Small Batch

Making Nut Milks at Home

By • February 22, 2013 • 109 Comments

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Every week, a DIY expert spares us a trip to the grocery store and shows us how to make small batches of great foods at home.

Today, AntoniaJames talks homemade nut milks. After reading her step-by-step instructions and easy, adaptable recipe, you'll never go back to the box again.

milk

If its ubiquitous presence on grocery store shelves is any indication, almond milk has taken the country by storm. I suppose this comes as no surprise, given the increasing populations of vegans, people with allergies and intolerances to dairy products, and others looking for a light, nutritious alternative to milk and cream. But the stuff in cartons contains preservatives and stabilizers that give it an odd aftertaste, and it often develops an unappealing, gummy consistency.

Fortunately, making nut milks at home isn’t hard. Plus, by making your own, you can control the quantity, sweetness, and thickness of the milk, and you can customize the flavor by adding vanilla, citrus zest, and spices. Not to mention that, like anything else, homemade tastes so much better!

almonds

I’ve found that nut milks provide more than just a good alternative to dairy. Often, they’re the better ingredient. For example, say you want to serve a creamy soup like Butternut Squash Soup with Sherry or Roasted Celery Soup, but don’t want to fill your guests up before the main event. Substituting a thick almond or cashew milk for the cows’ milk and cream lets you lighten these soups without sacrificing their luscious consistency. Additionally, cashew or almond milk (with a squeeze of lime added right before serving) magically improves any dal or curry. And what better way to get true almond and vanilla flavors into steel cut oats or granola than to use a milk made just of almonds, vanilla bean, and water?

Here’s how to make your own nut milks and creams:

First, measure and soak the nuts in about twice their volume of water. Let them sit at least overnight or (even better) for 24 hours.

pour

Drain and put them in a blender with some fresh filtered water and any sweeteners, spices, and flavorings you want. Add a piece of sliced vanilla bean for the strongest vanilla flavor.

drain

Blend on high speed for about 3 minutes. (You don’t need a Vitamix for this; a regular blender with a good motor will do!)

If you want a thicker nut milk, check for sweetness and flavoring ingredients, add more if necessary, and blend for another minute or so.

blend

If you prefer the consistency of regular whole cows’ milk, add more water and blend for another full minute. Taste, add whatever ingredients need a boost, and then blend for another 30 seconds.

If you’ve added a vanilla bean for flavor, let the milk sit for about an hour, then blend it again for 10 – 15 seconds before straining.

muslin

If you haven't used a vanilla bean in your milk, strain it immediately into a sieve or colander lined with several layers of regular cheesecloth, or with the more tightly woven cheesecloth known as butter muslin or "90 muslin". You can get the latter from cheesemaking suppliers and at some craft and fabric stores.

pour

You may need to push some of the pulp aside after about 10 minutes to make room for pouring more of the nut milk through. 

After about 20 minutes – when the pulp is still moist but no milk is dripping through the strainer -- draw up the edges of the butter muslin and carefully twist them together at the top. Squeeze the pulp gently to extract the milk, taking care not to let the pulp itself squeeze out.

pulp

Put the milk into a covered jar or other glass container and refrigerate. Nut milks tend to separate, so I put mine in jars or tightly lidded pitchers that I can shake. A brisk stir with a spoon also works.

pour

Cashews and pistachios get so soft and creamy after soaking that they generally don’t need to be strained. I scrape down the sides after 3 minutes and then blend them for an extra minute before pouring the milk into a clean jar or covered glass pitcher and refrigerating.

Be sure to rinse your cheesecloth in cold, filtered water so that you can reuse it. You’ll certainly want to, once you’ve tried this recipe.

bottle

Homemade Almond Milk

1 cup raw almonds
Filtered water: 2 cups for soaking the nuts, plus 3 ½ cups for blending
3 to 4 pitted dates, or 1 tablespoon honey or maple syrup (optional, to taste)

Save and print the recipe here.

For a vanilla-infused version, click here.

Looking for more uses for your nut milk?

• Drizzle lightly sweetened thick almond milk over fruit tarts, crisps and cobblers. Use it to lighten up your breakfast bread puddings and French toast, or in fun vegan puddings like this one.

