Project Dessert

Homemade Croissants

By • September 21, 2013 • 8 Comments

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Every other Friday, we'll be sharing dessert projects that demand a little extra time and effort. Because weekends are the sweetest part of the week.

Today: Yossy shows us how to make perfectly flaky croissants at home.

Homemade Croissants

There is nothing finer than a warm, buttery pastry on a cool fall morning. So I propose that, this weekend, you tackle classic French croissants at home.

You may think that homemade croissants are too hard or complicated to pull off. While I admit that this recipe takes a bit of time and planning to pull off, I promise you that the reward of fresh homemade croissants is worth every ounce of effort.

Croissants on Food52  Croissants on Food52

There are three main components to this recipe; the preferment, which provides structure and flavor to the finished pastries; the main dough; and the roll-in butter, which is responsible for all of the delicious layers characteristic of a great croissant.

Croissants on Food52

All three parts of these croissants can be made over the course of a day and a half; you can also put them together a little at a time over the course of a few days if that's more your speed. Just be sure to read through the entire recipe at least once before you get started to make sure you allot enough time for the rising and resting times.

Croissants on Food52

Homemade Croissants 

For the Preferment and Dough

6 ?ounces nonfat milk
1 ?tablespoon active dry yeast
6 1/4? ounces all purpose flour
1? tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon active dry yeast
14? ounces whole milk
28 ?ounces all purpose flour
2 1/2 ?ounces sugar
1? tablespoon plus one teaspoon salt
1 ?tablespoon unsalted butter, melted

For the Roll-in Butter and Egg Wash

22? ounces unsalted butter, cool but pliable
2 eggs
2 ?ounces heavy cream or milk
Pinches salt 

See the full recipe (and save and print it) here.

Photos by Yossy Arefi

 

Jump to Comments (8)

Tags: croissants, baking, pastry

Comments (8)

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about 1 year ago Rivka

EERIE - I made croissants for the first time this weekend. Followed Tartine's (9-page!!) recipe to a tee. Came out a bit more gluteny than they should, but otherwise awesome.

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about 1 year ago savorthis

My dad's friend taught a croissant class and sent my dad home with all these plastic contraptions to measure and cut the dough into a rectangle and triangles. I remember helping my dad make those croissants over several days, slathering butter, folding, rolling. The anticipation was torture but they were so good and I have not made them since. It seems like a great project to try with my daughter.

Stringio

about 1 year ago Robin Smith

That's nonfat milk, not nonfat dry milk, right?
My brain doesn't calculate ounces too well, but, for this, it will be worth it.

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about 1 year ago Yossy Arefi

yes, the recipe calls for nonfat milk (not dry, although I used whole milk for both the preferment and the dough and it worked wonderfully.

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about 1 year ago AmyRuth

you may have just stirred the temptation I have suppressed for a while. guess I had better make a plan

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about 1 year ago Panfusine

We have a Baking group called 'We knead to bake' on FaceBook, Croissants was the project for February.. It worth the 3 day process just to savor the end product.

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about 1 year ago vvvanessa

Those are particularly gorgeous croissants. Laminated dough has been on my kitchen to-do list forever, and this definitely gives me a nudge to get to it sooner than later.

Chris_in_oslo

about 1 year ago Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

I know people who have made these Tartine Bakery croissants with great success, and you've inspired me to add it to my list of holiday projects, when there are lots of people around who love both projects and croissants. But why are we calling croissants dessert?