Ann Seranne's Rib Roast of Beef

By • December 16, 2011 • 85 Comments

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Author Notes: This is the ultimate make-ahead, perfectly cooked rib roast -- an utterly genius recipe from "Ann Seranne's Recipe for a Perfect Roast: Put it in the Oven and Relax", The New York Times, July 28, 1966. Note: Don't attempt this recipe if your oven isn't well-insulated (that is, if it's extremely hot to the touch when it's in use).Genius Recipes

Makes 2 servings per rib

  • One 2- to 4-rib roast of beef, weighing 4½ to 12 pounds
  • Flour
  • Salt & freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 to 1 cup beef stock or broth (optional, if making pan gravy)
  1. Remove the roast from the refrigerator 2 1/2 to 4 hours before cooking.
  2. Preheat the oven to 500 degrees.
  3. Place the roast in an open, shallow roasting pan, fat side up. Sprinkle with a little flour, and rub the flour into the fat lightly. Season all over with salt and pepper.
  4. Put the roast in the preheated oven and roast according to the roasting chart at the end of the slideshow above, timing the minutes exactly. (This works out to be 15 minutes per rib, or approximately five minutes cooking time per pound of trimmed, ready-to-cook roast.) When cooking time is finished, turn off the oven. Do not open the door at any time.
  5. Allow the roast to remain in the oven until oven is lukewarm, or about two hours. The roast will still have a crunchy brown outside and an internal heat suitable for serving as long as 4 hours after removing from the oven.
  6. Note: To make a thin pan gravy, remove excess fat from the meat drippings, leaving any meat pieces in the pan. Stir in 1/2 to 1 cup beef stock or broth. Bring to the boil, scraping the bottom of the pan to loosen the meat pieces. Simmer for one minute and season to taste.
  7. Note: Don't attempt this recipe if your oven isn't well-insulated (that is, if it's extremely hot to the touch when it's in use). Since ovens vary in their insulation, to be safe, you may want to rig up a probe thermometer or other oven-safe thermometer you can read without opening the oven door, and pull the roast out if it reaches the desired degree of doneness early.
Jump to Comments (85)

Comments (85) Questions (14)

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3 months ago michael

We had a dinner party last night, I had printed the recipe months ago and cooked this yesterday afternoon. I turned out perfect, very delicious, every raved about it and wanted the recipe! thank you!

Stringio

8 months ago Ana Teresa Ball

I agree with leaving it only 1 hour time after you turn off the oven. That is what I did and got the most perfect medium rare Prim Rib you can imagine. Next time I will try it with kosher salt. Thank you very much for this recipe. It really is genius!!

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8 months ago David Braithwaite

If you do the 500-525 well preheated oven with meat at room temp and give it ONLY one hour exactly after the 5 minutes per pound EXACTLY, it will work every time. I agree, the two hours recommended above is too long. Stick to the one hour exactly after tuning off the oven. Then remove it and let it rest.

Gregopenskytomatomania

8 months ago Sippity Sup (Greg Henry)

I'm a pretty good cook. But this recipe failed me. Horribly. GREG

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8 months ago Ann

Please share what happened that the recipe failed you.

Mirrors

8 months ago Don Roszel

I too would like to know what happened. This recipe worked well for me. I did read all the comments before I tried it. Oven temp is important! I also used the temp probe that's built into my oven as a backup.

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12 months ago Ann

RONDA...I agree...I too have had great success with this method...I can only think that one or more of the following points are not being adhered to:
1. Oven must be very well insulated..when at 500F you should be able to put your hand on the outside door without burning it
2. If you are not sure that your oven can reach 500F buy an oven thermometer that can register higher than 500F..turn your oven on to 500F on the dial and when the oven beeps compare the temp to the thermometer. That will tell you whether your oven is calibrated correctly...or if the thermometer registers higher than 500F then you know your oven is too hot which might explain the well done beef.
3. If the rib roast is still very cold and has not been out of
the fridge long enough
4. Knowing the exact weight of the rib roast in order to calculate the amount of time to.roast @500F. Even though the butcher or the label tells me a weight I still weigh the beef on my digital kitchen scale.

Hope some of these points help those who have not had success with this method.

