Matilda, Maple, and Garlic Pork Shoulder with Crispy Skin

By • April 1, 2010 • 196 Comments

3,957 Save

If you like it, save it!

Save and organize all of the stuff you love in one place.

Got it!

If you like something…

Click the heart, it's called favoriting. Favorite the stuff you like.

Got it!


Author Notes: My grandmother (yes, I'm mentioning my grandmother again) used to cook her ever-present, giant ham by sticking it in the oven and pouring ginger ale over it every once in a while, as if it had won the Super Bowl. I decided to use a bottle of Matilda beer, a lovely fruity malty ale made here in Chicago, by Goose Island, with maple syrup for some extra sweetness. You'll probably have to special order the rind-on cut; I had a hard time getting one in Chicago, a.k.a Meatland. Strange. The ponderously long cooking time was inspired by The River Cottage Meat Book, a book that I find charmingly revolting.ENunn

Food52 Review: WHO: ENunn is a writer in Chicago.
WHAT: A tender pork shoulder that is the definition of "slow and low" -- it cooks for 18 hours!
HOW: After mixing up the fennel and garlic marinade, the roast goes in the oven and requires little work save some intermittent basting.
WHY WE LOVE IT: Whether you love crispy skin or falling-apart meat, this showstopper has something for everybody.
The Editors

Serves 4 to 6 to 8

  • 6 to 8 pounds bone-in, skin on pork shoulder
  • 3 tablespoons fennel seeds, toasted, crushed
  • 14 pieces garlic cloves, crushed
  • 3 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 1 teaspoon black pepper
  • 3/4 cup grade b maple syrup
  • 1 big bottle of Matilda, or another malty fruity ale
  • 2 teaspoons malt vinegar
  1. After allowing the meat to come to room temperature, use a sharp knife to score the skin, making 1/2 inch stripes over entire surface. Preheat oven to 450. Toast fennel seeds in a skillet over medium heat, until fragrant (3 minutes); crush using mortar and pestle, set aside. Place garlic and salt in empty mortar mortar and grind together to make a paste. Slowly add olive oil, then sprinkle in cayenne, black pepper, fennel.
  2. Rub about 1/3 of the paste over the skinless side of the meat, then place skin side down on a roasting pan in lower third of oven. Cook for 30 minutes. Meanwhile stir the syrup and vinegar into the remaining paste.
  3. Turn the oven down to 225. Carefully flip the shoulder (use a clean towel), then use a rubber spatula to spread the remaining paste over the shoulder, pushing it into the scored skin.
  4. Return to oven and cook for 18 hours or longer (you can put it in the oven at bedtime and leave it in until you serve it as an early supper the next day, which is what I did; I just turned it all the way down to 150 for a couple of hours late in the afternoon), pouring 1/3 of the bottle of beer over it at several intervals, and basting with the drippings 2-3 times. Seriously. Before serving, turn up the heat to 450 for ten minutes if the skin is not crispy enough. Put it on a platter, and let people pull off pieces, like wild animals. They will fight over the skin.
  5. Serve with my Fresh Fennel and Red Pepper Chow-Chow (under "condiments"), and mashed sweet potatoes with apples. Leftover pork, Chow-Chow, and spicy mayo sandwich on ciabatta: very good idea.
Jump to Comments (196)

Comments (196) Questions (8)

Default-small
Default-small
Default-small

about 1 month ago chicagoem

I'm making this recipe with a 4lb cut. How should I adjust the cooking time? I'm 10 hours in and there is a LOT of liquid in the pan is that right? I've only added about 1/3 of the beer called for.

Default-small

about 1 month ago Emma Brett

This was delicious, friends and family said it was the best pork they had ever tasted! I served it with braised red cabbage and Nigella Lawson's creamy potato gratin on the first day and we had leftovers with a winter coleslaw the following days. I was a bit nervous about cooking it for so long uncovered but followed the recipe exactly and it was perfect. I did have to remove some of the crust as it was burnt but the meat underneath was very tasty. I will make again but the really long cooking time adds to my electric bills so I won't be making it every week!

Default-small

about 1 month ago Carol

I made this and loved it. My mom used to make beef roast with this method and a much lower temperature. It worked wonderfully and clearly it works for pork roasts too. And nice picture! That is what really got my attention to investigate this recipe. Now to try it at a slightly lower temperature for a smaller pork loin. Thank you for this addition to my recipe list.

Default-small

about 1 month ago Kristen D.

This is a late post, but I made this for an Easter brunch. It came out FA_NOM_IN-NAL. Like AMAZINGLY GOOD. And, I had plenty leftover for the freezer. It froze great, and frankly didn't even last very long in there! Two warnings though: My oven had a 12 hour automatic shutoff, which happened to be at 2AM. Luckily, I woke up at 2:30 and decided to check on it, and saw it was off! Thank goodness, or I'd have had a ruined roast by morning! Second thing, is that my house SMELLED....delicious....at first....but let me tell you, smell anything for 18 hours and it's going to start to stink. Luckily the other things I started to cook for the brunch the morning of masked some of it before the guests arrived. 18 hours is a long time, but I will do it again for another special occasion I think. Also, agreed with those below, I went to a Mexican meat market to find my cut of meat. None of the specialty grocery stores or butchers had it.

Default-small

about 1 month ago Bryan Narendorf

We found this recipe to be underwhelming.

Food52_photo

about 1 month ago ENunn

We only crafted this underwhelming dish to mask the aroma
of poems cooling on the window ledge. Thank you for not being "shy" about criticizing!

Default-small

2 months ago Urbain Dubois

may work if you remove the bone and cut into smaller portions...this is just an off the cuff response. I am not sure this help you. Good Luck! I cooked beef short ribs last night and they were tender in around 3hours so just going on that.

