Kitchen Confidence

How to Carve a Chicken (or Turkey)

By • November 7, 2012 • 2 Comments

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Inspired by conversations on the FOOD52 Hotline, we're sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun. Today, Amanda and Merrill show us how to carve a chicken.

A whole chicken ready to carve can be daunting, and that's quite understandable -- with so many bones and joints, it can be hard to know where to start.

Watch Amanda and Merrill carve a chicken, and get yourself ready to chop away at another certain bird for a certain upcoming holiday -- maybe you'll even get ambitious and dry-brine your turkey.

This video was shot by Kyle Orosz. Photos by James Ransom.

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Tags: Kitchen Confidence, chicken, carving, poultry, turkey, Thanksgiving, holiday, how-to & diy

Comments (2)

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12 months ago Chef Carlos

All I can say is well done ladies, I actually learned a few things, such as the oyster - I'll try this the next time I make Julia's chicken, or the recently departed Judy Rodgers' Zuni Chicken - here's the recipe, a much try: http://www.foodandwine...

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about 1 year ago Edward Codina

When I carve my roasted chicken or turkey, I bring out a big platter which I then line with romaine/any lettuce/kale/beet leaves we would normally remove or throw out as being too tough. This creates a "garden bed" which places the chicken right back in the freshness of the outdoors for the presentation. Next, after the bird is carved and carefully sliced as was done in your video, I re-arrange all the pieces back to literally "recompose the bird" on the platter just as if it were whole only now it is displayed in all its deliciousness and visual appeal (the little bits and pieces you dug out of the carcass go underneath the recomposed breast meat). I find that this makes it easier for the guests to choose what they like more easily while giving the bird all the glorious respect it truly deserves!