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My clafoutis was totally raw in the middle after 35 minutes of baking.

My clafoutis was totally raw in the middle after 35 minutes of baking. The edges rose up 3-inches and browned well - how did the middle stay raw? I started with the oven at 425 and lowered to 375 once I slid the dish into the oven.

asked by sstiavetti 10 months ago
12 answers 751 views
Stringio
added 10 months ago

Once I was baking a loaf of raisin cinnamon bread and couldn't figure out why it was pale on the outside and barely cooked on the inside, despite doing the same thing last week which resulted in a beautifully burnished, fluffy loaf. Turns out that my oven broke in the middle of baking and just stopped generating heat. Perhaps you can check that your oven is fully operational?

Instagram1
added 10 months ago

That's not it - I have two oven thermometers and both registered within 25 degrees of the right temp. So baffling!!

Baci1
HalfPint

HalfPint is a trusted home cook.

added 10 months ago

The temperature sounds high, especially at the start. Also the time is a bit short. Most clafoutis recipes that I've seen usually bakes at 350F until cooked for about 45-60 minutes. By the end of this baking time, the clafoutis is nice and browned.

That blast of initial heat seems to be cooking the top and edges too quickly before the middle.

Instagram1
added 10 months ago

HalfPint, Actually sorry, I also made gougers yesterday, and that's the recipe I was thinking of with the temp change. The clafoutis was baked at 350 the whole time. I was following Dorie Greenspan's recipe from Around My French Table, which has had many positive reviews. Do you have another recipe you'd recommend?

Baci1
HalfPint

HalfPint is a trusted home cook.

added 10 months ago

@sstiavetti, I'm confused. Are you trying to make clafoutis or gougeres?

Instagram1
added 10 months ago

Clafoutis.

Baci1
HalfPint

HalfPint is a trusted home cook.

added 10 months ago

Ok. So I looked at the recipe and the only thing that I could guess is that you might have had too much fruit. I had a similar problem with a fig tart that was cooked on the outside and top, but the center was still raw. I think it was because I had too much fruit and it kept the batter from cooking.

2013-09-09_13.45.37
added 10 months ago

You may already know that the size and nature of a pan are often the culprit if low temperature or hot and cold spots in oven are not to blame. A glass lasagna pan will set clafoutis in less time than a light-colored metal pan measuring 8 inches by 8 inches if the latter is specified. An oblong, glazed gratin differs from a wide, circular cast-iron skillet and so on. If you were more generous with your cherries and raspberries than Dorie Greenspan was with hers or threw large chunks of fruit straight from the freezer in before pouring in batter, your timing will also differ. Sometimes, who knows? That's why glass doors on ovens are so useful. Custards will continue cooking a little when you take them out of the oven, so you don't want to put them back in the oven too long if they are not set in specified time. In any case, I'd trust Dorie Greenspan, though you might find insight by comparing your recipe with others.

Instagram1
added 10 months ago

HalfPint, I actually added a little less fruit than it called for - just enough to barely cover the bottom of the baking dish. And I used sliced kumquats, which were relatively dry. More dry than cherries, I would think. :)

Eliz, I baked it in a 2 quart soufflé dish - which should be pretty effective for baking, don't you think? I've never had a problem baking soufflés in this very same dish.

I am utterly baffled. I may may it again just to see if I have the same problem.

Instagram1
added 10 months ago

This is the dish I used: http://eatre.al/1ihC4ny

2013-09-09_13.45.37
added 10 months ago

Aha! Does the original recipe provide dimensions for baking dish? You need a much wider surface without tall sides. A shallow gratin dish or something like a lasagna pan--but not as long--is preferable. There's only a little flour to thicken the batter and no leavening agents other than the eggs themselves, so your batter needs to spread out rather than rise up dramatically. Check online for photographs of clafoutis and you'll see the dessert looks more like an eggy pancake than a soufflé.

Instagram1
added 10 months ago

AAaahh!! Thanks! It doesn't seem to specify, but this makes sense. Thanks for your help. :)