Stringio

2 months ago Lesley Turner

This may sound crazy, but is there a way to follow these steps, adjust the time a modification of this in say 2-3 hours? Like just cook it like a regular ham? it looks really good, but I have very limited time, and am trying to pull this together in a rush

Default-small

6 months ago David Culp

Add the maple late in the process to avoid stinky drip-off burning action during the many hours of cooking.

Default-small

7 months ago Andy

OMG My son just told me about this site. I have already emailed a recipe to my wife. This pork shoulder is driving me insane. I have made pork shoulder roast on my grill and it never looked this amazing! Cant wait to give it a whirl. 18 hours WOW!

Default-small

8 months ago jsandy

I have a 4.5 pound boneless butt. Love the recipe - what modifications should I make to time/temp? Any suggestions?

Stringio

8 months ago Elizabeth Brailey Sobliros

Do you cover this ..?

Default-small

8 months ago [email protected]

When I saw this I had to try it. Low & slow is the normal way to do pork shoulder or butt when doing on a smoker but usually at 250 to 275 deg. Not sure this is proper but here is a link to the one I did with a lot of photos.
http://pelletsmokercooking...
Thanks Ed for the recipe it was worth doing. Don

Default-small

8 months ago Cydneyroach

After searching for the bone-in shoulder with the skin still on, the butcher at Whole Foods told me to go to the Hispanic grocery store (Fiesta here in Dallas). And I found exactly what I was looking for!

Default-small

8 months ago Adonia Larson

should I put a lid on it?

Default-small

9 months ago mara lepri

why is the book so charmingly revolting?

Default-small

9 months ago jamie munal

4 in Texas

Default-small

9 months ago StevenHB

Seems like this ought to serve a lot more than 4-8.

Default-small

9 months ago cookinalong

Malinda, there are some great pressure cooker recipes for this, and some are on the web. Try the website Dad Cooks Dinner or MissVicky's site. The first has some good recipes, the second lots of good advice about pressure cooking. And if you can get a copy of Lorna Sass's Cooking Under Pressure, you're on your way. Good luck. I love my pressure cooker!

Default-small

9 months ago StevenHB

How would a pressure cooker get the skin crisp? The shatteringly crisp skin is a key feature of pernil, of which this seems to be a variant.

Default-small

9 months ago cookinalong

It wouldn't. I think Malinda was just wondering if this cut could be prepared in a pressure cooker. It can, but obviously, since it's a radically different cooking method, the results are not going to be the same. It was off topic. Sorry if I colored outside the lines!

Copper-board-jpeg-for-web

8 months ago rob weaver

the long, low temp cooking melts away the connective tissues that makes the very tough piece of meat very tender. a pressure cooker will cook the meat but you'll still have a tough one to deal with.

Default-small

10 months ago Malinda Barrett

I know that this a low and slow recipe, but I just bought my first pressure cooker, and wonder if I could do this in the exact opposite way? Have saved some recipes for the pressure cooker already, but would really like to make this...

Default-small

10 months ago Sarah Hanson

I am making this for my husband's birthday, and there are just the two of us, so I got. 3-lb roast. Should I shorten the cooking time or still let it go the full 18 hours?

Me_and_fb_bw

10 months ago Angel

I would probably shorten it, but I unfortunately do not know what to shorten it to. you'll have to keep an eye on it.

Default-small

9 months ago cookinalong

I'm with Angel. You definitely have to shorten the time. I would think the safest thing would be to judge by internal temp. However, I am surprised you managed to find a bone-in roast that was only 3lbs. Sometimes the bone itself is about 2 lbs! I would not try this recipe with a boneless pork roast, so double check what kind of roast you have.

Default-small

5 months ago rhonda

why would a boneless not be good with this recipe? I could only find boneless...so I bought it..now have to cook it. It is also double the size...so suggestions?

Default-small

10 months ago jamie munal

Sad, I wouldn't have believed it until you said it. My experience was with brown outs. It's back to wood burning stoves.

Default-small

10 months ago cookinalong

Jamie, don't start chopping wood just yet! I think the problem I experienced is limited to the older gas stoves without electronic ignition. Other people who have used newer gas ovens seem to have had good results. The person who posted the recipe developed it using a gas oven. Bottom line, I suggest if you have doubts that you give yours a trial run as I did with mine. If the fire stays lit, you're OK.

Default-small

10 months ago jamie munal

I'm actually retrying this recipe this weekend... It will not defeat me.. LOL... I have a generator now.

Default-small

10 months ago cookinalong

Just updating on my experience with my ancient gas oven. As I feared, the pilot light does not stay reliably lit at temps lower than 275-300. I did a trial run with an empty oven on Friday PM and after about 1 hour at 225, I checked on it and the flame had gone out, with the gas still escaping. Not good. I shut it off, opened the windows for a few hours and tried again at 250. Same result. I didn't want to risk trying again since it was getting near bedtime. I'm disappointed I won't be able to try this recipe, because it looks wonderful, bit hope this info is helpful as a cautionary tale for others with ancient gas ovens! On the bright side, I'm hoping to use this info to convince my landlord to upgrade the kitchen to the 20th Century. I fear asking him to come all the way to the 21st might be stretching it!

Default-small

10 months ago Cade

Oh, I have to weigh in on this recipe. I was verrrrryyyy skeptical. But what the heck, it was Super Bowl Sunday, my local Mexican grocery store had an 8 pound bone-in pork shoulder with thick skin for 15 bucks, and I thought, I'll try it. I went to Trader Joe's and got a local brew there. I even used Grade A syrup and cider vinegar instead of malt vinegar. I started it at 9:30pm on Saturday night. The one thing I wish I would have done is for the initial 450 cook for 30 minutes, it would have helped to put foil down. The fat side of the roast stuck to the pan like super glue! But I got it off, turned it over and turned the oven to 200. Woke up the next morning, shut oven off, turned it back on right away at 200 (in case it had an auto shut off). At 2:30pm on Sunday, turned it to 170, the lowest. At 4:30pm, I cranked it up to 450. Ate at 5:15. Freaking amazing recipe. Delicious. DELICIOUS. Thank you!!!!!