• For a new spin on roasted butternut squash, mash it with a quarter cup or more of thick cashew or almond milk, salt, and a big pinch of recently-ground garam masala for an easy but elegant winter side dish.

• Blended with a few handfuls of berries, vanilla almond milk makes an irresistible smoothie.

Photos by James Ransom

Tags: small batch, nut milks, almond milk, cashew milk, nuts, vegan, drinks, DIY, special diets, how-to & diy

Comments (109)

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10 days ago diana

I had recommended making homemade nut milk to a friend whose child has a very severe allergy to casein, among other things in dairy. They live in a small town in central Greece and she was buying soy milk which was available in a canned stabilized version. That bothered me a bit because this child was not able to drink something fresh in terms of a milk product. So it turned out that they lived on a family farm that happened to have a variety of nut trees. Greece is full of almond and walnut trees. So we found out how to make the milk and it has pretty much saved the situation. :)

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9 days ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

That's wonderful to hear. Thank you for letting me know. ;o)

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about 1 year ago cindy_perkins_marlow

I love that 'what goes around, comes around.' When I discovered my daughter's dairy allergy in 1976, I began making my own almond milk from reading Jethro Kloss's book 'Back to Eden.'

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about 1 year ago Dorry Forrester

How much cocoa would I need to make a chocolate version. I love chocolate almond milk and have bought it many times, but would love to make it myself and hopefully save money.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

I'd make a chocolate syrup by putting a teaspoon or so of cocoa per cup of milk in a cup with perhaps 2 teaspoons of boiling water and a pinch of sugar, depending on how sweet you like your cocoa. Melt the chocolate and stir to dissolve the sugar. Then add the almond milk. If that's not chocolaty enough, make more syrup. Good idea! ;o)

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about 1 year ago Dorry Forrester

Thanks so much! I will try that!
I am making almond milk tonight when I get home from work. I have had the almonds soaking in water for nearly 24 hours now.
Whenever I have that drained and exhausted feeling, chocolate almond milk seems to help perk me up again and give me a second wind.
Thank you for your inspiration! I cannot wait to get home and get my hands on the soaked almonds and the blender!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Great! I'm thinking you might want to start with a tablespoon of cocoa + the same of hot water (plus sugar to taste) per cup, not knowing how rich your chocolate is . . . you could add a tablespoon of syrup, taste, and add more if you want. Sounds so tasty and yes, I could use a little pick-me-up just like that, right about now! ;o)

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about 1 year ago Dorry Forrester

I'll let you know how it turns out!

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about 1 year ago tenuta melagrana

Have you made soy milk? If so, any tricks to it?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Actually, I have not. That would be a great question for the FOOD52 Hotline! ;o)

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about 1 year ago Lauren Ritter

also for longer freshness fill your bottles to the brim. Less exposure to air longer self life.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thanks, Lauren! ;o)

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about 1 year ago Lauren Ritter

I have worked intensively with nutmilks. I found they last much longer if the nuts are soaked in the fridge.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Lauren, thank you so much for this post! I had no idea. I'll keep that in mind next time. ;o)

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about 1 year ago phyllis segura

There is a good book on this topic: Nut Milks by Candia Lea Cole, copyrighted 1990. What she does is use a spice mill to grind the nuts first. She also recommends adding ground flax to give some texture and of course added nutritional value. She never recommended soaking the nuts but it really is a good idea. She also adds Lecithin granules (need to be refrigerated). The Pine Nut Milk has got to be delicious but expensive. There are also recipes for Pumpkin seed, Sesame seed, and Sunflower seed milks. I also milk Poppy seeds!

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about 1 year ago Panfusine

Poppy seed paste is often used in Bengali cuisine for curries that call for a rich texture, love the creamy, buttery texture it yields. Do you use the white or the black poppy seeds?

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about 1 year ago phyllis segura

I use the black poppy seeds which produces a whitish milk. The white ones are traditionally used for pastries though I don't see why they would not work as well. Essentially any seed can be milked, or any nut. Was joking around the other day with some friends about how some of the economic problems in Afghanistan could be solved if they used the poppy seeds to make milk, seeing as how popular all the non-dairy milks are here and elsewhere!

