David Eyre's Pancake

By • November 9, 2010 • 153 Comments


2,566 Save

Author Notes: This recipe comes from The Essential New York Times Cookbook, and appeared in the Times in 1966. Forty years later, readers are still making the pancake with no less bliss. What keeps cooks faithful to one recipe is often some confluence of ease and surprise. Eyre’s pancake possesses both. A batter of flour, milk, eggs, and nutmeg is blended together, then poured into a hot skillet filled with butter and baked. Anyone confused? I didn’t think so. The surprise comes at the end, when you open the oven door to find a poufy, toasted, utterly delectable-looking pancake. It soon collapses as you shower it with confectioners’ sugar and lemon juice, slice it up and devour it. It’s sweet and tart, not quite a pancake and not quite a crepe. But lovable all the same. Cooking Notes: Don’t overmix the batter, or the pancake will be tough – a few lumps are fine. This is the moment to call your well-seasoned iron skillet into service.Amanda Hesser

Serves 2 to 4

  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup whole milk
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • Pinch of nutmeg
  • 4 tablespoons (one half stick) of unsalted butter
  • 2 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar
  • Juice of half a lemon
  1. Heat oven to 425 degrees. Combine the flour, milk, eggs, and nutmeg in a bowl. Beat lightly. Leave the batter a little lumpy.
  2. Melt the butter in a 12-inch skillet with a heatproof handle. When it is very hot, pour in the batter. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes, until the pancake is golden brown.
  3. Sprinkle with the sugar and return briefly to the oven. Sprinkle with lemon juice, and serve with jelly, jam, or marmalade.

Tags: breakfast, pancakes, sweet

Comments (153) Questions (4)

Default-small
Default-small
Wrong_apple

26 days ago sevenfaces

Light, yet luxurious, like eating a sugary lemony thin cloud! First time I've ever made a pancake in an oven so I was apprehensive, there is no turning back now I'm afraid. Fantastic.

Default-small

about 1 month ago jolene278

We love dutch babies!

Default-small

about 1 month ago dja

I think this is called a flop over as ell.I have had it with sour cream and raspberry on top, just amazing.

Default-small

about 1 month ago Erin

My family has always called this a "Poof." Yummy!

Default-small

about 1 month ago Barbara

I have the cast iron popover - look for it in a antique store.

Default-small

about 1 month ago Cassandra

My mother started making this recipe 40 years ago. Always a treat! As I now have her well- seasoned cast iron pan, I'll give it a try. Thanks for the recipe!

Default-small

about 1 month ago Nancy Charlton

Oops, very important: right size container. Rounded sides, batter 1/2 to 3/4 inch in depth. My kids liked the smallest Le Creuset for a single helping, which they made for themselves every afternoon after school.

Default-small

about 1 month ago Nancy Charlton

Like LisaD and others, I make this in the ratio, per serving, of 1egg, 1/4 c each of flour and milk (any proportion of milk and cream), salt, and 1 T. butter. This came from Sunset Magazine in the '70s, featured as Seattle Dutch Babies. These were mixed in the blender and poured into the pan hot from the oven with the melted butter, baked 20 minutes without opening the oven door. While baking, cook some sausages--sine qua non accompaniment. Some apples or oranges slices are great too. Yes this the same basic recipe as crêpes, popovers, Yorkshire pudding. I've been trying to find some cast iron popover pans and find only thin steel or aluminum. I'd appreciate knowing of a source (hint-hint, Provisions).

Default-small

about 1 month ago LisaD

My family has been making this since the late 70s when a college roommate introduced me to it. We use the alt ratio of 1/4 C flour, 1/4 C milk and 1 egg (perfect for one person) and scale it up accordingly. We prefer a "fatter" version, so we might have 3-4 eggs in one cast-iron skillet. You get a custardy bottom and nice crisp edges. A few months ago, I threw in some cooked cubed butternut squash and topped with maple syrup for a great brunch.

Default-small

about 1 month ago gwillikerrs

This cooks wonderfully in my seasoned wok...

Julistache

4 months ago juliunruly

Okay so I messed this recipe up – twice – and it still came out great. 1. I didn't have milk on hand, so I took a risk and used half and half. 2. I had the ingredients combined and was about to put them in the pan, when I realized I forgot to even put the half and half in. So I whisked it in very gently, so as not to lose all lumps per the instructions.