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12 months ago Rhonda35

I don't know why people are having difficulty with this recipe. I've used it time and again and in three different ovens - never had a problem. Even this Christmas, when my son didn't read the giant sign taped to the oven that said "Do not open!" and opened the oven door, it still turned out perfectly. Medium rare (except the very ends) and so juicy. Sorry to see that others have not had the same luck. Maybe in 2014!!

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12 months ago MsDivinaLoca

Unless you're willing to try out this recipe in advance to make sure it will work with your oven, I cannot recommend it. I used it for last year's NYE dinner and it was unevenly cooked - mostly undercooked and I followed the method to the letter. I'm pretty sure that it was related to the oven I was using, but I have no wish to buy another roast to experiment.

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12 months ago Ann

This looks exactly like the rib roast we had on
Christmas! The result was spectacular! Medium rare throughout. My 2-rib piece weighed 4.5 lbs. After 3 hours at air conditioned room temp (in Honolulu) oven heat temp @500F...roasted for 25 minutes. Turned off the oven and two hours later removed it and dinner was served! I will always roast beef this magical nofuss way!

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12 months ago cucina di mammina

I too made this rib roast for christmas day and it was woefully well done vs. medium rare as we wished (vey flavorful however. I will try the method below, thank you glasshalfmd for sharing the update on cooking temps for this gorgeous cut of meat.

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12 months ago glasshalfmd

I commented here last Christmas about how this recipe yielded a heartbreakingly overcooked rib roast for me. I was mystified, given that for many this is a foolproof technique, and I'm an experienced cook. But I believe that it may have been the result of the fact that mine was a six-week dry-aged roast, so much of the water weight that insulates a fresh roast was missing, resulting in a roast that cooked much faster. I would caution all against using this recipe for a dry-aged roast. This year I roasted according to a technique that's gaining popularity; you'll see it in Heston Blumenthal's book and also in a recipe by Kenji Lopez-Alt in his Food Lab column on Serious Eats. You put your roast in as low an oven as possible (ideally 200 degrees) and wait 3-4 hours until it comes to an internal temperature of 125 for medium rare. (Test frequently at the 3-hour point.) Then you let the meat rest for an hour (the perfect time to cook a gratin dauphinois!). Finally you return the roast at 550 degrees for 8 minutes to create a beautiful crust. The concept here is to maximize the proportion of the roast that is perfectly medium rare and to minimize a grey, well-done perimeter. When you brown the meat first, the water in the surface slows down the Maillard reaction (the crust-forming chemical process), so by the time a crust forms, you have a layer of overcooked meat beneath it. A roast that is already cooked develops a beautiful crust very quickly when you make browning your final step. This year's roast was just superb.

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12 months ago Ronnie Maiden

Makes sense to me. Mine was fresh, not dry aged.

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12 months ago Ronnie Maiden

I made this tonight. I used an oven thermometer to make certain of the oven temp as my oven is a little temperamental ( I have to turn it off and on again the first time it indicates that is pre-heated as it isn't hot enough). I cooked a 4.95 lb. roast, I didn't get it cradled, and I followed the directions EXACTLY. After the two hours, I put in the micro wave to rest while I finished every thing else (Yorkshire pudding, gravy, etc.). It was perfectly rare, all the way through, and the outside had a lovely brown crust around it. I do understand why many have double ovens, though, as I had to juggle cooking different things, after the roast had been removed. I highly recommend this recipe.

Stringio

12 months ago ibwebb

http://www.instructables...
Try this for a perfect one everytime (IMHO)!

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12 months ago Robin6055

I used this recipe today for my Xmas rib roast. The roast was cooked to a medium rare to very rare in the middle. I was cooking a5# roast. My concern was that it was room temperature at the end of the 2 hour rest in the oven. The recipe states that it will be warm enough to,serve for several hours after pulling it from the hour. This could, of course, be my oven temp. So I advise using an oven thermometer and a probe. Very flavorful, tender roast.

Stringio

12 months ago Tami Wittich

I have 4.5 lb beef tenderloin.. Can I use this method exactly as given w/ this cut?

Miglore

12 months ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

We've never tried it with a tenderloin, so I can't say for certain. This is a simple recipe we love for tenderloin: http://food52.com/recipes...

Others in this comment thread have modified the Seranne high heat method successfully for different cuts like boneless rib roasts and eye rounds, so you could try it, but I would suggest reading through their comments and using a probe thermometer to be able to monitor the internal temperature closely.