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about 1 year ago Panfusine

you know.. you may have a great germ of a start-up idea there!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thank you, phyllis. I'll need to run that book down. It sounds so interesting! ;o)

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about 1 year ago phyllis segura

I made sunflower milk today with some almonds added. Put in some ground flax seeds and lecithin. I soaked too many and had to run it through the blender several times. It really only takes about 1/3 cup of seeds/nuts to about 3-1/2-4 cups water and I soaked 1 cup of seeds. Gulp. Now I'm trying to figure out what to do with the pulp.

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about 1 year ago Panfusine

add the pulp to a veggie burger mix of cooked quinoa,refried beans, panko & seasonings.

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about 1 year ago phyllis segura

Maybe. That sounds rather heavy. I'd add more vegetables if I were to do that. Skip the panko though as they all have additives. Panko is great though for a coating but not inside mixtures, for that, use breadcrumbs. The great thing about panko is the crispiness that it creates.

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about 1 year ago Panfusine

sorry, I shd have clarified.. yes the Panko is just for coating the surfaces!

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about 1 year ago sophiea

AntoniaJames, I love all your contributions to Food52!!!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Sophiea, you are too kind. Love your blog, by the way! Sending the link now to my sister, also a painter and fabulous, SallyCan (whose handsome food-subject still life paintings decorate my law offices!). ;o)

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about 1 year ago phyllis segura

Good direction. You can also use the ground and strained nut meats a second time as all the juice is not yet out of them. Adding sweeteners is not always necessary but sometimes a thickener makes for a better mouth feel. You can research the ones you might like. I used to use soy lecithin but don't recommend it any longer.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thanks so much, phyllis! ;o)

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about 1 year ago Lkw1080

I found my answer below! Thanks!

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about 1 year ago Lkw1080

Thanks so much! I am soaking both almonds and cashews right now to give this a try! Can't wait! How long will it keep in the fridge?

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about 1 year ago boringmama

This looks wonderful. May I ask you where you got your milk jar-how much it holds and does it seal ? I noticed a red rubber seal. Thanks so much

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about 1 year ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Senior Editor of Food52

Hi there -- I believe we used this Weck Preserving Juice Jar, which holds 1062ml or about 36 fluid ounces: http://www.amazon.com/BlissHome...

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about 1 year ago boringmama

May I ask where you got your cute jar and it looks like it has a lid that seals ? Or how does it attach? I noticed the red rubber ring. I'd love to get a couple--oh and how much does it hold? Thanks so much !

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about 1 year ago Janet L Smith

Can you make coconut Milk about the same way?

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about 1 year ago Panfusine

For coconut milk, I'd suggest getting the grated frozen coconut you get in Indian grocery stores and then proceed to blend them with warm/hot water to extract the milk. cold water tends to freeze the coconut oil, leaving messy globules about ( unless of course you want to buy a whole coconut, break i, & t scrape out the meat), The dessicated coconut from the shelves do not work that well.

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about 1 year ago luvcookbooks

Meg is a trusted home cook.

AJ, you continually amaze and inspire me! Thanks!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

luvcookbooks, you're too nice. Thank YOU!! ;o)

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about 1 year ago Dina Moore-Tzouris

thank you! what a revelation! so, so, so much more delicious than anything from a box. almondy perfection. I have a vitamin, so i used it, following same directions. drained with a nut milk bag. could not be easier! never going back!

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about 1 year ago Dina Moore-Tzouris

vitamix...silly autocorrect!

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about 1 year ago megaret

Has anyone tried making this in a large food processor? I would think it would work, but I've substituted it for a blender in some other recipes and things don't always come out quite right.

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about 1 year ago sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

I make mine in my large cuisinart and it works just fine, I make a pretty large quantity and my blender is pretty old so I think the results are probably better in my processor, if I had a vitamix I would use that for sure but my processor does the job just fine,

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about 1 year ago megaret

Great to know, thank you!

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about 1 year ago sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

I make it every week and have always used my food processor thinking my old blender would not work as good, tonight I made in the blender and it did do a better job on the almonds than my processor. Both work but the almonds were chopped finer probably extracting more of the milk with the processor.

