Nic's Caesar Salad Dressing

By • March 1, 2012 • 4 Comments



Author Notes: Our teenage sons have been helping out in the kitchen more and more. Our oldest, Nic loves Caesar salad and has taken on the task of making the dressing whenever we have a salad with dinner. We notice the guys are more likely to eat dishes that they have made!WeLikeToCook

Serves 4-6

  • 1 large egg, blanced
  • 4-5 anchovy filets
  • 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin oilve oil
  • 2-3 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1-3 dash Tabasco sauce (to taste)
  1. Place egg, Worcestershire sauce, anchovies, lemon juice, garlic, salt, pepper, mustard, and Tabasco sauce in a food processor and pulse. Slowly add in olive oil.
  2. The dressing will start to emulsify. Adjust flavor to individual preference. You can add a little more lemon juice (or red wine vinegar) to thin.
  3. Add dressing to romaine lettuce that has been shredded into bite-sized pieces and coat well. This is best done by hand. Add some grated cheese and croutons while mixing. Top with more grated cheese, croutons (and any remaining anchovy filets) before serving.
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about 2 years ago Radster

This is my go-to caesar dressing except I use only the egg white and throw in a few crushed capers at the end. Powerful and delicious.

Jan2013cropped

over 2 years ago WeLikeToCook

I blanch a few eggs at a time to pasteurize them to reduce the risk of salmonella. To pasteurize large eggs, place them (whole-still in the shell) in a saucepan filled with water and fitted with a digital thermometer. Turn on the heat and bring the water up to 140F.
Keep the water temperature at 140F for 3 minutes (and no more than 142F), reducing the heat on the burner if necessary. Remove eggs from hot water and rinse thoroughly with cold water to stop the cooking process. If we are not using all of the eggs at once, I dry them off and mark the shell with a Sharpie marker and place back in the fridge. These pasteurized eggs will keep for up to a week and can be used just as any raw egg would be used. Or you can simply buy pasteurized eggs at the supermarket. They are also great for baking with kids that just can't resist eating the cookie dough. Hope this answers your question!

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over 2 years ago joannbuc

question: what is Nic doing with egg? blanced? do you boil it in its shell? poach it for a bit, shell-less?

Jan2013cropped

over 2 years ago WeLikeToCook

I blanch a few eggs at a time to pasteurize them to reduce the risk of salmonella. To pasteurize large eggs, place them (whole-still in the shell) in a saucepan filled with water and fitted with a digital thermometer. Turn on the heat and bring the water up to 140F.
Keep the water temperature at 140F for 3 minutes (and no more than 142F), reducing the heat on the burner if necessary. Remove eggs from hot water and rinse thoroughly with cold water to stop the cooking process. If we are not using all of the eggs at once, I dry them off and mark the shell with a Sharpie marker and place back in the fridge. These pasteurized eggs will keep for up to a week and can be used just as any raw egg would be used. Or you can simply buy pasteurized eggs at the supermarket. They are also great for baking with kids that just can't resist eating the cookie dough. Hope this answers your question!