Crispy Rosemary Walnuts

By • October 7, 2010 • 14 Comments


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Author Notes: Here’s uncomplicated slow food at its best. These habit-forming, fragrant morsels are nice on a salad, or to eat out of hand, or baked in savory scones. And, unlike many savory nuts, these have a delicate scent, and a mild flavor that does not overwhelm that of the nuts. The technique of brining nuts before roasting at a low heat for a long time is from Sally Fallon’s “Nourishing Traditions.” I asked myself, “Why not add more flavor to the brine, which might then be absorbed by the nuts?” It works! I’ll be posting some other similar recipes as time permits over the next few months. Stay tuned . . . . . ;o)
AntoniaJames

Makes 2 cups of nuts

  • 2 cups of raw organic new-season walnut halves and large pieces
  • 2 branches of fresh rosemary, each 4-5 inches (preferably, just picked)
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  1. Bring 1 1/2 cups of water to a boil. Pour it into a glass or ceramic bowl with the rosemary branches and the salt.
  2. Cool to lukewarm, then stir it well.
  3. Add the nuts and allow them to soak for about 8 hours.
  4. Preheat your oven to 150 degrees Fahrenheit.
  5. Remove the rosemary branches, then drain the nuts and spread them on a large baking sheet.
  6. Roast for 12 – 15 hours, stirring two or three times during that period. Store in a tightly lidded container.
  7. Enjoy!!

Tags: Cocktail Party, nuts, roast, roast, savory, serves a crowd, Slow Cooking

Comments (14) Questions (0)

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Me_by_barbara_tyroler

over 3 years ago Nora

By the way, these were very, very good. The only way to eat walnuts from now on!

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

about 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Thank you, Nora! We're crazy about them, too. They're so addictive, they're dangerous. (And I apologize for the delay in responding. I've been totally consumed by client work since a few days after I posted this, so it's been a real challenge keeping up with the rather large volume of email messages coming from food52. I didn't see this comment until today.) ;o)

Me_by_barbara_tyroler

over 3 years ago Nora

They'll be out of the oven in about half an hour. I've been sampling, of course. Delicious.

Me_by_barbara_tyroler

over 3 years ago Nora

Hi, Antonia and all. I bought walnuts today and will try the recipe as written.

I'm wondering if the drained nuts could be cooked in a slow cooker, as well as in the oven. Cheers.

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

about 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

I don't think you can cook them in a slow cooker, as they need a lot of dry heat around the nuts, in order to get them crispy. I'm sure you figured that out already, though. Thanks for asking! ;o)

Me_by_barbara_tyroler

over 3 years ago Nora

Antonia and all, I bought walnuts today and will try the recipe as written. I do wonder--could the nuts be cooked in a slow cooker, rather than a low oven? Cheers.

Christine-28_small(1)

over 3 years ago cheese1227

AntoniaJames, I understand your point about adding flavor to the brine, but what does the brining itself accomplish? I'm just wondering.

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

over 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

It greatly improves their texture and flavor, once they've been slow roasted. You are essentially dehydrating the nuts by the long cooking in a slow oven. The nuts taste light (because they are, if you were to weigh them, lighter). Plus, and this is a big plus for me, there is no salt or oil on the surface of the nuts, which is often the case with traditional methods of flavoring nuts. I'm working on some variations, but alas, have so many other "distractions" this week (like client work, a remodeling project, etc.) Thanks for asking! ;o)

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

over 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Oh, and I've been told that brining also improves their digestibility and the body's absorption of the many nutrients in the nuts. I am not an expert on the subject, though, so I cannot confirm that the latter claim is true. ;o)

2010-09-15_14.22.07

over 3 years ago calendargirl

Soooo clever! Would there be any problem with simply doubling this recipe? Two cups seems like hardly any somehow!

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

over 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Yes, you can, but you probably won't need to double the water, depending on the size and shape of your soaking vessel. I'd soak the rosemary in 2 1/2 cups of water to start, then add more water if necessary to cover, after combining the brine and the nuts. Have fun!! ;o)

Me_by_barbara_tyroler

over 3 years ago Nora

I'm eager to try these. I routinely roast almonds, pecans, and cashews. The walnuts will be a nice addition. A local specialty store sells wonderful rosemary almonds, so I'll probably have to try your method with almonds, too. Any thoughts?

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

over 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Yes, I'm sure you could do this with almonds. Let me know, please, how they turn out! ;o)

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over 3 years ago drbabs

Barbara is a trusted source on General Cooking.

I'm so doing this.