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A question about a recipe: Meyer Lemon Focaccia

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I have a question about the recipe "Meyer Lemon Focaccia" from deensiebat. Meyer lemon Foccaccia: Is it absolutley essential to let the dough sit overnight in the fridge

asked by Panfusine over 3 years ago
11 answers 1539 views
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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added over 3 years ago

The dough develops more flavor as it undergoes a long, slow rise, so no, it isn't absolutely essential, but you wont' have the depth of flavor in the end result.

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added over 3 years ago

Thanks Maedl.. I'll hold out till tomorrow, it will be well worth it (now if only I can stop myself from pinching off pieces of dough to nibble when I fold it!)

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Maedl

Margie is a trusted home cook immersed in German foodways.

added over 3 years ago

The anticipation will only make it better!

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boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 3 years ago

The flavor will be better, and so will the texture. Overnighting a dough permits bacterial growth to continue, which deepens flavor, or "character." It also essentially puts the yeast to sleep gradually, not all at once. It's growth continues, albeit very slowly, then awakens the next day once the dough is returned to room temp. The result will be the much more open, irregular crumb which is characteristic of good focaccia.

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added over 3 years ago

Thanks Cynthia, I'm so glad I did not give in to the overwhelming temptation of getting the baking sheet ready..The bread will be well worth the wait!

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boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 3 years ago

I know that temptation all too well! We'd love to hear how it turns out for you. I'd give an arm for an edit function so I could fix It's.

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added over 3 years ago

Suppose someone started the recipe without reading the 'rest overnight' part and planned to bring it to dinner this evening, would you rest the dough on the counter for a few hours as opposed to the fridge at this point?

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boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 3 years ago

Yes, Midge, that's exactly what I'd do. Enjoy your dinner!

Fbc31129 dd77 4f50 92da 5ddc4a29c892  summer 2010 1048
added over 3 years ago

Thanks so much, Cynthia. Turned out great, scrumptious in fact. Look forward to seeing how my next batch -- with the proper rest time -- compares.

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added over 3 years ago

Panfusine, you mention being tempted to nibble on the uncooked dough. I don't know if this has been disproven, but I used to read that uncooked yeast dough is 'antinutritional' -- that it can use some of the B vitamins (I think) in your gut. (Doubt that you could eat enough to cause a real problem, though.)

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added over 3 years ago

wow.. I had no idea, thanks susan g, No, I certainly didn't make a dent in the quantity of dough, but its just the 'irresistability' factor, or maybe it was because my mom always used to admonish me as a kid not to eat uncooked dough.. This thread has certainly been a great learning session!