and should play without pausing :)

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about 4 years ago Crispy

Sorry, didn't see Antonia James post...

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about 4 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Really like the tip on cutting out the core like a cabbage. I've always cut down the short stems and then pulled, as suggested, when making the fleurettes, but typically have started by cutting out the heavy core in a large circular motion, which is rather imprecise. I like this new way much better!! Also, here's my tip for not putting on too much oil. I use a small cruet, the kind you get at the restaurant supply store, with a screw-on tip that has a single hole on the top. This allows you to shake a smaller, easily controlled amount. I have about a dozen of those cruets on a small lazy Susan in a cabinet nearby, for all my vinegars, olive/sesame oils, tamari, etc. -- any liquid I regularly sprinkle on while cooking or before serving. ;o)