Default-small

10 months ago maya

The favors were amazing but unfortunately 18 hours was too long. 13-14 would have been enough. Still tasted amazing and will just have to make it again :)

Default-small

10 months ago jamie munal

I trust gas over electricity.. When doing mine we had a brown out during the night.. I caught it but if I hadn't this meal would have not even started

Default-small

10 months ago cookinalong

The thing I was worried about with the gas is the possibility of the flame going out and the gas continuing to flow, especially with the very low temp called for. I agree electric is vulnerable to power outages, but a gas oven maintains temp by cycling on and off as needed & I guess what worries me is that it the gas might go on without the flame. I've got a really old oven, not one of the newer electronic ignition type. This evening I'm planning to test-drive the low heat scenario while we're all awake, just to make sure it goes off without a hitch. Thanks to all for your advice.

Food52_photo

10 months ago ENunn

Good luck, cookinalong. I'm sure it will be fine. I'm sorry not everyone was taking your questions seriously. I think @boomdog02 is here for reasons that don't have much to do with cooking! Who knows? I hope it works out. If not, feel free to send me a direct message with questions.

Default-small

10 months ago cookinalong

Thanks! I'm confident that a girl from South Carolina knows whereof she speaks on the subject of pork! I'll report back on the oven experiment.

Default-small

10 months ago cookinalong

Thanks, Angel. Think I'll try it this weekend. And Boomdog, I can't tell if you're being sarcastic, or genuinely trying to be helpful, but since I live in a city apartment, your suggestion isn't viable. Also, it's about 5 degrees out there!

Food52_photo

10 months ago ENunn

Hi, I created the recipe in a high-rise apartment in Chicago with a gas stove. You will be fine.

Default-small

10 months ago cookinalong

I'd love to try this but I'm worried about leaving a gas oven on overnight, and I can't see any other way to prepare it and have dinner at any reasonable hour. Has anyone else used a gas oven? Am I being overly cautious? Or just paranoid?

Cbac9720-fcb6-11e3-9b4b-8d0fb8177fe2_dogeating

10 months ago Boomdog02

uh, all the above. You could dig a pit in the yard, build a big fir, lay in some river rocks, when the fire has died, put the meat in on a tray, covered with banana leaves, then cover with a tarp and soil. leave overnight and dig up the next day!

Me_and_fb_bw

10 months ago Angel

I too was concerned when I made it. I've used a gas oven every time I made it. I did shorten the cooking time once by putting it in my Pampered Chef stone roaster, and cooking at a higher heat. I have to say, although the taste was almost there, the texture was not and the juices did not render.

the amazing smell of this cooking will most likely wake you up several times in the night, allowing you to check it

Default-small

11 months ago Thembi

Mine turned out great! I did a bone in skin off but with a nice layer of fat wish I could show you the pics they were mouthwatering. And it tasted better. Thank you for the great recipe

Default-small

11 months ago denise&food

Made this overnight. It was fantastic! Crisped the skin at the end and what a treat. Can't wait to see what the leftover can do..tacos, BBQ pork sandwiches. Endless possibilities. Thank you for a great holiday gift!

Stringio

11 months ago maggie.vianamourino

It was amazing. Cooked it for 18 hours. Was very moist and easy to take apart with the fork. Loved the sweet flavor from the maple syrup. I made it with deboned pork shoulders. I will make this every holiday. There were no left overs.

Default-small

11 months ago tamararenee

this recipe was fabulous. my family thanks you immensely!

Default-small

11 months ago Thembi

Mine has been in the oven for 12 hours so far....I may have to increase the heat a bit to get it done quicker...can't wait to try it

Default-small

11 months ago denise&food

Making this now...when do I start to put the beer over the roast? Do I put 1/3 of the beer at the beginning or wait until 12 hours later and then space it out? Thanks....

Stringio

11 months ago maggie.vianamourino

Is it spicy?

Default-small

11 months ago jamie munal

to Enunn- LOL now you tell me... this wasn't a criticism more for information as to what not to do... the ultimate error was mine in the attempt not the recipe...

Food52_photo

11 months ago ENunn

Merry Christmas!

Default-small

11 months ago Poodleranch

How long does it take to get to room temperature? I go somewhere else for Christmas eve and have to start this when I get back, but I'd like to eat mid afternoon on the 25th. Maybe I can start it before? Or leave it out for 5 hours to come to room temp, but that seems like a long time to leave raw meat sitting out.

Stringio

11 months ago Denise Stevenson

Making this now - but my skin was stuck to the bottom of the pan and half of it was ripped off. Burnt my finger and bent a big spoon trying to get it off. What did I do wrong? Directions said rub marinade on skinless side so I left skin side dry. Maybe it was still not truly room temperature?

Me_and_fb_bw

11 months ago Angel

If you're not done cooking it--It will eventually come off with all of the other "juices" that accumulate and your basting. Don't sweat it.

I'm making it right now too! :)

Stringio

11 months ago Denise Stevenson

But I had to flip it over to baste the skin side. I'm so excited! This is my first pork shoulder. Have wanted to try to cook one for ages and this recipe sounded so amazing that I had to try it.

Default-small

11 months ago Poodleranch

How'd it turn out?

Stringio

11 months ago Denise Stevenson

It was delicious. Next time, I'll make sure to put some oil on the skin side for the first stage in the oven so that it doesn't stick. Best part was how easy it was to just leave it in the oven for hours and hours !!

