THE FOOD52 CLASSICS: IT DOESN’T GET BETTER THAN THESE. SHOP NOW »
All questions

A question about a recipe: Italian Style Boule

20e90261 08b9 4f46 a6e2 2519858dc3a4  img 4188

What is the correct internal temperature for parbaking this (shaped 1/2 recipe into fat batards)? Thanks so much. ;o)

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

asked over 4 years ago
8 answers 1074 views
2f4926e2 248b 4c22 a6f7 8f2d888b8488  3 bizcard
sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 4 years ago

Hi AJ, I defer to boulangere if I am wrong but have made 10 loaves now the last 2 being fat batards and internal temp that boulangere said is 200-205. Thats the temp I used and mine were perfect.

2f4926e2 248b 4c22 a6f7 8f2d888b8488  3 bizcard
sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 4 years ago

I am sorry I didn't see that you wanted to parbake. Maybe boulangere knows the answer. I have parbaked just like HLA describes and have never taken an internal temperature. When I baked my loaves yesterday after a little over 15 (closer to 20) minutes when you rotate 180 degrees they appeared to have finished rising and had only the palest color. If I were parbaking I would have taken them out at that time.

F8c5465c 5952 47d4 9558 8116c099e439  dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 4 years ago

Thank you, sdb! I went to bed early last night, and just read the question. Your answer is exactly right.

3639eee1 5e0d 4861 b1ed 149bd0559f64  gator cake
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added over 4 years ago

Wouldn't 200-205 be for the finished loaf? I think AJ wants to partially bake them now, and finish them later. My answer for parbaking would be to bake them until they have finished rising, but haven't taken on much if any color, but I don't know what internal temperature that would be.

B3038408 42c1 4c18 b002 8441bee13ed3  new years kitchen hlc only
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 4 years ago

Yes, HLA is right, I was asking about the internal temperature for partially baking. Not having heard anything last night from the Hotline, I did some research online at The Fresh Loaf, and determined that yeast stops working at 140 degrees, which pretty much defines the point of maximum "oven spring." I put my probe in and set the oven to 140, and sure enough, at that temperature the loaves had lightly browned but had "sprung" nicely. So I took them out, cooled them overnight, and this morning, tripled wrapped and popped them in the freezer. All the while, i was asking myself why I didn't start this project when the boys were home! Mr T is not complaining, however. He's enjoying the first large loaf, which will be used for herbed croutons and French toast as well as sandwiches and toast for snacking. This recipe creates a sensational bread, which is perfect in every respect.. (I modified the recipe to use more water in the preferment, according to the instructions in boulangere's blog.) Thank you, everyone. ;o)

F8c5465c 5952 47d4 9558 8116c099e439  dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 4 years ago

Thanks, hla. I just finished reading the question, the WHOLE question, too! AJ, go for 165 on a par-baked temp. It's important to coagulate the proteins, then basically finish driving off some moisture and brown on the final bake. Thanks for your patience.

243986d9 056a 406e afb1 5f90018517ff  open uri20141203 5451 r3spst
added 5 months ago

Does the 200-205 internal temp for a completed boule also work for a 1 lb boule? I am looking to completely bake a 1lb boule. Thanks

B3038408 42c1 4c18 b002 8441bee13ed3  new years kitchen hlc only
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added 5 months ago

Yes, bake to the same temperature, no matter the size of the loaf or boule. That's what makes this method so sensible and easy to use. ;o)