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How to microwave corn on the cob?

asked by Zerobot over 1 year ago
19 answers 1386 views
Monita_photo
Monita

Monita is a Recipe Tester for Food52

added over 1 year ago

Wrap the corn (out of the husk) in plastic wrap and microwave on high for 4-6 min

Sit2
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added over 1 year ago

One way to is to microwave in the husk 3-4mins depending on freshness. Then slice off the stalk end and the ear of corn will just slide out--leaving the husks and silk behind.

Dsc01280
added over 1 year ago

This old man is adorable and it's a pretty useful trick.
http://www.youtube.com...

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 1 year ago

I guess I'm totally old school, but how hard is it to boil water? You husk and yank off the silks. I see no time saving in the microwave process. But then I probably come from a different planet.

Img_4692
added about 1 year ago

Mr Tough Love, boiling water is about as simple as it gets. But, to answer your question, it seems wasteful (water, time, electricity) to bring a pot of water to boil for 1 - 2 ears. At least that's why I microwave on occasion (with husks on). Now, when there's a big collection of cobs to cook then into the pot of water they go.

2007-09-11e-s4
added over 1 year ago

Microwave c-o-c is a great treat and sooo easy. Some crotchety ol' guy put a recipe for it (complete with pictures) at http://mantestedrecipes...

Corn__micro-02

Default-small
added over 1 year ago

Thanks for the answers. Should have mentioned that the corn I had (mea culpa, mea culpa) was already free of its husk. I ended up wrapping them in damp paper towels, 2 minutes, flip, 2 more minutes. Came out pretty good.

And Pierino, in the time it takes to get water to boil, the corn is done in the microwave. I think that the trick, as some have suggested, is to add water to be heated/steamed by the microwave.

Mrs._larkin_370
mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

added over 1 year ago

with the husk, I've been doing it the way Gibson mentions - try it, you'll be amazed.

with the husk off, your damp paper towel method is spot-on. I've done this many times.

When you're cooking one ear of corn, these techniques work, and are a huge time saver. If you're cooking corn for 20 people, make Pierino happy and boil a cauldron of water.

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 1 year ago

Okay, Pierino admits to being a geezer and a purist but he has yet to discover a food that is actually improved by microwaving. He's living in the Slow Food chain. And also when required can throw a four seam change up.

Imag0055
added over 1 year ago

Why eat corn on the cob in February anyway? Can't be very good.

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 1 year ago

mainecook introduces an interesting point which I mostly agree with but not entirely. Corn is considered a "commodity" and it's traded as such. Last year's drought ravaged most of the corn and soy from the Midwest. That said, the origin of corn (maize) is from the Americas as in Central and South America, so the stuff that you are seeing in your markets is coming up from those nether parts where it actually began. I doubt that the Pilgrims ate corn on the cob on that first Thanksgiving.

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added over 1 year ago

Speaking to Sam's point, he's right about the word "corn". Not that I have any interest in the King James bible. Maize probably captures it better. In France they still treat corn cob as food for pigs. The Italians however grow "granoturcco" (how the Turks come into it remains a mystery) but of course the most successful they devised was polenta once they figured out the lime thing.

Sit2
Sam1148

Sam is a trusted home cook.

added over 1 year ago

If you read some historical books or even Jules Verne books..The term "Corn" refered to any type of grain like wheat and barley as it's used in the KJV of the Bible.




2007-09-11e-s4
added over 1 year ago

maincook61, we get some very good corn from South American and even Mexico this time of year. It costs about twice what we pay for local corn in season, but is worth the price for a taste of summer!

2007-09-11e-s4
added over 1 year ago

maincook61, we get some very good corn from South American and even Mexico this time of year. It costs about twice what we pay for local corn in season, but is worth the price for a taste of summer!

2007-09-11e-s4
added over 1 year ago

maincook61, we get some very good corn from South American and even Mexico this time of year. It costs about twice what we pay for local corn in season, but is worth the price for a taste of summer!

2007-09-11e-s4
added over 1 year ago

maincook61, we get some very good corn from South American and even Mexico this time of year. It costs about twice what we pay for local corn in season, but is worth the price for a taste of summer!

Default-small
added over 1 year ago

I get good results microwaving corn on the cob this way: Husk the corn, remove the silk, and twist in a plastic corn holder into each end of each ear. Microwave until done to your taste. (Microwave time will depend the power of your microwave oven, the number of ears you are cooking at once, and your taste.)

Me
added about 1 year ago

This time of year, I microwave corn at least a couple of times a week. I leave the husks on, and have best results when I cut of the ends of any excess stalk or husks so that the table in the microwave will turn. I find that if the table stays stationary, I get spots on the corn where it cooks too much. The power of your microwave will also dictate the time. I used to have one that required as much as 4 minutes per ear. The one I have now is 2 minutes. When I had to cook them longer, I also flipped them over half way through the cooking. Otherwise the kernels on the bottom could get a little waterlogged which affected the texture. Now that I have a more powerful microwave, I just zap for 2 min per ear and I'm done. May sound like a lot of work, but it really isn't. Beats stovetop any night of the week for me. Especially if I've got a few more dishes coming together (or not) for dinner.