Default-small

11 months ago Poodleranch

I just flipped mine over, and even with oil, a few squares of skin stuck. I can't wait until it's done tomorrow.

Default-small

11 months ago jamie munal

since I don't like beer I used apple cider... didn't work very well and no one ended up eating it....

Food52_photo

11 months ago ENunn

Hmmmm. This is a good example of a time when it might have been wise to pass on the recipe altogether rather than waste the ingredients. Here is a terrific recipe that might suit you better, from another Food52 cook: http://food52.com/recipes...

Default-small

11 months ago JohnSkye

the recipe doesn't mention whether to cover it ... "angel" says she didn't and "it didn't seem to matter" ... so, ENnun, does it matter??? ... also so, why "definitely, not" to a slow cooker???

Food52_photo

11 months ago ENunn

John, you are cooking this at extremely low heat, so try not to worry about covering it; you can't do much damage and you want that skin to turn out like a cookie, anyway, for diners to break off and eat with their pig. If you're worried about burning something, just check in on it now and then. But that's not going to happen; you can always tent it with a piece of tinfoil later on if you think it's getting scorched, but it's not getting scorched at 225 degrees. Regarding your inquiry about a slow cooker, my first answer is: because I said so. Second answer: why would you EVER?

Terry_close

11 months ago TerryKes

You don't use a sow cooker because you won't get the same depth of flavor result and you'd never get the caramalizing and crust in a crock pot. The true magic doesn't happen until the last quarter of the cooking. And magic, it is. Just try it as written and trust the experience of all these cooks.

Terry_close

11 months ago TerryKes

Ha! Slow cooker.

Food52_photo

11 months ago ENunn

Just to be clear, and all kidding aside, of course you can execute a recipe however you like; I tend to try a recipe exactly as it's written the first time out. Then, if I want to mess around with it, I won't wonder what I was missing. And it's nice to start from a place where you know the recipe has been tested several times and it works. With this one, TerryKes is right about the caramelizing etc. A crockpot is a great thing, just not for this particular recipe.

Default-small

about 1 year ago Nicholas Farina

Bottom line....this was one of the best pork shoulder dishes I have ever made! Ended up booking it for 24 hours due to timing of the dinner, but it was perfect! Pulled the bone right out, no knife needed, only tongs. Any malted beer works great, went with a raspberry from Belgium.

Default-small

about 1 year ago jamie munal

I don't like beer period... I know I'm weird... but that being said what alternatives to beer can be used?

Cbac9720-fcb6-11e3-9b4b-8d0fb8177fe2_dogeating

about 1 year ago Boomdog02

I'm a bit concerned about the length of time to cook..anyone have thoughts on this?

Me_and_fb_bw

about 1 year ago Angel

I've made it twice. No concerns at all. Low and Slow. Turns out amazing

Cbac9720-fcb6-11e3-9b4b-8d0fb8177fe2_dogeating

about 1 year ago Boomdog02

I'm gonna' give it a try..hope the dog can resist all night!

Me_and_fb_bw

about 1 year ago Angel

Note: the second time I used Blue Moon Harvest beer b/c the Matilda was out of stock at the liquor store. I tasted no difference at all. And, it was considerably less expensive.

Leftovers make amazing pork tacos :)

Terry_close

about 1 year ago TerryKes

I've made this twice and the instructions are spot on. We have a traditional pre-Thanksgiving Thanksgiving dinner for family that travel elsewhere for the actual holiday. This is my main protein as we'll have turkey soon following and it's EASY and DELICIOUS! Good luck!

Stringio

about 1 year ago Katie Colomb

Anyone who has made this--are you sure you don't cover it when cooking in the over? I always cover things when I roast them

Me_and_fb_bw

about 1 year ago Angel

I did not, and it did not seem to matter. I did not find the pork with the skin on, but rather I selected one with a big fat cap. That seemed to help. You will get a little 'crusty' but because you're basting and cooking at a low heat, it doesn't seem to matter about being uncovered

Cbac9720-fcb6-11e3-9b4b-8d0fb8177fe2_dogeating

about 1 year ago Boomdog02

I've been making all sorts of slow cooked pork butt and pork shoulder for years. For my family of 4 I never cooked one more than 5-6 pounds(bone in). Usually 6-7 hours at 275 does the trick.

I'm going to be serving this recipe(among other dishes) this Thanksgiving, but I'm doing it "Cuban style" I plan to rub with the fennel garlic paste after brining with an orange garlic brine for 24 hours. I also plan on using Malta to baste it...it's a South American, malty beverage that is malty and slightly sweet and makes the meat caramelize beautifully. I'll be serving with a traditional mojo sauce, along with black beans and rice and fresh tortillas. I'm loving the idea of putting it in overnight and letting it go. However, I have always had mine with skin on, and it always is too tough to eat. I'm going to put it on a platter with two big roasting forks and letting the guests tear into it!.

Food52_photo

about 1 year ago ENunn

Well, that's actually a different recipe entirely. But it sounds very good.

Me_and_fb_bw

about 1 year ago Angel

I made this yesterday/today. I too couldn't find pork with the skin on it. I picked a pork shoulder with the fat covering and I'm happy I did.

this smelled SO good all night long. So much so that my dogs kept getting me up-- it was driving them crazy too!

Winner recipe. Can't wait to make again!

Default-small

about 1 year ago Cammarotagirl

Is there any kind of sauce you would recommend to accompany the roast.
I know it's good on it's own but would just like to have it as a side for
Oktoberfest party

Food52_photo

about 1 year ago ENunn

Yes, it is good on its own. But you know what? I'd mix together some maple syrup, a little malt vinegar and some Sirahcha or however you spell it—which I can't stop eating on everything lately. It also kills bugs. I'll leave the balance up to you. You could use cider vinegar. Am I too late?

