Videos

Amanda's Olive Oil Press-In Tart Crust

By • December 18, 2013 • 22 Comments

Today: Watch Amanda make the simplest olive oil-based, press-in tart crust.

For more about olive oil, visit the Filippo Berio Facebook page for a chance to share your olive oil tips and win a week of cooking classes in Lucca, Italy!

When you think of making tarts, your first thought is probably: I want that. But the second, most likely, is of the work it requires: the chilling of the butter, the chilling of the dough, the flouring of the counter, all the rolling out. That tart, now, seems far away; it seems like a project. It seems like something for not this very second.

But with Amanda's technique -- which she demonstrates above -- you can have that tart now. No butter, no chilling, no rolling-out required; this is a tart crust made in two bowls and pressed right into your pan. Plus, Amanda provides a ratio for converting your butter-based baked goods into olive oil-based baked goods. Watch the video, and hey -- make yourself a tart right after.

Olive Oil Tart Crust

Makes one 11-inch tart crust

1 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon sugar
1/2 cup mild olive oil
2 tablespoons whole milk
1/2 teaspoon almond extract

1. In a mixing bowl, stir together 1 1/2 cups flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon sugar. Stirring enables the salt and sugar to sift the flour, so you don’t need to sift it in advance. In a small bowl, whisk together the olive oil, milk and almond extract. Pour this mixture into the flour mixture and mix gently with a fork, just enough to dampen; do not over work it.

2. Transfer the dough to an 11-inch tart pan (you can use a smaller one if needed), and use your hands to pat out the dough so it covers the bottom of the pan, pushing it up the sides to meet the edge. This will work if you pat firmly and confidently, but not if you curl your fingertips into the dough. It should be about 1/ 8-inch thick all around; trim and discard excess dough.

 


This post was brought to you by Filippo Berio Olive Oil.

 

 

From Our Friends
powered by ZergNet

Tags: video, olive oil, dessert, tart, tarts, baking, crust, filippo berio

Comments (22)

Default-small
Default-small
Default-small

6 months ago petrini.elisa

is a tart pan necessary? can you make it in a regular glass or metal pie pan?

Default-small

6 months ago Granolagirl

I plan on trying this to make a quiche (omitting the sugar). Do you think I should blind bake it first? This might be the solution to my search for a quick quiche crust (I hope!).

Default-small

7 months ago celine

Quick question--how sweet is the dough and could I just cut back on the amount of sugar? I love the idea of using the olive oil crust for a savory tart but don't want to mess up any ratios! (Last year was my Year of Dough, in which I finally conquered my fear of making crusts and breads, but I still have some lingering self-doubt...)

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

7 months ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

The recipe included with this post shows 3/4 cup of sugar, which is incorrect if you are just making the crust, and not the whole fruit tart. The recipe for the tart including the fruit has you stir 3/4 cup of sugar into the peaches, if I remember correctly. To make just the crust, you only use 1 teaspoon of sugar. The editors should correct this, to avoid further confusion. Also, if you want to use this for a savory tart, you can delete the teaspoon of sugar. ;o)

Default-small

7 months ago Pam

I just made this recipe and I don't understand why there is '3/4 cup of sugar plus 1 teaspoon' ....I don't see any use for the 3/4 cup, in print or on the video. Any thoughts?

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

7 months ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Pam, I just answered another question arising from the same error in the ingredients list posted above. You only use 1 teaspoon of sugar in the tart crust. The 3/4 cup of sugar is for the fruit used when making the peach tart from which this post was derived. ;o)

Default-small

7 months ago Dillybean

Why does it have butter as the last ingredient? The directions don't say anything about butter.

Default-small

7 months ago Windischgirl

Discard the trimmings?! Are you kidding?? You place them on a piece of parchment on a cookie sheet and bake until golden. Then eat with a cup of tea and a dab of jam.

Default-small

7 months ago walkie74

I don't suppose there are any substitutes for the almond extract? Maybe ground almonds or something?

400584_2795982053875_1473082837_n_(1)

7 months ago Brette Warshaw

Hi all -- Just added a link to the recipe! My apologies on that!

Default-small

7 months ago Nancy

Where is the recipe?!

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

7 months ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

It's part of the Peach Tart recipe:

Makes one 11-inch tart; serves 8

1 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour
3/4 teaspoons kosher salt
3/4 cups plus 1 teaspoon sugar
1/4 cup vegetable or canola oil
1/4 cup mild olive oil
2 tablespoons whole milk
1/2 teaspoon almond extract
2 tablespoons cold, unsalted butter

Heat the oven to 425 degrees. In a mixing bowl, stir together 1 1/2 cups flour, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1 teaspoon sugar. Stirring enables the salt and sugar to sift the flour, so you don’t need to sift it in advance. In a small bowl, whisk together the oils, milk and almond extract. Pour this mixture into the flour mixture and mix gently with a fork, just enough to dampen; do not over work it. Then, transfer the dough to an 11-inch tart pan (you can use a smaller one if needed), and use your hands to pat out the dough so it covers the bottom of the pan, pushing it up the sides to meet the edge. This will work if you pat firmly and confidently, but not if you curl your fingertips into the dough. It should be about 1/ 8-inch thick all around; trim and discard excess dough.
Here is a link to the recipe: http://food52.com/recipes...
I always substitute a few tablespoons of toasted wheat germ for some of the flour when I make this to give it a nutty taste. This has become a real go-to for me, as I mentioned below. ;o)

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

7 months ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Ooops. I just realized that the last ingredient -- 2 T. of cold butter -- goes with the peaches on the tart itself, and is not a part of the crust. ;o)

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

7 months ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

What I like about it is that you can make it on the hottest day of the year and it doesn't complain or require a lot of pampering, the way butter-filled crusts do. Plus, you can make this in a cabin on a river in the woods with a tiny kitchenette that doesn't have a square inch of counter space. (I've made this crust so many times. My family loves it, too.) ;o)

Default-small

7 months ago Valhalla

I appreciate the tutorials, but can you please always include a text recipe?

Image

7 months ago Nancy

Yes, please. That would be very helpful.

Mrs._larkin_370

7 months ago mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

Here's Amanda's tart recipe! http://food52.com/recipes...

Img_0440

7 months ago NellyBell

This is not actually the tart crust recipe she is using in the video, which has milk but no canola. I would love to have the recipe because I just bought my first ever tart pan.

Rivki_locker_small

7 months ago Ordinary Blogger (Rivki Locker)

Actually, it is the same recipe. In the video she also uses part canola and part olive oil, and she has milk in both. Pie make it all the time and it's amazing.

Mrs._larkin_370

7 months ago mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

Hi ellie! Rivki is right, it *is* the recipe Amanda is using in the video. She probably doesn't mention it because this is a Filippo Berrio olive oil sponsored post.

Img_0440

7 months ago NellyBell

Thanks for clarifying. I can't wait to try this.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

7 months ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

I made this one with all olive oil, which is how I used to make the recipe. I believe the recipe my mother gave me called for all vegetable oil. I also make the version I published on the site, which includes both. Summary: you can use whatever oil you like!