Kitchen Confidence

How to Make Perfect Scrambled Eggs

By • October 16, 2013 • 84 Comments

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Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we're sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun.

Today: Three ways to get your perfect scrambled eggs -- whatever your version of perfection may be.

Scrambled eggs from Food52

Scrambled eggs and toast: sounds like an ascetic breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Sounds plain. Sounds boring. Sounds like something you'd eat in a dark kitchen, alone, standing up, quickly and efficiently with a tiny frown. And, if you're one of those people that's suffered from rubbery-egg, burnt-egg, or dry-and-crumbly-egg syndrome, it sounds simply unappealing.

But scrambled eggs, when done right, can one of the most glorious, indulgent, and straight-up sexy meals of all time. You could make them for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, each in a different pan, each with a different technique -- and all would be, in their own creamy, runny, fluffy way, perfect.

Grab some eggs, some butter, and your favorite pan. Let's make scrambled eggs and toast something worth eating, all week long.

The Low and Slow Method

Scrambled eggs from Food52 Scrambled eggs from Food52

Yields: Creamy, rich, custard-y eggs with tiny curds.

How to do it: Break your eggs into a bowl, and whisk with 2 tablespoons of cream (or more!). Heat your non-stick or ceramic pan over low heat; melt a tablespoon of butter. Pour your eggs into the pan, and stir constantly with a wooden spoon. You want the eggs to cook slowly, so if they start sticking, turn your heat even lower. Stir, stir, stir, until the eggs look like pudding and your curds are all tiny and it looks like scrambled-egg soup in the best possible way. Take off the heat just before they look done. Season with salt.

Note: These can also be made with a saucepan and a whisk, à la Jean-Georges Vongerichten

Why we love it: Few things feel as luxurious as these rich, silky eggs; eating them out of a bowl with a spoon, wearing pajamas and fluffy socks, is one of life's greatest pleasures. If you're feeling even more indulgent, use crème fraîche -- or top the whole thing with caviar. 

The Rogue Method (à la Saltie in Brooklyn)

Scrambled eggs from Food52 scrambled eggs from Food52

Yields: Perfectly-cooked whites and runny yolks -- all scrambled together.

How to do it: Get an enamel or nonstick pan on the stove. Put in around a tablespoon of butter, and let it melt over medium-low heat. Crack an egg into a bowl -- leaving it whole! -- and slide it into your pan. Repeat with as many eggs as you'd like. Once your eggs are in there, carefully scramble the whites until they are cooked -- leaving your yolks intact. Once the whites are cooked, take the pan off the heat, crack the yolks, and mix it all together in the pan. Season with salt and pepper.

Why we love it: With this method, you get the best of the scrambled-egg and fried-egg worlds: fluffy, perfectly-cooked whites, and rich, runny yolks. Serve it with toast to scoop up any leftover yolk.

The Classic Method

Scrambled eggs from Food52 Scrambled eggs from Food52

Yields: Soft, fluffy eggs with big curds.

How to do it: Crack your eggs into a bowl, and whisk. Season with salt and pepper. Melt 2 tablespoons of butter on medium heat. Pour your eggs in, and let them stand for a few seconds. Then, start nudging: nudge your eggs towards the center, wait a few seconds, then nudge again. Do this until you have big, fluffy curds in the center of your pan. Take the eggs off the heat when the curds are set but still a little runny; they'll continue to cook on the way from the pan to your plate.

Why we love it: These are your no-fuss scrambled eggs: the ones you could make every morning for breakfast and live a very happy life. We make these when we don't have twenty minutes to spend stirring over the stove.

How do you make your scrambled eggs? Let us know in the comments! 

Jump to Comments (84)

Tags: eggs, scrambled eggs, how-to, how to, breakfast

Comments (84)

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Stringio

about 14 hours ago Etact

Without question the best method to scrambled eggs is low and slow. Any serious home cook or professional chef knows that. High heat breaks down the egg proteins which renders the eggs tougher even if cooked in a short time period. It's science of the egg.

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7 days ago RL

I use water that has dissolved chicken bouillion. Tastes divine. Add scallions. My kids always loved it.

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10 days ago Sophia Ad

i scramble my eggs ina bowl, adding milk and shredded cheese. melt some butter, get it nice and hot, add my eggs. they stay creamy, and yummy!

Stringio

11 days ago Danny Stutts

BEAT The EGGs With A Little Water n Milk!!