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about 1 year ago Panfusine

LOVE THIS!! thanks Antoniajames

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thank YOU, panfusine! I've stirred almond milk into more than one of your beautiful recipes. ;o)

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about 1 year ago BlueKaleRoad

This is a terrific post! Homemade nut milk is so much better than store-bought. I usually make almond, but just picked up cashews to try. Great tip that they don't need to be strained, and now I'll add pistachios to my shopping list. Thank you for sharing!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thanks, BKR! I find that with the cashew milk and pistachio milk, it's a good idea to test it for consistency before pouring it out of the blender. Some nuts are harder (drier, I guess) than others, so they soak the water up at different rates. I've been known to blend for an extra minute or so when making milks that are not strained. Also, it's important to scrape down the side of the blender to get the little bits into the mix. ;o)

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about 1 year ago BlueKaleRoad

Thanks for that additional tip, AJ!

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about 1 year ago bobpirtle

I tried using cheesecloth but had better luck using a nut milk bag I bought. They are available on line. I purchased from purejoyplanet.com.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thanks, bobpirtle. That's very helpful! ;o)

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about 1 year ago DeenyS

Thanks for that tip, just ordered one. I've been wanting to make sesame milk.

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about 1 year ago LaH2

Hi, do you soak them at room temperature or in the refrigerator? Thanks!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

I soak them out on the counter. Granted, my kitchen is always rather cool, as I live close to the San Francisco Bay. If I lived in a place that were really warm, I might soak them for at least part of the time in the fridge. I don't think it makes any difference to how the almond milk tastes. ;o)

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about 1 year ago Patrisha

Wonderful article. I've been wanting to make my own nut mild and am saving this recipe. Thank you!

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about 1 year ago Patrisha

Ooops...I mean't milk.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

You're welcome! I hope you do try it. ;o)

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about 1 year ago KathieProctor

I love almond milk and look forward to trying your recipe. Just wondering if you can use almond milk in any recipe that calls for milk. I think I would try not straining it and see if I like it that way.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

I would say yes with one big exception, and that is in certain baked goods and pudding or custard type desserts, where you need those milk proteins and that type of fat for best results. But I have don't much experimenting to know what works and what doesn't. Also, about not straining -- almond milk, even when made with almonds that have had a good soak, tends to be rather gritty. Unstrained milk works just fine in a curry or stirred into steel cut oats, or other dishes where the rough texture does not matter. I usually make a batch for multiple uses, including (without exception), stirring into my tea. If you're not going to strain, you can also make a much thicker cream, though (I've found, at least), even extra blending never quite gets rid of the grittiness. ;o)

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about 1 year ago Nutbutter

How long will the milk keep in the refrigerator? Thank you!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

About 3-4 days. Put it in the coldest part of your fridge, immediately, and don't worry if it separates - just give it a good shake before using. Also, I sometimes put it in the freezer, and then blend it for a minute or so, once it's defrosted. It won't be as flavorful, and even after blending will seem thinner than it was before you froze it, but it will do just fine for smoothies, finishing soups and dals, etc. ;o)

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about 1 year ago Queen of Quinoa

Great post! I just got a new blender and I've been meaning to make my own nut milk. Can't wait to give this a try.

I'm wondering...how long to homemade nut milks keep for?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thanks, Q of Q!! Please see my answer to the comment directly above this one. ;o)

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about 1 year ago Lisa Cocco

Do you have to use cheesecloth? I've just been peeling the almonds and straining the milk.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

If that works for you, great! I've never tried it with skinless almonds, though now, I'm interested in trying it (although I don't have a good source of blanched almonds, and I haven't the patience to do it myself). Thanks so much for letting us know. ;o)

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about 1 year ago david lee

hi, when i make soy milk, i give the okara to my dog, who is crazy about it. i could do the same with the almond milk, but i never strain it, i leave the pulp in. is it only for 'cosmetic' reasons that you strain it?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

david lee, I strain almond milk because it's always a bit gritty when it's not strained . . . but there's no reason not to leave it unstrained, if you like it that way. Thanks! ;o)

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about 1 year ago christine eleanor

redcrow
What timing! I just bought some almond milk and some rice milk to try for the first time. I decided that this was an OK route to take me away from diary milk and now I can make my own. Thank you.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Almond milk is a fabulous alternative to dairy, for so many reasons. There's a lot out there on the internet about how the vitamins and minerals in it are easily absorbed and therefore used efficiently by the body, making it a great choice. And it tastes great! I hope you do try making your own. ;o)

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about 1 year ago bobbie joh

Your directions say to soak for up to 24 hours, but I have heard cashews cannot be soaked more than 8 hours...?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

