Cooking From Every Angle Articles

Thanksgiving Sweets

November 20, 2009 • 2 Comments

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Finally, we turn to the end of the meal. Pie usually dominates, but there are some people for whom (horror of horrors!) pie is not the dessert of choice. Here, we feature recipes from our winners and finalists for sweets that just may put those pumpkin pie cravings to rest.

Fig and Anise Clafoutis by Oui, Chef -- great made with dried figs, if you can't find fresh

Rum Apple Cake by colombedujour -- a gluten free option

Pudding Chomeur by camille -- a celebration of maple syrup

An Old Fashioned Apple Spice Cake by betteirene -- a dramatic, holiday-worthy presentation

 

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Tuscan Onion Confit

November 12, 2009 • 12 Comments

Onion

 

- Merrill

For years now, on the day before Thanksgiving my mother has made what in my family goes by the slightly unappetizing name of "Tuscan Onion Goo." Inspired by a visit to a family-owned gem in Florence called Ristorante del Fagioli, this sour-sweet onion confit was originally served to her as an antipasto. She enjoyed it so much that she asked, in halting but enthusiastic Italian, if the waiter would tell her how it was made. He promptly ushered her into the tiny kitchen, where the sweaty, grinning chef himself showed her how to put together the dish. She took mental notes and then came home and recreated it, with a few small adaptations.

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The Metropolitan Cook Book

November 9, 2009 • 7 Comments

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Metropolitan Cookbook

- Amanda

At the food52 launch party, Tamio gave Merrill and me a great little book, The Metropolitan Cook Book, published by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company in 1924.

The book begins with a quote by Ruskin that mirrors so much about our approach to cooking at food52: "Cookery means carefulness and inventiveness and willingness and readiness of appliances. It means the economy of your grandmothers and the science of the modern chemist; it means much testing and no wasting; it means English thoroughness and French Art and Arabian hospitality." We may need to work on the French Art and Arabian hospitality, but we're getting there.

 

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Maple Syrup Vinaigrette

October 27, 2009 • 10 Comments

Maple_syrup

 

Last week, a colleague emailed me for some help with a piece she was writing on maple syrup -- specifically, on how lots of chefs are using it in savory dishes. She may have seen a short blurb I wrote on Grade B maple syrup when it was all the rage a couple of years ago, or she may just have been asking for my input as a cook and an eater. But it got me thinking. Last year, I created a fall salad for a dinner party that went over particularly well; I used maple syrup in the vinaigrette, which I hadn't done before (if a dressing is too tart, I typically add a bit of honey or raw sugar). At the time, I made a mental note to start using maple syrup in my salad dressings on a regular basis. Alas, good intentions are not always enough: time and time again over the past year, it slipped my mind, and my vinaigrettes remained sadly syrup-free.

 

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Mashed Sweet Potatoes with Creme Fraiche and Herbs

October 22, 2009 • 2 Comments

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- Merrill

While I have always been somewhat of a sweet potato addict, I prefer savory preparations to the traditional brown sugar and maple syrup concoctions typically found on the Thanksgiving table. I originally got the idea for these potatoes from Marcus Samuelsson, chef and co-owner of Aquavit in Manhattan. A few years ago, he teamed up with Slow Food to give cooking lessons to some of the students at The Children's Storefront, an independent tuition-free school in Harlem. I happened to be there observing one afternoon when he taught the kids his version of the recipe, and I have been making my own adaptation ever since. I hope you'll find the combination of sweet potatoes, crème fraîche, garlic, herbs and parmesan as rich and satisfying as I do.

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Butternut Squash Salad

October 20, 2009 • 6 Comments

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- Amanda

This past weekend, on a trek to Chelsea Market in Manhattan with a friend and our kids, we stopped in for lunch at Buon Italia, an Italian grocery store that many of the city's chefs turn to for esoteric and high-quality Italian ingredients. I couldn't stop thinking about one of the dishes we had, a butternut squash antipasto. The squash had been sliced into ribbons so that it looked like pappardelle, and then these ribbons seemed to have been roasted -- there were browned edges -- and yet not quite cooked through -- some had a great little crunch. They tasted candied but were doused with plenty of vinegar.

Transfixed and determined, I got in the kitchen, and now you, too, can make this salad....

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Merrill's Kitchen Tour

October 6, 2009 • 17 Comments

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Merrill

Since we did a video tour of Amanda's kitchen, I thought I'd put together a slide show of mine. Here I've included some of my favorite cooking and serving items, along with a recipe for Coconut Rice Pudding with Ginger Lemongrass Syrup that would be perfect served in the Roseware glasses my mother gave me.

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Warm Fig and Blue Cheese Salad

October 1, 2009 • 2 Comments

Warm_fig

 

- Amanda

After a week during which my kitchen felt like an apple cake factory, I figured it was time for a salad. So I took the concepts behind escarole salad with warm bacon dressing and pear and blue cheese salad -- two salads I love -- and combined them. I crisped bacon in a pan, then sauteed shallots and figs, and finished the dressing with red wine vinegar and a little sugar. The warm dressing softens the lettuce leaves -- I used curly endive but you could use escarole, arugula or romaine -- and adds a little bitterness. And for a little salinity to contrast with the sweet figs, I crumbled some blue cheese on top.

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Char, Fast and Slow

September 29, 2009 • 3 Comments

Char

 

Merrill

Recently, we've been trying to eat more fish in my house. One day I was at the market looking for wild salmon and discovered they were out of it. Although I had never cooked with it before, I bought some arctic char at the fishmonger's recommendation. That night, I improvised with a few things I had in the fridge, and the resulting recipe is one I've repeated many times since. It's simple and quick, but it never fails to please.

Keeping the skin on, you coat the fish in a lemon herb mayonnaise and then cook it, skin up, at a very low temperature (250°) for 15 to 20 minutes. Then, you flip it over and broil it quickly to brown the top. The gentle cooking keeps the fish really tender and prevents it from drying out, and the broiler gives you the added benefit of some caramelization -- it's the best of both worlds. You can make this recipe with salmon, but char is a fish you should get to know if you don't already. Not only does it have a mild, rich flavor, but it's also an eco-friendly choice.

 

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Night Grilling

September 28, 2009 • 0 Comments

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Paul Kogan- Amanda (photo by Deborah Copaken Kogan)

This past weekend, my husband and I had dinner at our friends' Deb and Paul's house. Paul had marinated a butterflied leg of lamb to grill on their rooftop patio, and he headed out there well after dark. The fall's earlier sundowns have never stopped people from grilling, but grilling in the dark usually involves a jury-rigged move with flashlights. Paul, an excellent cook, has come up with a nifty solution: he wears a camping headlamp from L.L.Bean. Nerdy, you say? I think not, after tasting his perfectly grilled lamb. For the recipe....continue reading.

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