Okonomiyaki

By • June 7, 2011 • 450 Comments



Author Notes: I went to Japan about 10 years ago and while I ate some seriously amazing things, I’d be hard-pressed to remember exactly what they were. That is, except for okonomiyaki, which I first tasted in a cramped corner shop in Kyoto that sold only these delicious savory pancakes. When I came home, my friend Becky – a fellow okonomiyaki nut -- and I tried to replicate the recipe to satisfy our cravings. This is by no means authentic and there are a ton of variations, but it sure hits the spot. - MidgeMidge

Food52 Review: Eggy and crisp, Midge's Kyoto-style pancakes are studded with plump morsels of tender shrimp and threaded through with ribbons of cabbage and rings of scallion. The savory batter is enriched with a dash of sesame oil and soy sauce, and the accompanying soy and sriracha mayo is a zippy accent -- we tore off bite-sized pieces of pancake and dunked them in the sauce before gobbling them down. - A&MA&M

Makes roughly a dozen pancakes depending on their size

Sauce

  • 1/2 cup mayonnaise
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 2 teaspoons sriracha, more or less to taste

Pancakes

  • 5 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/3 cup AP flour
  • 2 cups cabbage, shredded with a mandoline or finely chopped
  • 1 bunch scallions, trimmed and chopped
  • 3/4 cups (roughly) baby or chopped shrimp
  • canola oil for frying
  • 1-2 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds
  • bonito flakes (optional)
  1. Whisk the first set of ingredients together and voila, your sauce. Set aside while you make the pancakes.
  2. In a large mixing bowl, whisk eggs with the soy sauce, sesame oil, and salt. Gradually add the flour until incorporated. Fold in cabbage, scallions, and shrimp.
  3. Warm a couple glugs of canola oil in a skillet over medium-high heat until glistening. Ladle the batter into the skillet as you would for regular old pancakes. I usually make them about the size of saucer. Cook on each side for about 3 minutes or until golden brown. Keep pancakes covered in a warm oven as you make the rest. Scatter sesame seeds and/or bonito flakes on top of pancakes and serve with dipping sauce and a cold pilsner.
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Tags: japanese, savory

Comments (450) Questions (14)

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3 days ago Etta Baurhenn

omg! Can't stop smacking my lips. So very good. thanks!

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3 days ago Hana Link

These are fantastic. I will make them again and again!

My_catering_(2)

13 days ago Aliwaks

Oh and I want to try these with Oysters.

My_catering_(2)

13 days ago Aliwaks

I made these on Friday, they were delicious! I added a few garlic scapes because I had them. There was dipping sauce leftover & we brushed on corn then grilled .. it was awesome.

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12 days ago Midge

Thanks Aliwaks! Let me know how the oysters go, sounds really good.

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27 days ago JohnL

Bull Dog brand makes an Okonomiyaki sauce; it comes in a small plastic squeeze bottle and is dark and fruity sweet with a texture like oyster sauce ($5). I still much prefer Chinese egg foo young which I make in a 10-inch electric skillet and get perfect results using a 4-inch metal cookie cutter ring to pour each pancake into, removing the ring as each poured cake begins to set up. 4 cakes per recipe, and it's a real pig-out for one person. But I crave it every now & again. Have tried this Okonomiyaki recipe and also the one I found in 1972 New York Times Heritage Cookbook by Jean Hewitt. But given a choice, I would have egg food young every time.

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27 days ago emcsull

so let's have the foo yung recipe already !!

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20 days ago JohnL

emcsull I just uploaded my egg foo young recipe. Enjoy!

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20 days ago emcsull

just might make that for lunch today, thanks so much !

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5 days ago Debra

I've been looking for a really old fashioned egg foo young recipe like when I was a child. I think this may be it! Thank you, can't wait to try it!

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5 days ago emcsull

and great it was, let me tell you ! I did the first sauce.

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27 days ago Beverly

This sounds delicious, but can you tell me what AP flour is?

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27 days ago emcsull

oh no, here we go again ! All Purpose, I didn't know either !

Mlt_yogateau_1

about 1 month ago mtrelaun

This is one of those recipes that can be adapted to suit what you have on hand. I swapped leeks for scallions, and harissa for sriracha, and it all tasted delicious. Thanks, @Midge!

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2 months ago edwin cohen

I had Okonomiyaki on my menu if you look at the cabbage as a slaw that is to say use red green and finely shredded carrots it make this dish much more beautiful. Also if you leave it a little more coursely cut it will stay a little more crispy. The treditional way can be a little soggy and limp. Oh and never slime them with kewpie mayo.