Cbac9720-fcb6-11e3-9b4b-8d0fb8177fe2_dogeating

about 1 year ago Boomdog02

try a traditional Cuban Mojo: blend 1/2 cup OJ, 1/4 cup lime juice, 1/2 onion, 1TBS each oregano and cumin, 1 TBS olive oil, or check the web for a recipe: there are hundreds!

Default-small

over 1 year ago Debmal77

So any brand of darker maple syrup should do?

Default-small

over 1 year ago missadventurenaut

I'd say so. That's what helps it get that dark, crispy, sticky skin.

Default-small

over 1 year ago Debmal77

What is Grade B Maple Syrup and where can I buy it? I live in the Cleveland area

Default-small

over 1 year ago missadventurenaut

Grade A syrup is lighter and what you would typically use on pancakes. Grade B is darker and has a richer flavor. I'm pretty certain you can find both in any supermarket.

Me_and_fb_bw

about 1 year ago Angel

The only place I found Grade B (in the Chicago area) was at Trader Joes. I've made it with Grade A and Grade B. No noticible difference In MY Opinion.

Default-small

over 1 year ago Vivi B.

Some of us fellow Canadians have wondered about Matilda and suitable substitutes. Matilda is available lately at the Lcbo in Toronto. I bought quite a few bottles and his them thirsty beer drinkers.

Stringio

over 1 year ago Daniel Gottlieb

Can you make this with boneless/skinless pork shoulder?

462478_10201007846576410_474557637_o

over 1 year ago LeeLeeBee

I was able to find a skin-on, bone-in 9 lb shoulder, but after 18 hours of cooking at 225, the meat was really, really dry. Did I seriously overcook it? What went wrong?

Stringio

over 1 year ago Brian Buckley

There really is a need to cook it for 18 hours. I've never had to cook a 9-10lbs should for more than 14 hours. Use a thermometer that has a probe on a wire and leave it until your pork hits an internal temp of 200-205. Make sure the temperature probe is in the middle of the shoulder but not up against the bone. Otherwise you will get a falsely high reading. At 205 you should have beautifully juicy fall apart pork. I smoke mine on the grill instead of the oven.

Open-uri20130208-19668-1jj8iea-0

over 1 year ago Kevin Klepper

I am making this recipe tomorrow for a belated Father's Day on Saturday.

Default-small

over 1 year ago missadventurenaut

I just made this for father's day, and it was a hit! I used a bone-in, skin-on, Boston butt instead of the shoulder and it was superb.

Stringio

over 1 year ago Brian Buckley

Boston butt and shoulder are different names for the exact same cut of pork.

Default-small

over 1 year ago MaryDD

Just about to start on this for Father's Day dinner tomorrow night. Go figure they had a big pile of bone- in skin on pork shoulder at the market on sale! And so cheap!

Me

over 1 year ago TheWimpyVegetarian

This looks absolutely amazing!

Default-small

over 1 year ago Tamesha

Would someone be able to give me a good beef selection instead of using the pork shoulder?

Default-small

over 1 year ago lpcooks

Is there any way to do this ahead of time and then finish at night?

Stringio

over 1 year ago Brian Buckley

You can use what is called a "faux cambro." Get the meat to an internal temp of about 195-200 then wrap it in foil and place in a small cooler that is packed with towels all around the meat. This will keep the meat at temp for about a half day. Then you can pull it when you are ready to eat. You will lose the crispy bark by wrapping and letting it sit though.

Stringio

over 1 year ago Michelle Anilao

i really want to do this but I was wondering if you could do it in a slow cooker?

Food52_photo

over 1 year ago ENunn

No. Definitely not. You can leave your oven on overnight at such low heat without worrying about burning down your house.

Default-small

almost 2 years ago Vivi B.

I am so looking forward to making this on Friday/Saturday. I have a big shoulder out defrosting at this moment... I am planning to serve it with aoili, roasted peppers and arugula on hot chewy buns. And with some more traditional sides as well, given its bbq roots. Thanks for all the tips. Super helpful.

Stringio

12 months ago Aileen Morgan

Vivi B. I'm stealing your serving idea! Awesome!!

Default-small

almost 2 years ago Urbain Dubois

I made this last weekend and it was amazing! I liked the suggestion of the roasted fennel and apples. I was sort of at a loss about the sides but will know next time. I actually mixed up the first step and started it skin side up which really had little effect on the final dish. This really produces a confit of sorts. I suppose if it were shredded and stored in the fat that cooks out it could be served like rillettes on toast points. Thanks for this recipe; it's a winner!

Default-small

almost 2 years ago Gracediets

I made this and served it with rolls and au jus from the roasting pan. This was so good. Best pork of any kind I have ever eaten.

Default-small

almost 2 years ago iron_cho

My boyfriend and I made this for family over the holidays--phenomenal, and so easy to make! We had started an 8.5 lb shoulder in a large Dutch oven, and realized 8hrs later that it was supposed to be in a roasting pan. Transferred pans without a problem and later made a pan gravy for the mash.

Even though we couldn't find the cut with skin-on, we're pretty sure we can order it for next time, with some advance notice. We live in Chicago and were able to find a beautiful shoulder on hand at our small local Mexican grocery/butcher store. Great quality, fresh, and only $2 /lb!

We served the pork with the parsnip & potato mash from this site (we used some homemade goose & duck broth in the mash which gave it a supremely rich taste), and also made an apple & kale slaw, which was a perfect accompaniment to the pork.

We're already planning to make this again for a large get-together next month. Thanks for the terrific recipe--it's our new fave!

100_2379

almost 2 years ago Michelle Meeks

I made this last week, however, I could NOT find a bone-in, pork shoulder with the skin on. I ended up using a fresh ham from Whole Foods. It was great, but I would still like to try it with the correct cut of meat. Any suggestions on where I can find such a cut?