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13 days ago Qdmac

Low and Slow method - no way!
Best scrambled eggs are High and Fast (30 secs) should be done in a non-stick frying pan with a wide spatula to mix. No cream, just eggs and a small about of 2%, but may also throw in some Parmesan at the last few seconds. These are real fluffy and a famIly favorite!

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18 days ago Hernando

Hernando
In a very hot frying pan, melt one spoon of butter until burned, that is, until it becomes dark an quiet. This is the finest flavor you can get. Now add the scrambled eggs with a bit of pepper and nudge them when creamy slowly to the center. Try it.

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29 days ago F.D.R.

This article does it the hard way. I make great scrambled eggs in the microwave.
Smear the bottom & sides of a dish. Add your eggs and stir well. I like to top with 1/2 slice of American Cheese. For 4 eggs I nuke for 30 sec's. Remove & stir then nuke again for 25 sec's. Check for consistency, nuke more if you like. By the way I prefer to use 1 whole egg & 3 yolks, I can hear the health nuts groan.

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about 1 month ago jerry madden

I have been adding Heavy whipping cream to my eggs before scrambling for a few years now.Makes them moist and fluffy.

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about 1 month ago Tammi

Interesting concept. But I use water, high heat, non-stick pan and the perfect pinch of pepper and salt. My eggs have never dissapointed.

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about 1 month ago Alexis Elizabeth Drob

None of these look like scrambled eggs to me and far from anything i would ingest!!

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about 1 month ago Al

Hi Alexis Elizabeth, what a neat name. The way I fix my scrambled eggs is probably the same way you do. I went to a Chinese restaurant and seen these eggs with popcorn shrimp and diced scallions so I ode red it and was I ever surprised, absolutely great and what taste. Now I fix them for myself when I want a treat. I'll take 3 eggs crackup in the pan and start them like I would over easies, but then as they get to almost that point, I drop the scallions in along with the precooked shrimp and stir around. No milk, no nothing just the eggs, shrimp and scallions. Eat'um with chop sticks and you'll really get a great flavor and taste. I'm with you I don't need to mess around an complicate scrambled eggs.

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about 1 month ago Al

BTW, I'm an old guy and I wouldn't steer you wrong.

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about 1 month ago Mark D

Completely one sided opinion..3 or 4 eggs and 2 or 3 table spoons of WATER only.Milk products will toughiin the finished dish.Wisk eggs until foaming. Spray hot Med High pan lay in eggs and FOLD eggs with a silicon spatula. Remove when still soft just past runny.NO BROWNING...Eggs will continue cooking in its own steam....Trust me This is how it's done....soft and delicate

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about 1 month ago Neal

Just a pinch of baking powder will make them more fluffy. of course a slice of diet cheese makes them melt in your mouth delicious.

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about 1 month ago Maggie

If you use the "Low and Slow" method, even better than a wooden spoon is using a rubber spatula to stir the eggs; that way you don't have little drier bits left which the spoon couldn't reach.

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about 1 month ago Emily Di Febo Sheffer

We add mayo! Mmmmm. No need for salt!

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about 1 month ago cjbollinger

when do you add it?

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about 1 month ago Mary Baran

I'm going to give that one a shot!! No cream cheese, just mayo, right?

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about 1 month ago Mary Baran

I add a bit of cream cheese to the egg & milk mixture, then stir, stir, stif! They come out so soft and mellow. Season how you like; I use garlic salt and pepper

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about 1 month ago Al

How about 3 eggs scrambled, with some pop corn shrimp added along with a tad bit of cheese and scallions diced. Trust me it's hummers.

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about 1 month ago Al

That's supposed to be Yummers.

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about 1 month ago Melanie

I add a couple of slices of cheese when the eggs are still runny. The cheese melts slowly as the eggs cook. Makes a light, fluffy and tasty dish! My family loves them!

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about 1 month ago marty

I was taught to use water instead of milk as it makes it very fluffy. I like mine not runny at all.

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about 1 month ago Mark D

Exactly my point...You hit the nail on the head....I've been telling people that for years...even when I was a breakfast cook years ago I was the only one to use that method when I made guests their scrambled eggs...the waitress staff always gave good comments that customers thought the eggs were wonderful

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about 1 month ago Patricia Calcagno

James, you are not crazy at all. The super high heat, super fast, swirling technique is what Julia Child taught on one of her classic 1960's TV programs.

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2 months ago Mo

I use both the first with cream and the classic,never heard of the second one might try it.I add cheese to mine too sometimes which is nice.

