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A question about a recipe: Sunday Pork Ragu. Do you measure the parsley before or after chopping? Thank you. ;o)

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I have a question about the recipe "Sunday Pork Ragu" from cookinginvictoria.

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

asked about 3 years ago
6 answers 1681 views
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added about 3 years ago

It is much easier (in my experience) to measure any fresh herbs before chopping. 1 Tbsp of packed parsley leaves will turn into 1 Tbsp of chopped parsley.

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sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 3 years ago

I chop then measure simply because its easier to measure accurately.I find it difficult to pack unchopped herbs into a measuring spoon or cup.

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added about 3 years ago

The way the recipe reads, you measure then chop. If it read "1/2 cup chopped parsley" that would mean you need to chop and then measure.

Dscn3274
added about 3 years ago

I'm with sdebrango...I always chop first and try to keep it clear in any recipe that I post.

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pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added about 3 years ago

I'll just add that I never measure herbs like parsley. I just chop and slam it in there. I mean how far wrong can you go?

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AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 3 years ago

pierino, you're right. The way I chop, half a cup of chopped is a lot more than 1/2 cup of flat leaf parsley before chopping. But then, for something like this, you're right. You can never have too much parsley in a sauce. And you'd be pleased to know that I added a fistful of chopped Chinese celery leaves . . . the nice dark ones with that good, deep celery flavor. Couldn't help myself. Had to add some pounded fennel seed, too, because Ratto's doesn't do their Italian sausage justice in this regard. Thanks, everyone!! ;o)