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I've come into a windfall of chestnuts. Any ideas?

asked by Hilarybee over 5 years ago
9 answers 990 views
E58ba5ae ebb0 417e 8137 d75e19fe35b2  dscn0146 1
added over 5 years ago

I think they are delicious when you roast them with brussel sprouts (if you are into that sort of thing) I love Smitten Kitchen's recipe: http://bit.ly/6C68L9

B3038408 42c1 4c18 b002 8441bee13ed3  new years kitchen hlc only
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 5 years ago

Jam, scented with vanilla! ;o)

73cd846c b69c 41fe 8f8b 7a3aa8dd3b93  desert
added over 5 years ago

Being that were comming upon soup season I'm going to suggest chestnut soup. This seemed to be very popular in England around the holliday season.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added over 5 years ago

Thanskgiving is not that far away, and one of the best dishes I have ever made is a chestnut, bread and cranberry stuffing (not in the bird of course).

Fff96a46 7810 4f5c a452 83604ac1e363  dsc03010
added over 5 years ago

Send some to me? Problem solved!

67da29df 0253 44dd 98a1 250b49e519a4  hilary sp1
added over 5 years ago

betteirene, do you live in the Central US? I found my chestnuts while on a hike. It took me several hikes to re-identify the tree to ensure that it wasn't just a Buckeye. (I live in Ohio). I used this guide to help me:
http://www.extension.umn...

I just foraged them. Nobody was looking, it was a public park. I figured it was okay.

PPS: Do not try to eat horse chestnuts or buckeyes. Not tasty.

Fff96a46 7810 4f5c a452 83604ac1e363  dsc03010
added over 5 years ago

How lucky you are! I'm in a suburb of Seattle. The park on the corner has a couple of trees that make beautiful very plump chestnuts of the horse variety. I wish they were edible.

If I'm using the oven for something else, I'll roast a pan full of chestnuts. Otherwise, I boil or steam them. I keep a bowl of them on the kitchen table during late fall/early winter. The only other thing I've done with them is add them to stuffing, but everyone's suggestions sound so yummy that I will probably try them.



8bbce907 3b5e 4c8c be5c c64e6c780d63  birthday 2012
luvcookbooks

Meg is a trusted home cook.

added over 5 years ago

this is on the far edge of sanity, but i hope someone out there will try making roasted chestnut flour. read about it in the lost ravioli of hoboken and can't get it out of my mind. unable to travel to italy to purchase some from the mountain farm at the moment. great book by laura schenone, she has a blog, too.

67da29df 0253 44dd 98a1 250b49e519a4  hilary sp1
added over 5 years ago

I'm not sure I'll be making any flour. But it could be as simple as pulverizing them in the food processor.

I've roasted some and served it in a brussel sprout and butternut squash panzanella. I'm toying with the idea of making chestnut cream.