Barn_owl

2 months ago Jeanne

I like to use the classic method. It makes huge, soft curds of eggs that are well cooked & not runny. BTW-The pan looks a lot like one I bought at Bed, Bath & Beyond. It is a ceramic coated non-stick by Aeternum & is a dream to use! Just remember not to use cooking sprays in it & always use wood or plastic utensils only. Also, don't plunge into washing water while hot; let it cool down first or the ceramic will crack! I think I paid about $25-$30 for an 8" pan. Prices go up according to size.

Prospect

3 months ago Jewels Vern

A nice recipe from Russia: http://englishrussia.com...

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4 months ago Katherine Guzman

Can you please tell me what that GORGEOUS pan is?????

Stringio

4 months ago Annie

I like to do something between low-and-slow and the classic variation! perfectly scrambled eggs..

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5 months ago DragonFly

Oh I'm trying this I just bought some organic fresh nutmeg, thanks for sharing!

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5 months ago Irenehope

Why must it always be salt and pepper? My soft scrambled eggs always get salt and nutmeg.

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5 months ago DragonFly

The creamy custard eggs are so good, I add a little grated old cheddar, just a little and some nice fresh chives!

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6 months ago benj

thanks james. i'll do that. anybody, please enlighten me as to the difference between a marmalade and a jam. Recipes, anyone?

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about 1 month ago Mark D

Jam is just the whole berry where as marmalade is made with small bits of citris peel

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6 months ago james

This is going to sound crazy, but the best way to a fluffy egg is to cook it super high and super fast. Heat non stick pan on high for two minutes, add butter and then eggs, cook for 20 seconds while swirling it in a circular motion. and you are done!

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6 months ago benj

thanks.i'll try the other methods for scrambled eggs.

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7 months ago Takura

I go the classic everytime will try the low and slow but I like big fluffy curds

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7 months ago Joycene

Heat the butter while mixing the eggs. I use about 2-3 teaspoons of whipped Philadelphia cream cheese in before cooking the egg, which should be stirred often. These eggs are creamy, fluffy and delicious. Even better if you have small bits of cream cheese that don't completely blend it. Also, you can sprinkle some dill weed into the eggs while mixing and top with a dollop of sour cream with this one.

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about 1 month ago Mary Baran

I do the same thing! I'm not big on dill, tho. I sometimes sprinkle a bit of shredded sharp cheddar on top after you plate it.

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7 months ago Simone Brightstein

I know this is anathema to cooks but I can 't BEAR any hint of runtiness in my scrambled eggs,so I cook them until they're practically burned. Sorry.

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8 months ago Bruno Schneider

The key is to use a double boiler to keep the temperature under control because eggs are extremely fragile and cooking them directly alters the taste into more of an omelette.
So beat the eggs well, add a little cream or butter (and any other treat like chives or very small amounts of truffle), stir them constantly and take them out when they are nice and still a bit runny.
The ultimate is to store the eggs for a few days in a sealed container with a truffle. The egg will absorb the truffle taste...

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8 months ago rei

I would also like to know where to get the ceramic pan pictured.

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5 months ago 212er

You can find the pan here:
http://ancientindustries...

Stringio

8 months ago Tammy Campbell

I always just beat the eggs,add salt and pepper and scramble in butter.I don't over-scramble as I like my eggs just set,not dry and not runny. Add some ketchup and toast and yum!

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8 months ago Debbie

I can't stand runny eggs so when I go to a restaurant I tell them rubbery is fine. In fact, I don't mind if they squeal (the sound rubbery eggs make in the pan). However, ideally I'd just like them cooked thoroughly but not rubbery. What I've found works the best is I whisk the eggs and add salt and pepper (before or after in the pan is fine). I add shredded cheddar cheese and keep whisking until they're fluffy but done. You get your nice, fluffy eggs without them still being partially raw (Gross!).

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8 months ago prem kishore

Ever tried a spicy scramble? Beat up four eggs in a bowl. Slice one or two green chillies, a pinch of golden yellow turmeric, one emerald green curry leaf chopped fine, a small pearly white onion diced .Add to the eggs. Beat briskly. Squeeze a luscious red cherry tomato into the bowl. A tablespoon of butter on the pan, heat well.Add the glorious mix, tone down heat and scramble the mixture till eggs are cooked. Remove and add a sprig of tender green cilantro on top.

