Crock-Pot Chicken Stock

By • March 5, 2010 • 0 Comments

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Author Notes: My husband and I lived in Paris for a year. We have many wonderful memories of our time there, though very few of those happy memories stem from our tiny kitchen/shower room! The kitchen was very small, even by Parisian standards: 5 feet by 3 feet with a sloped wall. The room also housed our shower... odd, I know. Aside from a sink, microwave, and dorm-room sized refrigerator, there was only two electric burners whose setting was either burning hot or off. Luckily for me, I found a used crock-pot, which greatly enhanced my cooking options. Every Friday night, my husband and I would buy a 5 euros poulet roti from our local butcher. This stock recipe developed from our Friday night dinners. Enjoy and bon appetit!CarlaCooks

Serves 3 liters/12 cups

  • 1 cooked chicken carcass
  • 2 carrots, washed and trimmed
  • 3 celery stalks (including leaves), washed
  • 1 whole onion, washed
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 4-6 peppercorns
  • 1 handful parsley (optional)
  • water
  1. Chop the carrots into 2 inch pieces. Chop the celery stalks in half length-wise. Chop the onion into 4 pieces; you can include the outer brown skin, which helps to color the stock. Add all of the vegetables, chicken carcass, bay leaf, peppercorns, and parsley if using (I say optional because I don't always have parsley available so I've made the stock with and without it) into a large crock-pot. Fill with water to 1 inch from the top of the pot (keep in mind that not much liquid evaporates from a crock-pot). The amount of water you use will depend on the size of your crock-pot. Cover and cook on low setting for 4-8 hours, or overnight.
  2. After 4-8 hours, turn the crock-pot off and place lid off-center so the stock can cool. When the pot is warm enough to handle, discard vegetables and carcass. Strain the stock using a fine-sieved strainer. Use for a recipe like chicken soup or freeze for later use.
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