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12 months ago David Braithwaite

Absolutely. Try it with my herbs. But do take it out after the one hour to rest and do EXACTLY the five minutes per pound to the decimal! Don't open the oven door. Threaten anyone with their life if they get near the oven door. I did this with tenderloin for my brother's wedding and everyone said it was the best meat they'd ever eaten. I can't tell if you're at a high altitude from the comments but I don't have any idea how to adjust for that. Good luck!

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12 months ago JohnL

Craig Claiborne had a recipe for eye round of beef roast that used this basic method he got from Ann Serrane for roasts ranging 3 1/2 pounds up to 8 pounds. His directions were to cook the roast for exactly 4 or 5 minutes a pound (that's what he said) and then leave a smaller roast in the turned off oven for 1 1/2 hours or for 2 hours for large roast. I've always had excellent results with this recipe using rib roast.

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12 months ago David Braithwaite

I've been doing this for decades. I have a very good oven and maybe that is the ticket. Cook EXACTLY five minutes per pound at the highest temp your preheated oven will go, mine's 525 degrees. Turn it off and really, all you need is one hour. Take it out to rest while you do the rest of the meal. It comes out medium rare every time. And very little loss of juice, just fat. Even for one rib it works though a bit more like medium but totally juicy. If you want to get more flavor, mix chopped cilantro, tons of chopped fresh garlic, tons of tyme, rosemary, gobs of pepper and more salt than you think you should. Add olive oil and wrap with plastic and let sit in the fridge for days. Bring to room temp before cooking. Works even better with whole filet.

Mirrors

about 1 year ago Don Roszel

I've used this technique before, with excellent results. Only caveat is that you use the oven for the entire time. Not so big a deal if you have more than one oven, but for those of us with only one we're somewhat constrained as to other dishes that require time in the oven

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about 1 year ago Muse

I will try to make this for Christmas dinner this year. Thank you for sharing your recipe. Peace, Light and Love.

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almost 2 years ago Cmgrauer

can I cook a one rib roast with this recipe?

Miglore

almost 2 years ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

You could try it, reducing the cook time proportionally (see the chart above), but I'd strongly recommend a probe thermometer to keep track of the temperature (they're cheap!).

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almost 2 years ago Jcrater

Just made tonight for Christmas Eve. I was a little worried after reading some of the comments, but it was perfect!

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almost 3 years ago Windtryst

I cook all roasts like this, 5 min a pound works for me,if it is over 6 lbs. I go ti 6 min per pound . Works every time!

Stringio

almost 3 years ago marycatherine.harrison

We made this with for Christmas dinner this year. We didn't get in a golf game, but it did make for a relaxing Christmas afternoon! We made Yorkshire pudding as an accompaniment and a gravy with the pan juices (there aren't a ton) and demi glace...

Stringio

almost 3 years ago marycatherine.harrison

We made this with for Christmas dinner this year. We didn't get in a golf game, but it did make for a relaxing Christmas afternoon! We made Yorkshire pudding as an accompaniment and a gravy with the pan juices (there aren't a ton) and demi glace...

Stringio

almost 3 years ago marycatherine.harrison

We made this with for Christmas dinner this year. We didn't get in a golf game, but it did make for a relaxing Christmas afternoon! We made Yorkshire pudding as an accompaniment and a gravy with the pan juices (there aren't a ton) and demi glace...

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almost 3 years ago Helenegordon

With a bit of trepidation after reading all the comments below, I made this for our New Years Eve dinner
party. Had a 4 rib (8.8lb) roast, cooked for 45 min at 500. Was inspired to purchase a snake wire meat
probe and that is what saved the day (or night) At 1 1/2 hours, checked temp and it read 151 degrees so
took it out and let it rest for 1 1/2hour til serving. It was well done on the ends and wonderfully pink inside
winning raves from everyone including two British guests who certainly know their roast beef.
Also made Waverly's Mom's creamy horseradish sauce and sauteed mushrooms--enjoying the leftovers today!

Stringio

almost 3 years ago ibwebb

Sorry all! It said it didn't post the first time so I tried again and low and behold there it is twice!