Stringio

over 1 year ago Brian Buckley

You should be able to find a pork shoulder (also called a boston, or boston butt, or just a butt) at most grocery stores or meat markets without the skin. You may have to special order one with the skin though.

Open-uri20130430-19743-1dc3ef8

about 2 years ago Polly Crawford

I had this recipe for a few months. Finally made it this weekend. I didn't know if I was to cook it covered or uncovered. I left it covered overnight and realized it wasn't going to get crispy unless it was uncovered. I was amazed at the amount of juices there was in the pan for basting. My husband made garlic mashed potatoes and a phenomenal gravy with the drippings! WOW! Our company thoroughly enjoyed it! Can't wait to make it again!

Open-uri20130430-19743-1dc3ef8

about 2 years ago Polly Crawford

I had this recipe for a few months. Finally made it this weekend. I didn't know if I was to cook it covered or uncovered. I left it covered overnight and realized it wasn't going to get crispy unless it was uncovered. I was amazed at the amount of juices there was in the pan for basting. My husband made garlic mashed potatoes and a phenomenal gravy with the drippings! WOW! Our company thoroughly enjoyed it! Can't wait to make it again!

Default-small

about 2 years ago Kelly D

OK, so how do you know when its DONE? I put a smaller shoulder (approx 4 lbs) in the oven last night around 9pm, and we plan to eat around 6pm tonight; compensating for the smaller roast and 21 hrs., I cooked it overnight only at 170 deg, and only turned it up to 225 this morning around 6am, but I don't want this amazing smelling baby to OVERcook! Should I turn it off for a few hours and then turn back on? Or should I turn down the temp? [And I also learned that we have one of those ovens that turns off after 12 hours - who knew? Luckily I caught it pretty quickly!]

Default-small

about 2 years ago Susige

It should cook to an internal temperature of 160 - which to me means pull it out at about 145-150 as it will continue to cook as it rests. I had the same issue with trying to hold it until dinner tonight so mine cooked overnight in the oven at 215 and I will leave it there until around noon and see where the temperature is. Hope that helps!

Default-small

about 2 years ago Susige

Kelly, I too started wondering as I've never cooked one of these before. Evidently it's not like a regular roast. I asked on the Hotline, here's the link and the answers I'm receiving. Let me know how yours turns out!
http://www.food52.com/hotline...

Default-small

about 2 years ago Kelly D

Thanks so much Susige! My husband - who is working from home - already pulled it (around noon) b/c it had reached 160 degrees, but based on the answers to your Hotline question maybe now I'll have him put it back in the oven around 4pm ... it smelled SO good before I left for work - can't wait for dinner!

Default-small

about 2 years ago Susige

If he put it in the fridge, make sure he pulls it out an hour or so before so come back to room temp. And I'd probably kick the oven up to 275 too since it seems to need to reach 180-185 to really get tender.

Default-small

about 2 years ago Kelly D

So I just have to report back on how absolutely fantastic this turned out. Having reached 160 by noon we took out of oven between 12-4, and put back in around 4pm - which worked perfect for dinner a couple hours later! It was divine!

Stringio

over 1 year ago Brian Buckley

If you want succulent pulled pork, you should cook to an internal temp of 195-205 at low temperature. At 160, the fat, collagen and tendons will not have broken down and you will end up with a chewy pork roast. At around 195 everything is seriously juicy and falls apart. I've been smoking pork shoulders for the last couple of years. Time is less important than internal temp, but you can figure on 1-1.5 hours per pound.

Default-small

about 2 years ago Susige

First steps done, nine pound bone in, skin on shoulder in the hot oven roasting for 30 minutes.... seasonings with vinegar and maple syrup mixed and sitting ready to plop on the skin after I turn it over and then put it to bed for the night. I have high anticipations to see what awaits me tomorrow morning upon my arising - that is if I can sleep through the aromas that I know will be sneaking up the stairs tonight!

Default-small

about 2 years ago Susige

What a beautiful site to behold and smells to inhale this morning! My little pretty has been slow cooking at 215 for 12 hours and is already at an internal temperature of 142. Since we aren't eating until after 7:00 tonight, I've turned the oven down to 170 (the lowest mine will go) hoping it will slow down the cooking time. I may have to turn it off sooner than I thought but that's okay, it'll all work out - I can't wait for dinner tonight with our friends!

Picture_2

about 2 years ago NakedBeet

This recipe looks lovely, but with a toddler in the house, I'm too paranoid to leave the oven on for this length of time, especially, asleep! Can you suggest an alternate cooking time and temperature?

Default-small

over 2 years ago Canuck

i live in canada but we don't have matilda here. can you suggest a substitute?

Default-small

almost 2 years ago FrancineL

I'm from Canada as well and what comes to mind is "Kronenbourg 1664" which you can easily find at any good liquor store. Hope it helps

Default-small

over 2 years ago Riverdogs

I also learned my oven has an automatic shut off, after 12 hours. The oven shut down at 4:30 AM. I fired it back up at 8:30 AM. I'll serve the roast later today, adding a few hours at 220 degrees, and of course finish it at 450, per the recipe. I think it will be OK.

Default-small

over 2 years ago Michelle Arianne

ENunn, I just made this -- it's delicious!!! One thing, I fell asleep last night and totally forgot about getting this baby in the oven. So I woke up at 5AM (unheard of!) thinking about. Got it in the oven at 6 AM, turned the temperature to 275 (trying to compensate for the late start) until noon, then turned it down to 200 and it was perfectly ready in time for dinner. Also, I do live in Chicago so Matilda is plenty available. But I did find Matilda at World Market so I'm guessing that they may carry it in other markets too.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Way to go, Michelle! Make sure you try it the loooooong way, too. What did you serve it with? Matilda is such a special beer. It's should be available worldwide.

