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Fish: to reheat or not to reheat?

Do you reheat fish, and if so, what is your most effective way of doing so? I am contemplating poaching so it's slightly underdone and either poaching again to finish, or finishing in a low temperature oven. Are there other ways you reheat fish that don't ruin the texture, especially for fish that is grilled or pan seared? Obviously, no one likes a rubbery or overdone filet!

asked by MangiaPhilomena over 2 years ago
7 answers 11070 views
Food52
added over 2 years ago

So, let me get it right... you want to "par-cook" your fish to finish off quickly at a later time?

If I am reading your question right, I would tell you not to. fish cooks so quickly, that par-cooking is not really necessary. You can poach, grill, pan sear or broil a fish filet in less than 5 minutes.

I can't tell you for sure (because I've never done it), but I would guess that the texture of your finished product would be below its maximum potential, so to speak, by par-cooking.

If you are asking about casually re-heating left-overs from the day before, I do it all the time. I just don't expect it to be quite as fresh. depending on how it was prepared, just do it in a low temp oven or microwave.

Default-small
added over 2 years ago

To provide some further color - I am making some individually portioned dishes to stock someone (a non cook) with food for the week. While I would typically never serve fish any way other than a la minute, they specifically requested two portions of fish, and would prefer them hot. While instinct tells me this isn't a good idea, I was curious to know if anyone else has a way that works well.

P1291120
added over 2 years ago

So, Benny, are you suggesting that "par-cooking" fish would end up with a "sub-par" result? ;) [sorry everyone, couldn't resist. Depending on who you talk to, puns are either the highest or lowest form of humor...]

Food52
added over 2 years ago

If a friend requested an individually portioned fish dish for the week, I might prepare a "ready-to-heat fish en papillote. Alternatively, what sarah suggested. Pre-searing an oilier fish or using precooked fish as part of a bigger item, such as fish cakes.

Sarah_chef
Reiney

Sarah is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

I think it depends a lot on the type of fish you're using: an oiler fish will be able to withstand a reheat better than a drier fish.

If it's a leftover question, I'd suggest instead looking for an alternative use for the fish - like a fish cake/burger.

Food52
added over 2 years ago

Good point. If you are catering to a large group that must all be served at the same time, such as a banquet, I can see the benefit to searing several thick salmon filets to be finished off in the oven just before service. Pan searing 50 fish filets at the same time is not typically feasible.

Like Sarah said, only certain fish can handle that much cooking without being destroyed.

Default-small
added over 2 years ago

Finishing poached fish in the oven is not a problem and I do several recipes that do just that. Holding slightly under cooked fish for any length of time is a food safety issue and can make you and your guests very sick.