Stringio

almost 3 years ago ibwebb

I am eager to try this.. I know that I have a similar type of recipe with Turkey from Alton Brown (my fav ..sorry all) that I have used for Thanksgiving for years now. I am the official turkey chef now as voted by my whole family LOL. Anyway, I had seen a few comments like I have read here about it being over done there. Alton (or one of the people that check on his comments) mentioned about using the meat probe (wireless or with the 'snake' wire) too, BUT I have noticed a trend in this that has me wondering and coming up with a theory. Sorry if I missed where this has been brought up already :

It seems that most of the people that have said it was overdone have newer, high efficiency, or convection ovens. When this recipe was developed these really didn't exist (or were very uncommon). The convection is meant to cook faster, so that is the obvious problem imho. Yet, the newer and high efficiency ovens are more insulated than the less expensive and much more than the older ones. I think this is what is leading to the over cooking issue! The ovens are holding in more heat. I would almost want to suggest taking a pound off the roast when looking at the chart to accommodate this insulation issue. PLEASE KEEP IN MIND I AM NOT A CHEF OR EXPERT though so do this at your own risk. I do cook all the time and get more than my fair share of compliments, but don't want to mislead anyone. Also, wonder if anyone has tried a coffee rub on this instead of the flour/salt/pepper? I know I have tried on several lesser cuts with huge success on the crust's flavor.

I can't wait to try this though.. with my very old oven I should have no trouble with this. HAPPY NEW YEAR to you all!

Stringio

almost 3 years ago ibwebb

I am eager to try this.. I know that I have a similar type of recipe with Turkey from Alton Brown (my fav ..sorry all) that I have used for Thanksgiving for years now. I am the official turkey chef now as voted by my whole family LOL. Anyway, I had seen a few comments like I have read here about it being over done there. Alton (or one of the people that check on his comments) mentioned about using the meat probe (wireless or with the 'snake' wire) too, BUT I have noticed a trend in this that has me wondering and coming up with a theory. Sorry if I missed where this has been brought up already :

It seems that most of the people that have said it was overdone have newer, high efficiency, or convection ovens. When this recipe was developed these really didn't exist (or were very uncommon). The convection is meant to cook faster, so that is the obvious problem imho. Yet, the newer and high efficiency ovens are more insulated than the less expensive and much more than the older ones. I think this is what is leading to the over cooking issue! The ovens are holding in more heat. I would almost want to suggest taking a pound off the roast when looking at the chart to accommodate this insulation issue. PLEASE KEEP IN MIND I AM NOT A CHEF OR EXPERT though so do this at your own risk. I do cook all the time and get more than my fair share of compliments, but don't want to mislead anyone. Also, wonder if anyone has tried a coffee rub on this instead of the flour/salt/pepper? I know I have tried on several lesser cuts with huge success on the crust's flavor.

I can't wait to try this though.. with my very old oven I should have no trouble with this. HAPPY NEW YEAR to you all!

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almost 3 years ago car24999

Unlike most, I like my meat medium instead of medium rare. What adjustment should I make to have it cooked medium?

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almost 3 years ago Cfm5555

OMG. Have a GE Profile Oven. As soon as I turned off the 500; the Oven began VENTING itself to cool down. Called GE. "Oh the engineers designed it that way cause too many complaints that it stayed hot too long" $ 80 Rib roast ruined.... Trying turning it back on at 200 for 1 hour and see what happens.
I HATE ALL our GE profile appliances from the dishwasher that doesn't, to the "automatic water level" washer that doesn't use enough water to rinse the soap, and thh Fridge that half melts and defrosts the ice through the "through the door" ice dispender every couple weeks... Rant over!

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almost 3 years ago poodles

Just tried this. With a $78 roast, four ribs worth. Followed directions to a T. It was a TOTAL bust. Thankfully, I didn't try it for company. Just my husband and myself looking forward to some leftovers for hash.

The meat came out bloody, almost raw and actually cool. Crust never formed into anything of matter either. Looks like I'll be doing a bit of grinding tomorrow and turning it all into meatloaf/hash fixings or maybe even dog food. Major (expensive) bummer. Never again.