I'm so glad you liked the dish, and thank you for saying so. How is Chicago? I hear it's still a bit Chicachilly. It's beautiful here in Charleston, but I do miss seeing that lake.

Default-small

over 2 years ago Michelle Arianne

Hi E - Since it was a weekday, I just made roasted cauliflower with it (trying to feed us all healthier stuff). I think it would taste great with any mashed veggies -- maybe mashed celery root/potato combo? There were plenty of leftovers for sandwiches and tacos! The next time we're having friends over I'm making this for a taco party in which case I will be trying the looooong way. I like to keep things easy since we all have young kids, but I want to serve GOOD also!

Matilda is awesome and I just saw it at Whole Foods today. Chicago is chilly - our Sunday t-ball game was glove-worthy weather! Charleston is lovely.

Default-small

over 2 years ago minosmama

we had this for dinner last night. it was incredible!!!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Delia, that makes me so happy! It thrills me. Don't forget to make sandwiches.

Ramos_margarita_683_ret_copy

over 2 years ago negramodelo

Thank you. I will let you know.

Ramos_margarita_683_ret_copy

over 2 years ago negramodelo

I'm going to make this tonight. I'm wondering whether the shoulder needs to be covered when it goes into the oven.
Thank you

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

No! Let me know what you think about it.

Stringio

over 2 years ago lakelurelady

Congratulations ENunn. This is a keeper. It looks so succulent.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

I hope you'll let me know if you try it. I'm so happy with this win.

Photo-1

over 2 years ago Meatballs&Milkshakes

Congratulations! That looks amazing!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Why, thank you M&M!

Default-small

over 2 years ago jenniebgood

Congratulations ENunn! I want to crawl in that picture and start eating!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Hey, JbG: I feel the same way! The pic makes me want to make it again, right now. wish I could take credit for that gorgeous photo, by James Ransom. He is brilliant. The Food52 staff makes us all look very good, don't they? But make the dish and tell me what you think!

Default-small

over 2 years ago sarah k.

This sounds divine, although I must admit to being a little shy about using so much maple syrup. Would it be ruined if I only used 1/4 cup?

Also, I'm so curious about your feelings toward the River Cottage cookbook. It strikes me as so funny to say that it's "charmingly revolting" and I am dying to know why!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Hi, Sarah K. Just make the leap and use all the syrup. It's a big chunk of meat, and the recipe is part of a maple contest. Just say yes!

I love the River Cottage cookbook, but it is very meaty. My head swims after reading it for an extended period, but I just love it. It's very, um, focussed. And like I said: charming!

Spiceroute

over 2 years ago Madhuja

Congratulations ENunn! Gorgeous recipe and I cannot wait to make it!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thanks! Let me know what you think!

Terry_close

over 2 years ago TerryKes

This deserves to be the winner! I made it for Easter dinner and was told it was the Easter mainstay from here on! Thanks for sharing something so tasty and so very easy!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you! I love hearing that. Love it!

3-bizcard

over 2 years ago sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Congratulations ENunn, beautiful recipe and I will be making it very soon.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you! I'm looking forward to hearing how you like it!

Sausage2

over 2 years ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Congrats ENunn! I agree with inpatskitchen - completely, utterly mouthwatering!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you so much F&S!

Dscn3274

over 2 years ago inpatskitchen

Congratulations!! Absolutely mouth watering!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you!

Img_1958

over 2 years ago gingerroot

Congratulations! This is one of those recipe gifts that keep on giving...amazing meal on Sunday, sandwiches with fennel-red cabbage slaw on Monday, pork tacos on Tuesday and soup tonight.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you dear gingerroot! That makes me very happy. I think it makes amazing sandwiches, too. I'm dying to know what you put in the soup.

Img_1958

over 2 years ago gingerroot

I made my version of posole - I pureed roasted garlic, sauteed onions, oregano, salsa (b/c I had it on hand - next time roasted chiles!), cilantro, hominy and added the mixture to the stock from the bones and skin. Then I added more hominy and topped it with cheese and sour cream. It was delicious!

036

over 2 years ago aargersi

Abbie is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Congratulations! That is one good lookin' hunk o pork!

036

over 2 years ago aargersi

Abbie is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Congratulations! That is one good lookin' hunk o pork!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thanks, aargersi! That sounds so dirty! I love it!

Mrs._larkin_370

over 2 years ago mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

congrats Emily! Can't wait to make this.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you mrslarkin--so happy!

Christine-28_small(1)

over 2 years ago cheese1227

Congrats Emily! Great recipe.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you C1227! I really appreciate it. Yours is a great recipe as well, and I am looking forward to making it.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you C1227! I really appreciate it. Yours is a great recipe as well, and I am looking forward to making it.

Csbillustration_profile

over 2 years ago cookshootblog

This looks amazing. I love to smoke a pork shoulder, but can hardly wait to try this method. Will definitely be puting my order in with the butcher soon!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you cookshootblog. Let me know what you think.

Sausage2

over 2 years ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Congratulations ENunn! This looks just insanely good. Love slow roast pork.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thanks F&S. Let me know what you think if you try it. It makes great sandwich leftovers.

Stringio

over 2 years ago lakelurelady

Congrats on being a finalist with this succulent roast. Slow pork is a favorite and I love the flavors you have given this.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you! I'm thrilled.

Ozoz_profile

over 2 years ago Kitchen Butterfly

Congratulations. MAtilda sounds like Maltina, a malty, non-alcoholic drink that I've been meaning to try with pork! Well done

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you so much, KB. I am looking up Maltina asap. I love malt--love it. Except malted-milkballs. Negatory on those.

