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What can I substitute for taro root?

asked by a Whole Foods Market Customer about 3 years ago
1 answer 6471 views
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added about 3 years ago

according to foodsubs.com (cooks thesaurus):
taro = taro root = dasheen = coco = cocoyam = eddo = Japanese potato = baddo = elephant's ear = old cocoyam = sato-imo Pronunciation: TAHR-oh Notes: If you've sampled poi at a Hawaiian luau, then you're already familiar with taro. Many people don't think much of poi, but taro can be served far more advantageously. It has an interesting, nutty flavor, and it's quite good in stews or soups, or deep-fat fried or roasted. In its raw state, it can be toxic and harsh on the skin, so wear gloves or oil your hands when handling it, and always cook it before serving it. Substitutes: malanga OR parsnip OR sweet potato OR yam OR new potatoes
hope that helps.