That's an interesting point. I've read that if you soak them for more than 12 hours they can taste bitter, but I've never found that to be the case. That said, cashews are much softer than almonds, so they really don't need more than 12 hours anyway. ;o)

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about 1 year ago bobbie joh

thanks

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about 1 year ago JulieBee

I just forwarded this link to my dermatologist who is always pushing me away from dairy to nut milks. She recently gave me a dissertation on how to make my own nut milks, so this info is fortuitous as I could not remember how she told me to do it, just that I should!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Wow, thank you! ;o)

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about 1 year ago Kukla

Now when we have an easy to follow and as always precise recipe from AntoniaJames, you can also add any Nut milk, especially with vanilla, to your cup of tea or coffee.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thank you, Kukla, for your kind words. As always, they are much appreciated. And yes, I use my almond milk -- vanilla or plain -- in tea every day. They're the best. ;o)

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about 1 year ago rynnybit

any use for the nut milk?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Stir it into soups, pureed vegetables, stews, etc. where you'd otherwise use milk, cream or half and half; it makes great smoothies; it's fabulous, especially when you don't dilute it much (e.g., strain after the first blend of 1.5 X water to 1 part raw nuts), drizzled over crisps and cobblers and tarts, instead of cream; use it in French toast, bread puddings and similar casseroles instead of milk or cream; use it to make rice pudding, or to stir into for a bit of extra flavor while eating it; stir into red lentils/dals and curries for a nice smooth finish. ;o)

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about 1 year ago rynnybit

oh my goodness, sorry, I meant the strained nut pulp.

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about 1 year ago ATG117

Great piece. I've been meaning to try this at home. I'm assuming the fat content increases with the homemade version. Anyone have thoughts on that?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

The fat content depends to some extent on the degree of dilution. I suspect that homemade versions do have more fat in them, but I don't know, and can think of no way to test it at home (as opposed to in a lab set up for taking such measurements). You're going to leave some fat in the almonds behind in the pulp. But how much, I don't know. The homemade kind tastes so good, however, that the superior quality does allow you to use less. ;o)

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about 1 year ago Fairmount_market

I always appreciate the precision of your instructions. Thanks for the inspiration!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

You're welcome, and thanks for your kind words . . . but actually, MarianBull, who did an extraordinary job of editing this for me, deserves most of the credit! ;o)

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about 1 year ago jblock

My local health food store has organic cotton nut milk bags. I have been doing this for years and the job is quite a bit speedier when i can pour blender contents into bag and squeeze it by hand. Be careful, fresh almond milk is addictive, and you may find yourself hiding it for yourself in the fridge!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

I've heard about nut milk bags, but have never seen one. And yes, I know how addictive fresh nut milks are! ;o)

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about 1 year ago hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

I love the idea of pistachio milk with a pinch of cardamom! What have you used pistachio milk for?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

hla, I used it in a dairy-free panna cotta, stirred into steel cut oats with sultanas and a light dusting of nutmeg, and made a killer smoothie adding just a frozen banana. And here's a little tip: roasted unsalted pistachios make a great tasting, almost savory milk that works really well in blended masoor dal + vegetables soups. ;o)

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about 1 year ago hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

Any way you'd be willing to post the panna cotta recipe?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

hla, I adapted this one: http://www.tarteletteblog... I made pistachio milk with 2 cups of water to one cup of pistachios, measured before soaking, and had about 1/2 cup of milk left over after making this. (I used just the pistachio milk and not any other "creamer".) I used 1/3 cup demerara sugar, and about 1/4 teaspoon of freshly grated nutmeg, simply because cardamom + nutmeg just taste so great together. I served it with some figs that had been soaking in brandy since September. ;o)

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about 1 year ago susanm

well...who knew?
i am so not a fan of boxed, sweetened nut milks. cant wait to try this. THANKS!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thanks, susanm. I hope you do! ;o)

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about 1 year ago Janet Hoffman

Thanks for the great recipe. I love homemade almond milk but I have a curious thing happen with my raw, organic almonds when I soak them. After about 12 hours something begins growing in the water. It is slimy and cloudy. It doesn't look safe but I rinse the almonds well and soak for another 12 hours. The almond milk doesn't taste bad and I don't get sick. Just wondering if anyone else experiences this and what it might be. Thanks.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