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almost 3 years ago danjr

I did a 5lb rib roast,by my old method.took roast out of fridge for three hours prior to roasting.pre heated oven to 500 degs.rubbed with salt pepper and garlic did not use floor.put meat on roasting rake over roasting pan.put meat in for 5mins tuned oven down to 350,set timer for 1hr20mins(20mins per lb)for rare140 degrees.so i thought.accidently turn oven off.didnt relize for an hour that the oven was off.I tuned oven back on,reset temp to 350.added 1hr to timer back to original 1hr 20mins.have over cooked meat in the past,so was really nervous,took out at 120 internal temp to allow for resting,temp only went up 5 deg put roast back in for 15mins,then removed let rest 30mins.it came out perfect light red all the through with no blood.will try ann serrans method next year but will check after an hour and a half,hate well done prime rib

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almost 3 years ago jbj3114

I made this last night. After reading all the comments, I was a bit nervous. We live in the back country at 7000. feet, and if I ruined that $120.00 roast, our holiday meal was going to be meatless. However it was delicious....... I looked at my 4 rib roast from the small end of the ribs. It weighted 5.76 lbs. One hour at 500 degrees was going to do serious damage. I use my mother's 1936 "Joy of Cooking' there is a similar recipe in it. You calculate the cooking time, by the pound to including the searing time. You sear the meat at 500 degrees for 20 to 30 minutes the turn the oven down to 300 degrees, I decided to use the best of both recipes. I seared for 30 minutes, then turned the oven off, and waited for 1 1/2 hours. (Total cooking time - 2 hours for my roast)

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almost 3 years ago Charles Abinante

Glashalfmd- Where do you buy your meat that it costs so much? $260 for a 12# raost? Wow.....

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almost 3 years ago Fried Rice

OH Yeah! Cant wait to try it. Thanks Happy New Year to you all :)

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almost 3 years ago msgruvn

i only let the 2 rib, dry-aged roast come to room temp for an 1 1/2 hr. it was perfect! went with the 15 min per rib- i forgot to flour it, but it was fabulous anyway-nice and brown, crispy fat cap and juicy pink inside. (be sure the fan is on)

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almost 3 years ago Sherry Poole

I love the idea of this recipe... and after reading all the comments I will try it this weekend. I am a new member of this site... I cook all the time and each holiday I try a new recipe. I don't know how I was lucky enough to find you but am oh so glad that I did. I love the idea of not having to "baby" the meat while it is cooking.

Me

almost 3 years ago TheWimpyVegetarian

I made this tonight for dinner for a large crowd. I loved the crust, and loved the simplicity of it. I agree with AJ that the aroma of the crust about an hour after turning off the heat is just amazing. Unfortunately, mine was seriously underdone, and I needed to turn the heat back on - BUT, I spaced on the fact that I should have adjusted for high altitude. We're at 7000 feet above sea level. So my recommendation for high altitude cooking is to add 10 minutes to the blasting stage for a 7 lb roast.

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almost 3 years ago DGCook

Update on my experience with this method. I made two 12# standing ribs roasts for Christmas using this method. According to the directions, I blasted each roast for an hour prior to the rest period. One of ovens has a convection roast setting and I used this setting on the electric oven. The gas oven just has a normal bake setting.

I was disappointed with the outcome. The roast that was cooked with convection roast was seriously overdone. The roast that was cooked in the gas oven with just the bake setting was slightly better, but still not rare-medium rare.

I had temperature probes in both ovens so I was able to monitor the results without opening the oven door. The problem is that by the time you figure out that the meat is going to be overcooked it is too late to change your plans. I started the roasts at noon and invited my guests for 3:00p.m. I planned to remove the roasts from the oven at 3:30, let them "rest" at room temp for 30 minutes and serve at 4:00p.m.

In hindsight, I would not recommend using a convection/roast or a convection setting. I should have realized that this was just going to accelarate the cooking process. Duh! I should also have monitored the temperature of the meat more closely. As it was rising, I should have just removed it from the oven. This might have saved it.

Becky

almost 3 years ago rpenovich

Update on the method as used for boneless eye of round: it worked! But with some timing adjustments. I roasted 3.5 pounds at 475 degrees F for 7 minutes per pound. (oven was preheated to 500 when roast went in.) After 21 minutes of high temp roasting, I turned the oven off and left roast in for 2 1/2 hours.) Meat was slightly more cooked than medium rare (good for my husband, but I wanted more pink.) Trick is to slice this cheaper cut of meat very, very thinly. Served with au jus from the roast, family loved it.