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3 months ago Ellen Smith Hogan

I've been looking for recipes to use up what's left in the winter garden. There are 2 rows of cabbage left out there, rows of spring onions, and snow peas. Also, I raise chickens, so, when I found this recipe, I said, "OK!" Then I read the comments! Holy Hootis! And watched Cooking with Dog! All very entertaining. And came back to Midge's version. Boy oh boy. I had no shrimp. Boo. But I used snow peas outta the garden. I can't eat sesame seeds, but guess what? That sauce she dreamed up is so freekin' delicious...who needs sesame seeds? The sesame oil in the batter is fragrant enough to deliver that note of sesame. All in all...wonderful. This was a grand lunch, I tell you. My dear farmer husband loved it. Even Daisy, aka Queenie, my DH's almost human cat, loved it without the sauce. Smitty, the blue heeler said, "Keep the cabbage, but give me more of that batter, please." Okay. This recipe is a keeper!

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3 months ago dryden

I love these. I have tweeked it many times and have settled on shredded spinach as a substitute for the cabbage and sauted shiitake mushrooms to substitiute for the shrimp as my favorite. Also I like equal parts of soy sauce and sriracha for the sauce, no mayo. Yum.

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3 months ago Okonomi_Yakity

Hi Tammy: If you are interested in an authentic okonomiyaki recipe, way back in the comment stream, I referenced http://okonomiyakiworld... which has authentic recipes for both Osaka style and Hiroshima style okonomiyaki and a load of information on ingredients, history, and so on. As Sara points out, this recipe is not very authentic - which is not to take anything away from it - it's still a great recipe!

Stringio

3 months ago Ann-Marie D. Nguyen-Shavurova

I wonder if this is the most commented article in all of food52!

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3 months ago tammy

Sara, many thanks, I want it to be authentic.

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3 months ago Sara

This might be tasty but it isn't an authentic okonomiyaki recipe. The sauce on okonomiyaki is tonkatsu sauce and mayonnaise (preferably the Japanese brand "Kewpie"). The batter is made with dashi and includes tempura bits called tenkasu.

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3 months ago Sara

Also, "real" okonomiyaki recipes, in Japan, don't use flour - they use a root called Nagaimo, though it can be hard to find here in the States.

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3 months ago taxidog

Wow was this good! I had everything but the shrimp on hand but will definitely get some for next time. Thanks for this recipe. BTW, Alton Brown's recipes often called for AP flour on "Good Eats". Surprising to see these reactions to a simple abbreviation-there isn't much snarkiness on this site. That's one of the things I love about it.

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3 months ago Sharon

Sssshhh....please don't mention AP again.

Rscn0786

3 months ago ChuckB

;-)

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2 months ago Toni

What is AP flour?

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about 1 month ago Ed Foreman

all purpose

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about 1 month ago Toni

Thanks

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3 months ago MKM

Love the recipes on the site, but cannot access ingredients as the photo covers the beginning of the list. I go to other sites and figure it out but how do I eliminate that obstruction?

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3 months ago asshueco

I always use BS flour and LMAO eggs for JAPANESE recipys

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3 months ago Sharon

You are TOO cute. LOL.

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3 months ago tammy

I was in Japan ten yrs ago also and had these. Been looking for the recipe ever since. Thank you so much. Tammy

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4 months ago LeeLeeBee

This recipe has become one of our go-to weeknight staples - it's SO good. Last week, we tried the okonomiyaki at Xiao Bao Biscuit in Charleston, which get rave reviews, but we like these better!

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3 months ago Midge

Thanks so much LeeLeeBee! I live in Charleston and Xiao Bao is one of my favorite restaurants. Their okonomiyaki is way different than this recipe I think, but different-amazing all the same

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3 months ago Midge

What I meant to say that it's amazing and I can never resist ordering it but I still make this at home.

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4 months ago Diane

Hello everyone~~This is my first time at this site, and I must say, I've never read so many rude comments. I would love to make this, and after reading all of the comments about the shrimp, where exactly does it state in the directions just how to do it? Thank you

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4 months ago TiggyBee

Hi Diane - just add the already cooked shrimp to the batter. If you're using bay shrimp, normally it's sold cooked. Whatever protein you decide to use, make sure it's already cooked. This is a wonderfully forgiving recipe as well as one that lends itself to your own creativity. Rude comments, that's the internet! This is generally a lovely community. Stay awhile.

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4 months ago TiggyBee

I should add that I've also made this with really big tiger prawns that I just chopped up raw and they cooked just fine, added to the batter. Hope this helps!

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4 months ago Sharon

Welcome, Diane! This is a wonderful site so don't be scared off. Any unpleasantness was generated by the rude comments of only TWO PEOPLE. As in society at large, that's all it takes. Hopefully, they have been chased off and we can all enjoy exchanging ideas about what we all love....food and cooking!