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How to decide on a sharpening stone!

I mostly have Wusthof Classic knives and am wondering what sharpening stone I can use? There's a lot of different brands on the market and would love some suggestions!

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Bigpan
bigpan added over 1 year ago

Get a two-sided Japanese stone, usually 1,000 grit on one side and 300 on the other. Use with mineral oil. I think Amazon have some. The usual hardware store ones are not fine enough (unless you get 1,000 grit).
Consider taking it to a good sushi house and ask for a lesson. Make an appointment and Go before they open for dinner and take a gift.

Uruguay2010_61
usuba dashi added over 1 year ago

The Japanese stones are made to be used with water, not oil. Amazon has a good selection of synthetic water stones. A natural water stone is very expensive, but is the best. It is best to get the 1,000/6,000 stone. I would highly recommend getting a book on Japanese knives that explains techniques and science of sharpening. You will have greater success if you do and an edge that lasts for weeks. I was taught 40 years ago by a Japanese chef how to sharpen knives . . . I can shave with the edge after sharpening ever time.

Zester_003

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added about 1 year ago

Please keep in mind though, that the bevel on Japanese knives is different from Western knives. If your collection is Wusthoff you may not want to follow Japanese technique. If it's still in print an excellent book on the subject is "The Professional Chef's Knife Kit" from CIA, published by Wiley.

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Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 1 year ago

we use and have been extremely pleased with a less expensive version of the Edge Pro (my husband calls ours the Edge Faux). We use both Japanese and German knives so you have to change the angle of the sharpening stone but the blades are incredibly sharp afterwards. I highly recommend Edge in the Kitchen by Chad Ward too- it's a great book about knives, sharpening, sharpening stones, etc.

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