Dsc_0015

almost 3 years ago stinkycheese

This recipe worked perfectly for my 6.5 lb roast. I admit it was scary trying this for the first time, but the faith paid off. I will use this method from now on for rib roast.

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almost 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

What really surprised me (very pleasantly) about this recipe was how you could smell the crust about an hour after turning off the heat, and then that beautiful smell just got more and more intense until we took it out of the oven. So, so good. ;o)

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almost 3 years ago cartjames

I read about this method about a year ago and have been using it for all kinds of roasts and it
works perfectly every time. It will make even the cheapest cut of meat melt in your mouth!
For those who are unsure about their oven, I suggest trying it on a less expensive roast first to
garner some experience.

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almost 3 years ago glasshalfmd

I ruined a $260 rib roast, beautifully dry-aged for me by Dickson's (Manhattan dwellers will feel my pain), by using this recipe. I'm a very experienced cook with a very good and reliable oven, and I certainly know how to cook a rib roast to a perfect rare-to-medium rare. But I thought I'd give this recipe a try, since I've been aware of it for a while, and its arrival on Food52, plus a few enthusiastic comments, led me to feel that its time had come. Well, I followed the recipe to a tee and ended up with 160-degree meat. Ugh. I'm glad this recipe has worked for others, but I must say that it doesn't make great sense, especially for a larger roast: how can blasting anything at 500 for an hour (as I did with a four-rib roast weighing 12lbs) result in anything but a perimeter of overcooked meat? And unless this recipe works truly perfectly every time, for every size roast, the fact that you can't check its temperature along the way (which would have saved my poor meat) poses something of a problem. Anyway, this resulted in dramatically overcooked meat that was a major, and very expensive, disappointment.

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

almost 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Oh, how sad! What you say makes perfect sense, about overcooking the outside of the roast by blasting it for a full hour. I too had a lot (relatively speaking) at stake, and was concerned about my oven being particularly energy-efficient in its insulation, thus overcooking my smaller roast. (When I bake in the evening, if I shut the door immediately once done, the oven is usually still warm in the morning.) Kristen made a good suggestion, which I recommend be included in the instructions, and that is to cut the roast into two pieces. It came up here, in this Hotline question: Initially, it occI think the lesson here is that unless you have an internal probe that can remain in the oven with the door shut, alerting you when the roast reaches the desired temperature, you're better off not using this recipe for larger roasts. But, for the reaso as Kristen suggested in this response on the Hotline, cut the roast in two and http://www.food52.com/hotline... I followed all of the Hotline questions, and all of the online discussion carefully, including yesterday, as people reported back, in light of the somewhat risky nature of this endeavor. Oh, one other point: some people are lucky enough to have internal probes hooked into the inside of their ovens, which can be set so that you are notified when the cooked item has reached that temperature, without requiring you to open the oven door. I'm fortunate enough to have one. There may be a workaround such as putting a stand-alone probe in the roast and positioning the indicator so it can be read through the oven door (assuming you have a glass pane). The probe still won't help with the overcooking of the outside, though. Thank you so much for letting us know about this. I'm sure I'm not alone in my gratitude that you took the time to share this useful information. ;o)

Miglore

almost 3 years ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Glasshalfmd, I'm so sorry to hear this. We've always had success with this recipe, but you're right -- even if it works for most ovens, it's just too much pressure to have an expensive cut of meat that you can't check on. AntoniaJames' suggestion is great -- others may want to use an oven-safe thermometer that you can read without opening the door. Probe thermometers like this one can snake through the oven door and are an inexpensive way to save such a wonderful piece of meat: http://www.amazon.com/Original... I hope you can at least use the leftovers in cold roast beef sandwiches, or hashes, tacos, and soups.

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almost 3 years ago glasshalfmd

Kristen- So nice of you to respond. I own that snaking thermometer (which I never use because it seems to clunky)--and this would have been the right time to use it. Happily, this meat was so flavorful and tender that, amazing to say, it was rather good even well done. Do you know what really made it? The bone marrow gravy from Heston Blumenthal's new book. One thing it did not occur to me to consider--and I'd love your feedback here--is whether dry-ageing may be a factor. Of course the water content is reduced. Any idea if this played a part in the debacle?