3-bizcard

over 2 years ago sdebrango

Suzanne is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Congratulations on the finalist spot, love pork roast this sounds amazing.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you so much. It is such an amazing feeling to be a finalist. All day yesterday, I was extremely productive. And it is carrying over today!

Photo_squirrel

over 2 years ago LE BEC FIN

This is a terrific recipe. I do have one suggestion- plse add the ounces of Matilda to the ingredients list, as many of us are not from Chicago and will be using an alternate!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you LBF! Here are some notes on Matilda that will help you, I hope.

http://www.gooseisland...

Summer_2010_1048

over 2 years ago Midge

LBC, I couldn't find Matilda where I live so I used Ommegang BPA , which was super tasty, but I've seen Matilda at package stores and Whole Foods in the Boston area.

Photo_squirrel

over 2 years ago LE BEC FIN

midge, th you for being so considerate! i don't know why e wouldn't add the number of ounces to her recipe- it would make it alot easier for every chef not to have to look it up, but plse tell how many ounces you used? thx much!
mindy

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Hey, LBF. I thought the link about Matilda would help you, I'm sorry. I just opened it and the big bottle, according to the site, is 650 mL

Availability:
Year Round
Bottles: 4pks, 650mL

Christine-28_small(1)

over 2 years ago cheese1227

Congrats, Emily! I have made this roast almost as many times as the Maple Walnut Cream Tart! My family loves it!

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Dear C1227! I am equally enamored of your tart--but have not net made. It is on my to-do-list for sure. So inventive, and I am a giant walnut freak. Congrats to you, too. By the way, I just read in an old Charleston cookbook that if you rub a walnut (out of the shell) on floor and furniture scratches, they disappear. And it works.

Cathybarrow_allrecipes_%c2%a9_2014

over 2 years ago MrsWheelbarrow

Cathy is a trusted source on Pickling/Preserving.

Good gracious Emily, here it is Passover eve and all I can think of is this ham. Glad it's coming up on Easter, too, as I've taken to embracing all faiths, particularly surrounding festive foods. This is gorgeous, and will be making it's DC debut tout suite.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you, dear MrsW! Embrace the roast! Let me know what you think when you make it. I will be seeing you soon!

Summer_2010_1048

over 2 years ago Midge

Hurray Emily!! !! I had a feeling about this gorgeous roast of yours.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thanks, Midge! I will make it for you and your man, once I get a table!

Summer_2010_1048

over 2 years ago Midge

Double hurray! Had I seen this earlier, I may have not made it this weekend but I'm SO glad I did. It was ever bit as amazing as I thought it would be. One of the best parts is waking up to that delicious aroma and knowing you are in for a huge treat for dinner.

Junechamp

over 2 years ago ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Congrats! What an innovative recipe. What would you suggest as a substitute for the ale for someone who is highly allergic to hops?

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Gosh, CJ. I do not know. I think that might be a question for the Food52 Hotline! Thanks!

Gator_cake

over 2 years ago hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

Congratulations! This sounds positively mouth-watering.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you HLA! I"m so excited!

Img_1958

over 2 years ago gingerroot

Congratulations on being a finalist! This is a beauty of a roast.

Food52_photo

over 2 years ago ENunn

Thank you so much. I am thrilled. It is amazing how being a part of the Food52 community makes me so crazy-ass happy!

Img_1958

over 2 years ago gingerroot

I can't remember the last time I was so excited - and determined - to try a recipe. After a day of calling around, I finally found a pork shoulder last Friday and popped this into the oven Saturday night. Wowza! 18 hours of slow roasting with your marinade does wonders for a pork shoulder. I am so happy to have the leftovers tonight! Thanks for a fantastic recipe.

Christine-28_small(1)

about 4 years ago cheese1227

I learnd something about my oven making this. It shuts off after 12 hours! It must have thought I forgot it was on. The other very, very important thing for cooks to know about this is that you can pick at it while it's cooking and cover your tracks by basting a few extra times!!

Monkeys

over 4 years ago monkeymom

I had to go to 3 stores to find rind on.I also love the idea of eating this with your chow-chow! Perfect to cut the richness.

Food52_photo

over 4 years ago ENunn

Monkeymom, I love the idea of your P.S. recipe too. It looks fabulous. The chow-chow turned mine into a whole different ballgame, too. Nice tonic. Believe it or not, this dish actually looks WORSE than the horrible picture I took (I couldn't get my camera to work at all!), but it tastes amazing. So the people I served it to were surprised when they tasted it, I think.

Hib_kitchen

over 4 years ago MyCommunalTable

They always seem to have skin on pork shoulder on hand at Tony's in Chicago. I think there are several locations.

Food52_photo

over 4 years ago ENunn

Tony's! I didn't even think of Tony's. Thank you. I have to start going there. I think I'm shopping too prissily.

Green_apple_card

over 4 years ago TasteFood

Sounds phenomenal. You can bet an AGA oven was used for the long slow overnight cooking when the recipe inspiration was created - mmmmmmm.

Food52_photo

over 4 years ago ENunn

Thank you, TasteFood. I wonder. I have a great stove, but I can't imagine that you couldn't do this with a crummy one. Once the pretty crusty part starts to form (even on the rindless part) you're pretty much home free, and you can always turn on the broiler at the end. So easy.

Cathybarrow_allrecipes_%c2%a9_2014

over 4 years ago MrsWheelbarrow

Cathy is a trusted source on Pickling/Preserving.

You can't write up this recipe, entice us with these clever techniques, and expect us to wait to try it. I'm getting on a plane -- there had better be some leftovers.

Food52_photo

over 4 years ago ENunn

MrsW, you are welcome to come any time. We had sandwiches for a couple of days, even after serving it for a small dinner party. It's a lot more meat than you might imagine. And, you know: very porky so very addictive.