The clouding is perfectly normal. No matter how clean your dry raw almonds appear, there are dust and other residues on them. I just rinse the nuts well after soaking and before blending. I don't worry about it at all. And I've never gotten sick or had any other problems. Great question, though! ;o)

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about 1 year ago thirteenJ

sigh...Darnit...wish I wasn't allergic!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Are you allergic to pepitas? According to Baketress, who commented below, they can be made into milk the same way. I'm thinking they'd be even better for many savory dishes. I can hardly wait to start playing with them. ;o)

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about 1 year ago thirteenJ

Thank you! I can have pepitas (seeds).!! Sounds like just the right milk for a creamy squash soup,too!
Now then, I'm missing out on the entire "cashew cheese" wave, also. Might you think that "pepita cheese" is a possibility?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

I have never tried it, but you could certainly try. Just soak the nuts and blend with as little water as you need to grind them up, adding more and scraping down as necessary. Sounds like a great idea! ;o)

Hilary_sp1

about 1 year ago Hilarybee

Count me in the can't eat most nuts camp, too. I practically live off of pepitas. But I've tried pepita milk and it has come out waxy. Granted, I soaked them but used a juicer. Maybe a blender would help break it up more?

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about 1 year ago healthierkitchen

This is terrific! Can you do anything with the ground nut that you strain out?

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

You can dry out the pulp on a cookie sheet in a slow oven, turning occasionally, until it's totally dry, and use it as you would almond meal. Most of the flavor is spent, however, and I'm rather lazy, so I usually just put it in my food waste bin for composting. I have experimented with making crackers and cookies with it, inspired by these blog posts: http://www.elanaspantry... and http://figgyandsprout.com... with moderate success. I'd like to figure out how to make a cookie like a German "Zimtsterne," but that is, as yet, still in the idea phase. I'll certainly post a recipe here on FOOD52 if I can make it work. Also, FYI, here is a Hotline thread, started by me last year, on this topic: http://tinyurl.com/AlmondPulp... ;o)

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about 1 year ago nabi

Google "pulp almond milk uses"
A couple quick hits:
http://www.edibleperspective...
http://emilylsnelling.hubpages...
www.kaiakitchen.com/almond...

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about 1 year ago Baketress

Nice post!
I would like to add that using raw pepitas the same way is really delicious.
My fave smoothie - pumpkin seed milk, raspberries, and banana.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Pepitas! What a great idea! I've made pistachio milk for use in panna cotta and it was divine. I'm looking forward to trying that smoothie you describe, using blueberries (I have dozens of jars of them in light syrup, as I own 17 prolific bushes.)instead of raspberries. Thanks so much for telling us about it! ;o)

Ozoz_profile

about 1 year ago Kitchen Butterfly

I love nut milks - wonderfully clear instructions and superb photos to boot. I shall not tire of saying so to Mr Ransom.

I love to make a delicious tigernut churro with the nut residue from making horchata!

Wo

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thanks, KB. Never had a tigernut, but did you say, "Churro"?!? I'm in. ;o)

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about 1 year ago Marian Bull

Marian is an editor at Food52.

There are few things more refreshing than an ice cold glass of homemade almond milk. Love the detailed, thorough instructions -- thanks AJ!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

My pleasure, MB! ;o)

Elysetager_060109_125x152

about 1 year ago Elycooks

Wow, who knew! Thanks so much.

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

You're welcome, Elycooks. Hope you try it soon. ;o)

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about 1 year ago sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

This is great, I have been making my own nutmilk but have problems with the straining. I have to find butter muslin. Nut milk is amazing and have been using it instead of cows milk in many recipes, for drinking and it's amazing on homemade granola too!

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about 1 year ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thanks, sdb. If you have a store that sells cheesemaking supplies, they'll have the butter muslin. If you end up buying it at a crafts store, you'll need to wash it two or three times in the washer (I'd use cold water. air dry and then fluff in the dryer for a few minutes to soften it up.) as it may have a sizing on it that makes it stiff and that also, of course, could affect the flavor of the milk. I'd probably just order a packet of butter muslin online, if you don't have a local cheesemaking store. Home brewing stores often sell cheesemaking supplies, too, by the way. That's where I get mine! ;o)