Miglore

almost 3 years ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Interesting thought -- it could very well be a factor, because of the moisture difference you point out. But since a few others have had the same issue, it's probably more complex than just that. It seems modern ovens have become more efficient than in Seranne's day -- I'll add a note to the recipe to watch the temperature to be safe. Glad yours was still edible!

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almost 3 years ago galsmu

Great recipe! I cooked a 4-rib 12 pound roast and it was a perfect medium rare. Everyone loved it so I know we will use this technique again.

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almost 3 years ago calyn

I used this recipe with a boneless rib (6 minutes per pound, on a rack as Kristen suggested)-- perfect! At one point it occurred to me that I was gambling with an $80 hunk of meat and what would certainly be sure to be a memorable Christmas day food fiasco if it didn't work. But, I obviously am a food 52 believer because in went the meat and out it came, beautiful, perfect, applause worthy. Food52-you guys are fabulous!

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almost 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Our favorite beef recipe (of any kind) ever. Seriously. Ours was 3.8 pounds -- 2 ribs -- roasted for 30 minutes at 475 in my convection oven, then left for exactly 2 hours. Took it out, but did not carve for almost an hour, as I made Yorkshire pudding, needed the oven for some other sides, etc. Made a reduction using pan drippings, minus most of the fat + 3/4 cup Burgundy, reduced by about half. Had twice as much beef as the four of us needed. Made potato rolls which, with some mushrooms sauteed with shallot and fresh herbs (made this afternoon but not served) + the leftover wine reduction and leftover beef, will make quite a satisfying lunch tomorrow. I started all dinner preparations when we returned at 2:30 from hiking/running up Mt. Tam on a spectacular winter day. (Rolls were rising in fridge while we were gone. I made them as soon as we came in, while letting the roast come to room temperature.) ;o)

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almost 3 years ago pippin

Made this for Christmas dinner this evening and it was flawless. Wish all recipes were this easy and foolproof! Mine was a 3-rib, 6.87 pound roast (thus smaller than the weight the chart lists for a 3-rib roast)---did 40 mins. at 500 and then left in the oven for another 2 hours, 10 minutes. Took it out, carved it almost immediately, as it had "rested" already in the cooling oven, and the whole thing was a perfect medium-rare. Thanks for resurrecting this timeless classic---I'll use it again and again! My only "beef"? --- the high heat and resulting fat-searing caused a LOT of smoking from my oven during the initial 40-minute cooking time. I recommend turning on your fans and opening a window or two before trying this recipe!

Becky

almost 3 years ago rpenovich

I'm going to try this with eye of round so we'll see how it goes!

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almost 3 years ago Rhonda35

So easy and perfectly cooked! I liked that the roast was mostly medium rare, with medium ends for those who like their meat a bit more cooked through. We had this for our family Christmas gathering, along with horseradish-herb sauce, oven-roasted potatoes, balsamic-glazed cipollini onions, Brussels sprouts sauteed with bacon and chestnuts and mixed greens with Roquefort vinaigrette. Not one complaint to be had! Thanks for sharing!

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almost 3 years ago JoyP

Has anyone tried this on a gas grill? I usually do my turkey this way and it turns out beautifulyy!

Sunflourflower-2c

almost 3 years ago sunflourbaking

I have been making standing rib roast every Christmas eve for 20 years to great success. Decided to try this recipe last night as I found it intriguing. I followed the method to a tee, not opening the oven after turning it off to ensure there was no significant heat loss. Unfortunately, the meat was seriously overcooked! Ovens are significantly different in heat retention abilities, so I would caution those attempting this recipe to try and determine their oven's capability beforehand.

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almost 3 years ago Coffeecat

Has anyone done a larger roast using this method? I have a full rib roast - 7 ribs and coming in around 20 pounds. I'm leery of cooking it for 100 minutes at 500 - any thoughts on compensating for the larger roast?

Miglore

almost 3 years ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Coffeecat, see our answer on this thread -- we think cutting the roast in half and roasting side-by-side is the way to go: http://www.food52.com/hotline...

Me

almost 3 years ago TheWimpyVegetarian

We've got kids and grand kids coming to visit next week and this is on the menu for their visit. It looks perfect for a dinner that will be made in the midst of chaos! Thanks, and a very happy holidays to you and everyone at Food52!!!!!

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almost 3 years ago ljacsf

How long would I cook this for a 7 rib roast?