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8 months ago arbeenyc

These are all fine. However, the way I learned - and the method I prefer - is to cook the beaten eggs in a double boiler with a generous amount of butter. No cream. Lightly salt and pepper the beaten eggs before cooking. This yields soft, creamy eggs. They need to be whisked or stirred all the time for they'll cook very quickly over the boiling water.

Stringio

9 months ago Michael Choy

I used to always be an over-easy guy, but I am a convert of the low 'n slow method - such scrumptious velvety egg sauce on my (carb of choice)! My question: what pan is used in those pictures?? I haven't found a good alternative to Teflon, and that one looks a dream!

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9 months ago Robin

Michael, I don't know what pan this is but I absolutely adore my ceramic lined cookware. I have some made by Tramontina, and have also seen a nice set at Bed Bath and Beyond but can't remember the brand. I will never go back to Teflon. Just let it get warm before putting the food in it and use non metal utensils (I love Calphalon tools). Also, use butter or oil for cooking instead of sprays like Pam. I cook my eggs with just a small amount of milk or half-n-half in just a little butter using the third method listed here. Late in the cooking process, I add a little grated cheese. My husband loves to cook but says I make the best eggs he has ever had! You don't have to spend a lot of money to get just the basic saucepans and a couple sizes of skillets. Walmart even has some skillets, but I haven't tried them. Good luck!

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9 months ago Robin

Oh...and also a bit of salt and pepper;).

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7 months ago JohnL

Scanpan makes a line of ceramic titanium non-stick cookware that you can use metal utensils with. It is wonderful to cook with. It can be subjected to searing temperatures (up to 500 degrees no problem). The downside is that the bigger pieces are HEAVY (the wok weighs a ton but heats up good & hot and has superb heat retention qualities), unfortunately Scanpan is some of the most expensive cookware on the market. But it is durable and has a lifetime warranty.

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9 months ago fawmy

nice

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10 months ago Luvtocook

Just made #3 method yesterday (yummy!) so was curious to see what the three methods were. Thanks for the variations. Eggs scrambled and a side of fruit bread is my very favorite breakfast although I don't have fluffy slippers. Maybe Santa will bring me some (which means I'll buy them myself). :)

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11 months ago angiemama

Just tried the Rogue method substituting olive oil for butter and they were the best eggs I have ever had.

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11 months ago LB

Could eat for breakfast every morning? Why just breakfast? I eat these things all day long! Oh, and try option #2 served over fresh sauteed sweet pepper and spinach. Yummm!!!

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11 months ago Mel

Am I the only one hesitant to eat a runny yolk? Can't you get Salmonella?

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9 months ago Indy6

Hi Mel. most cases are when raw egg is used in a food 'vehicle' like mayo or mousse that's then left sitting around letting bacteria grow. It's also a problem with eggs farmed in less than favourable conditions. Try finding a reliable source of free-range organic eggs from healthy farms.

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11 months ago thirteenJ

A spoonful of sour cream stirred into cooked scrambled eggs

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11 months ago YetAnotherDave

I prefer to crack the eggs over melted butter, leaving the yokes intact until the whites begin to solidify, then breaking the yokes and swirling them both together for a bi-colorful finish.

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11 months ago darrell walery

And while we are at it, here is how to make the perfect hard boiled egg (no boiling needed): http://tiptomato.com/?p...

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8 months ago Dan Nicholls

That's soo cool Darrell I will try that out for sure thanks

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11 months ago Charles

Seasoning with salt before cooking results in water separating from the egg, and thus a dry clump of egg with a pool of unappetizing water around the base). My method is pretty much the same as the third way, but I season with both salt and pepper at the end - never before.

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11 months ago Don

Crack the desired number of eggs into a glass bowl, dish, etc. Add a little seasoning, add milk/cream/butter as is your taste. Couple of slashes with a knife to break the yolks. Microwave for about 30/40 secs to get some heat in then couple more slashes with a knife & repeat in microwave, decreasing time by halves & stop when it's still quite 'wet'. The mix will continue to cook with the inherent heat so serve quickly. Less mess & just slashing the mixture gives a soft, chunky consistency.

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11 months ago Rinchen

I use the Gordon Ramsay method. Eggs are cracked into the pan and then combined removing the pan ftom the heat periodically. There is a video about it.'My mother used a double boiler and added milk.

