Saurkraut Pierogi

By • April 1, 2011 • 0 Comments



Author Notes: My dad grew up with his Polish born grandmother living with him periodically. She was know for her toughness, green thumb, and culinary wizardry. My dad gets a faraway look when he describes her saurkraut pierogis, kapusta, and golumpkis in perfect detail. The dough is rich but not thick or tough. The filling is sharp but still mellow. He doesn't remember if she made her own saurkraut but since she used to run a speakeasy with homemade bathtub gin, I'd be willing to bet she did! He also recalls that they were very peppery (which he loved). I have been trying to re-create his taste memory and have been getting closer. testkitchenette

Serves 6 as appetizers

Saurkraut Filling, Polish

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 2 cups best quality saurkraut, drained and chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, more to taste
  • grindings of black pepper, more to taste
  1. Heat oil in a skillet over medium-high heat and saute onion until just starting to get some color. Add saurkraut, salt, pepper, and saute for another 2-5 minutes. Taste and correct for seasoning. Set aside to cool

Dough

  • 3 eggs
  • 1-8 ounce container sour cream
  • 3 cups all purpose un-bleached flour
  • 1 sprig baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  1. In a bowl, beat eggs and sour cream until smooth. Sift flour, baking powder, and salt into sour cream mixture and mix until dough comes together.
  2. Knead on lightly floured board until firm and smooth. Wrap in plastic and chill for 30 minutes.
  3. Divide dough in half and roll our to 1/8" thick and cut into 3-4" circles. Sometimes, cut squares to not waste any dough. Place a tablespoon or so of filling into each round and seal with wet fingers.
  4. Bring a large pot of water to boil and cook pierogi a few at a time, until the rise to to top. Then pan fry them in some butter. Serve with sour cream or applesauce.

Tags: comfort food

Comments (0) Questions (0)

Default-small
Default-small