🔔

less than a minute ago

540434_3765129049943_1219987725_n

Marian Bull favorited

Gjkzf-2lgbfx7qeia0tfjdhf9zhi7k6m3g1zcflqp16i_yjflqpzzcnyqgvsazhwy59fk9c_tuykwi9whqojra=s265-c

Porcelain Enamelware Cups

Kbxii8nr_pdq9rtycocxmvj4vaggtbj_a2cidi63ddwnvcl9p2irw5ye3moumv3kvuoclmtptcu6sujzow1v=s265-c

Porcelain Enamelware Cups

Us0v_xjpqqsc3--0qtkgjhkkx4jv11wq1cb8-o2ofj0labodtpjdbmbulls6thvatwr43qdcm9sxqovgpi73=s265-c

Sankaku Japanese Bandana

Cutgalette2

Slab Galette with Swiss Chard and Gruyère

Loading…
🔎

My Basket ()

All questions

I'm looking for a thorough resource on tofu - something that goes beyond Asian-inspired recipes. I'm interested in not only recipes but how I can use it as a replacement in creamy dishes, in place of eggs as binder, etc. Also, something that doesn't cater to just vegetarians and vegans. I still love meat; I'm just trying to eat less of it. Book or website would be great. Thanks!

asked by WannabeBaker over 3 years ago
3 answers 323 views
036
aargersi

Abbie is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 3 years ago

The vegetarian times is a great resource:

http://www.vegetariantimes...

I would recommend you buy a few types of tofu - extra firm to soft, and start experimenting. I love it, and use it a lot not as "fake meat" but in it' own right, as tofu. Will try to post a few more recipes out here, too.

Scan0004
added over 3 years ago

Contemporary books that have a vast choice of tofu recipes: How to Cook Everything Vegetarian (Mark Bittman), Passionate Vegetarian (Crescent Dragonwagon) -- vegetarian, yes, but you can really get the hang of it from them. The classic book that really told Americans what tofu is about: The Book of Tofu (Shurtlett & Aoyagi) -- 500 recipes, and lots of text, crosses over East and West.
Someone else might have tofu + meat suggestions. Only thing I can add is making lasagna with tofu "ricotta" -- meat sauce optional.

Scan0004
added over 3 years ago

I expected to see a little more guidance from omnivores on foodpickle, so here I am again. An easy way to play around is via blogs. You can use "Food Blog Search" (www.foodblogsearch.com) to find things that interest you, on sites where the blogger is not necessarily a vegetarian, just eating what tastes (and looks) good.
Good suggestions from aargersi. Another note, if you're not used to using tofu: it is perishable, so if you use less than a full portion, take the remaining unused tofu, put it in a storage container with a lid, cover it with water and store with the lid on in the refrigerator. If you haven't used it in 2 days, change the water. Use in a reasonable time -- you really don't want to know what happens when it goes bad!
Another trick for dealing with the unfamiliar: make a good marinade, cut the tofu in cubes (1/2' or 1 inch), and let it drink it in, refrigerated. You can take these cubes and sear them to make crisp surfaces (use for sandwiches, with rice and veg,for instance), or put them uncooked (the tofu is really already cooked and ready to eat) in salads (something like marinated mozzarella balls). If you have some left, just keep it in the marinade -- good for at least a week.
As you use it, get comfortable with it, see what you like, you may notice that you see it showing up more, and that you think of more simple ways to use it.