Acorn Squash Stuffed With Quinoa, Golden Raisins, Walnuts & Sage

By • January 3, 2012 • 6 Comments

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Author Notes: Adapted from recipe for Sweet Dumpling Squash Filled with Wild Rice, Golden Raisins, and Pine Nuts from Fields of Greens, by Annie Somerville. I substituted quinoa for the wild rice, celery for fennel, walnuts for pine nuts (and increased the quantity), added fresh sage, and increased quantity of red onion.Galettista

Serves 6

  • 3 Acorn Squash
  • 3 tablespoons Olive Oil
  • 3 cups Cooked Quinoa
  • 2/3 cup Golden Raisins
  • 1/3 cup Dried Currants
  • 1 1/2 cups Diced Red Onion
  • 2 Garlic Cloves, minced
  • 1 cup Celery, chopped
  • 1/4 cup White Wine
  • 2/3 cup Walnuts, toasted and coarsely chopped
  • 1 tablespoon Fresh Sage, minced
  • 1 teaspoon Grated Orange Zest
  1. Preheat oven to 375. Cut squash in half and scoop out seeds. Brush lightly with olive oil and place squash halves flesh side down in baking dish. Bake for 20 minutes. Remove the squash from the oven and turn it cavity side up. While the sqush is baking, prepare the filling.
  2. In a small bowl, combine the golden raisins and currants; cover them with 1/2 cup of hot water and set aside. Heat 2 Tbsp. olive oil in a saute pan, add the onions and 1/2 tsp salt. Saute over medium heat until the onions are soft, for about 5 minutes, then add garlic and celery and saute for 1 minute. Add wine and simmer until the pan is nearly dry.
  3. Combine cooked quinoa, sauteed onions and celery, drained fruit, walnuts, sage, and orange zest and season with salt and pepeer to taste. Divide the filling among the squash halves. Cover and bake for 30-40 minutes.
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2 months ago Laney Patrick

do you bake the filled squash at the same temp (375) for 30-40 min?

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about 1 year ago bgavin

Are you a proponent of cutting the acorn squash along its equator or its prime meridian? (Assuming the stem is the North Pole, of course!)

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about 1 year ago Galettista

Definitely the prime meridian. You can slice a bit off the underside to make a flat bottom and keep them from tipping.

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almost 2 years ago Carolyn Lewis

Thanks for the additions.

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almost 2 years ago Carolyn Lewis

Recipe calls for onions and currants in instructions, but not listed in ingredients.

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almost 2 years ago Galettista

Sorry. They are listed in ingredients now.