Miglore

almost 3 years ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

ljacsf see our answer above -- hope you enjoy the roast!

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almost 3 years ago ljacsf

How long would I cook this for a 7 rib roast?

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about 3 years ago ejm

I am a little confused by the chart with the roasting times. It says weight without the short ribs but it is not clear to me if that is the weight with the "long" ribs shown in the photo, and if so, are we to remove the "short" ones. I don't see anything that looks like the short ribs I braise so happily? Thanks in advance for your help interpreting.

Miglore

about 3 years ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

Sorry for the confusion! The chart is referring to the weight of a standing rib roast, including 2-4 attached "primal" ribs (the ones you see in the photo). The "Without Short Ribs" part means that the short ribs of the rack shouldn't be included as well, since the cooking method wouldn't work as well for those. Here's more explanation of the rib situation from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org... In practice, I'm not sure how often short ribs are sold along with the primal ribs -- maybe it was more common in Seranne's day.

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about 3 years ago fearoffrying

This is the way I've always made prime rib.I do, however, slather it with chili sauce, A-1 and Worcestershire before the 500 degree singe in the oven. I take it out 2 hours later, and it's a perfect medium rare. Be sure to let it sit for about half an hour before cutting, though, to let the juices redistribute throughout the meat.

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almost 3 years ago chubert

I like your suggestion of the chili/A-1/Worcestershire sauce as the coating. Does the top come out as "crispy" as having a flour coating?

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about 3 years ago Robin O'D

I have made this twice since I read the recipe in Amanda's NY Times book. It's great. Great crust.

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almost 3 years ago Rhonda35

This is what we are having for Christmas dinner! Knowing you made it twice already - and it turned out great both times - gives me a sense of calm. Merry, merry!

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about 3 years ago ibbeachnana

Well my menu just changed again. Thanks for the article. I was able to copy and paste the chart to my recipe program and Evernote, but not here so here is the chart for anyone that is having trouble finding it:


Number of Ribs Weight Without Short Ribs Roasting Time at 500°
2 4 ½ lbs - 5 lbs 25-30 minutes
3 8-9 lbs 40-45 minutes
4 11-12 lbs 55-60 minutes

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about 3 years ago ibbeachnana

Number of Ribs Weight Without Short Ribs Roasting Time at 500°
2 4 ½ lbs 25-30 minutes
3 8-9 lbs 40-45 minutes
4 11-12 lbs 55-60 minutes

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about 3 years ago ibbeachnana

Clearly that didn't show up as written on my word document: Roasting temperature is 500°. Weight - 2 ribs = 4-1/2 lbs-25-30 minutes, 3 ribs = 8-9 lbs-40-45 minutes, 4 ribs = 11-12 lbs-55-60 minutes.

May someone can come along and clean up my mess.

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about 3 years ago dymnyno

Served with a horseradish sauce, potatoes Anna and a great spinach side, this is Freddy's favorite food! Truly genius.

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about 3 years ago Susige

So, would a prime rib roast without the ribs roast for the same time? I cannot buy a roast with ribs in my community without mail order or traveling two-three hours.... Would I adjust the initial roasting time down by five to ten minutes to adjust it not having ribs? Thanks.

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about 3 years ago tomatobiscuit

i have the same question. Please post answer if you receive one.

Miglore

almost 3 years ago Kristen Miglore

Kristen is the Executive Editor of Food52

This method was designed by Seranne to work for a bone-in roast, and since we haven't tested a boneless version, we'd hate to lead you astray. This is our advice: you'll want to use a roasting rack (the bones act as the rack), and keep the fatty side up as it roasts to baste the meat. Bones conduct heat into the center of a roast, so a boneless roast will actually take longer to cook. You might try 6 minutes per pound at 500 degrees instead of 5 minutes. And if you're nervous, you could try checking the internal temperature midway through the 2-hour wait (opening and closing the oven quickly to keep the heat in!).

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about 3 years ago sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Its the second on the slide show, I want to make it also!

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about 3 years ago inpatskitchen

I cook a standing rib roast every month or so and would love the roasting time chart for this one also.. I'm always looking for new ways to roast and this one looks pretty darn good!!

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about 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Where is the roasting time chart? Looks very tasty. I might just be changing my Christmas day menu. ;o)

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about 3 years ago dymnyno

Roasting. Chart is pic #2.