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11 months ago fhp

All great methods. Love the rogue....so rouge.
I grew up on a farm with the classic ones but made with cream. My Mom was always adamant about the flame being not too high, a ridiculous amount of butter, and the gentlest stirring till just slightly underdone. "Let them stay a little wet." Boy, what a difference. Scrambled eggs and omelets are really the things I never order in a breakfast joint as I am always disappointed by the rubbery result.

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11 months ago Kukla

I like to scramble eggs with a rich homemade chicken stock, which makes them smoother and fluffier than with milk or cream. http://food52.com/recipes...

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11 months ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Whoa, Kukla, what a brilliant idea! I often save a tablespoon of pan juices from roasts, to use the next morning drizzled over omelets. I will definitely try your suggestion, using my own rich chicken stock (as in, I throw in a few pieces of ham while it's simmering) next time I make scrambled eggs. Thank you once again for sharing your seemingly endless wisdom with the community. ;o)

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11 months ago Kukla

Thank you AJ, but this brilliant idea belongs to Alexandre Dumas, best known as the author of “The Three Musketeers” and “The Count of Monte Cristo”. I read about scrambling eggs with chicken stock in his Cookbook “Le Grand Dictionnaire De Cuisine” which he, being a gourmet and a gourmand considered his real masterpiece and which I sometimes like to read just as a very interesting novel.

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11 months ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thank you, Kukla. I had no idea that Dumas wrote that book. How interesting! It's now on my must-read list. ;o)

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7 months ago JohnL

I know Gordon Ramsay has many followers, but in my experience (using Bill Granger's recipe and technique), heavy cream makes the smoothest and most custardy wonderful scrambled eggs. They have long been considered the non-plus-ultra version of scrambled eggs by many foodies (I like 2-4 TB heavy cream per 2 large eggs, although he uses 1/3 cup in his book; but the version in the New York Times is too-too for my taste with 1/2 cup of heavy cream--these don't even taste like scrambled eggs anymore). But milk, for some reason I've had that curdle on me. Plain water (1TB per 2 large eggs) makes for light, very nice scrambled eggs. If I add salt just as I'm beating the eggs in the bowl and then scramble them immediately, I don't run into the problem of having them "break down" and separating into egg with a water puddle on the plate. There is more than one path to scrambled eggs that measure up to your own personal standard of "great".

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11 months ago QueenSashy

I am the rogue girl 100%. But I scramble the whites when they are 85% cooked.

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11 months ago ATG117

Am i the only person in the world who doesn't like runny scrambles eggs? Low and slow always looks utterly unappetizing to me. Crazy?

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11 months ago John Albert

No not crazy. My wife doesnt like it running as it looks unappetizing to her. Everyone has their own flavor and taste about how food is prepared. Its wonderful knowing that not everyone is the same.

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7 months ago JohnL

I'm with you ATG117--the thought of eating scrambled eggs cooked low & slow to the texture of oatmeal makes my stomach churn. I like scrambled eggs softly/barely set with a little jiggle but no "run" and it takes a lot of practice to get the knack of getting them to turn out just right. On the other hand, fully set stiffened eggs smelling of sulfur are also a turn off.

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11 months ago walkie74

I am all about the Classic. I prefer to heat my pan while I beat the eggs, though. That way, when the eggs hit the pan, they immediately start to cook, and I can start pushing the curds around. I rarely have to deal with browning, and that's just the way I like it.

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11 months ago sygyzy

Very much a low and slow fan. The slower the better.

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11 months ago cucina di mammina

I have been cooking my eggs using the rogue
Method for years as we all prefer the runny yolks to dip our toast in. I do also love the low and slow, creamy version for an indulgent breakfast served with luxurious smoked salmon, capers and chives and toasted ciabatta bread

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11 months ago Brette Warshaw

Looove that combo!

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11 months ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Oh, goodness, that does sound good. ;o)

Stringio

11 months ago Basil Glew-Galloway

For the rogue, couldn't you just reserve the yolks until the end? Seems like that would make it easier to scramble the whites.

Dscf2184

11 months ago cjbollinger

I'm familiar with the 'classic' & the 'low and slow', but thanks for the 'Rouge'! Will try this AM....WITH our farm fresh chicken eggs - makes a helluva difference. x

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11 months ago Brette Warshaw

Jealous!! And yes, the rogue method is my new go-to. Hope you like it!

Stringio

11 months ago Susana Margarida Coelho

Boa dica :)
Kiss, Susana
Nota: Ver o passatempo a decorrer no meu blog:
http://tertuliadasusy.blogspot...