The result was very eggy, very luxurious, and very delicious. Super thin, with a delicately crisp bottom. I could see this becoming some kind of cult item at a brunch spot in a metro area, it's so delicious, simple, and beautiful. Used Meyer lemon, and a touch of maple. No additional butter was needed, obviously.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

3 months ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

It's super forgiving -- really the recipe version of a good friend.

Default-small

8 months ago Tom scheerer

I've been making this from the nyt recipe for thirty years. They republish it now and then. However I remember it as all 2's ( 1/2 cup flour, 1/2 cup milk, 2 eggs, 1/2 stick butter It's more rhythmically poetical this way and doesn't fail. In fact its puffy crisp and custardy at center and rises around edges too......maybe even more photogenic!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

8 months ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thanks for your comment and recipe notes -- I love recipes with easy proportions, and I look forward to trying your version. Not sure if you saw this but there's a good story behind this pancake, which I wrote about here: http://food52.com/blog...

Default-small

10 months ago fhp

This looks a little like a yorkshire pudding pancake.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

8 months ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Yes, it is a bit like yorkshire pudding -- definitely the same family.

Default-small

10 months ago minda

mom made this from the magazine section. still have the clipping, not the mom(:()

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

10 months ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Minda, thanks for your comment. It underscores one of the best things about recipes -- how they preserve memories of important people in our lives. How nice that you grew up with this great recipe!

Default-small

11 months ago Trena

I like to split this with my husband after dinner when we're craving something warm and sweet. Delicious!

Image

about 1 year ago Bethcooks

Will be making these again and again. Thank you.

Default-small

about 1 year ago Felnr

Just made these. So so yummy.

Default-small

about 1 year ago Felnr

I might add that my daughter just beseeched me to make more, saying, "Those pancakes are the best things I've ever tasted. It is my now new most favorite food."

Default-small

over 1 year ago shozgirl

Been making often since finding this recipe. Definitely prefer the cast iron, often only hv half and half on hand...throwing some blueberries in either with the butter or on top,of the batter in pan is yummy. Hv done bananas, other berries as well.

Default-small

over 1 year ago Flanerie

I've also made this for decades, every week or so! For our family of 4, I double the recipe and use a 13x9 glass dish. Preheat dish with 1-2 Tbsp butter. Often I throw in a layer of thinly sliced apple sprinkled with cinnamon sugar to soften for about 7 min before pouring in the batter.... Mmm!

Default-small

over 1 year ago Tegans-mom

I had never heard of this type of pancake until a few weeks ago when I was looking for something new to serve for a holiday breakfast. I do believe this is one of those recipes that everyone has a name to describe. Recipes I found online all called this a Dutch Baby. I can't wait to try it!

Img_6760

over 1 year ago DjeenDjeen

My great uncle used to make this for my mother growing up in Brooklyn. They called this a "ma-lin." I searched for the genesis of this word and found that the old Polish word for pancake was "mlin."

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 1 year ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Haven't heard this name before -- thanks!

Default-small

over 1 year ago rocombo

The last time I made these pancakes was at a friend's country house and I used two pans, one cast iron, one non-stick. The cast iron was superior, by far!

Stringio

over 1 year ago annasmithclark

I am not the author but would say (having made the recipe almost weekly since I found it) that cast iron is the most ideal as it goes from the stove top to the oven. Adding the dough once the skillet is really hot give is nice crunchy edges. No need to be non stick if the pan is well seasoned. What kind other pan were you considering?

Default-small

over 1 year ago Venture

Mmm This looks like a lil happy delight. Now I see you used a cast iron, is this the only kinda skillet you can use to make this pancake? does it need to be cast iron and non stick?

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 1 year ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Any good, oven-safe pan will work. Cast iron gives the pancake a nice crisp bottom but no need to go out and buy a pan to make this. Just use what you've got!

Default-small

over 1 year ago Danielle Marie

I only had half/half and it turned out fine. Yum!

Default-small

over 1 year ago darby1736

I just made the pancake for supper and--WOW--it was really delicious! Thanks for making this old recipe available.

Default-small

over 1 year ago darby1736

I just made the pancake for supper and--WOW--it was really delicious! Thanks for making this old recipe available.

Default-small

over 1 year ago annasc

Wonderful alternative to regular pancakes. So much easier on the chef and great for brunches with friends!! Family loves these

Open-uri.10067

almost 2 years ago Hina Khokhar

Would this recipe work well in a 10-inch skillet? That's all I have =(

Img_7818

almost 2 years ago EmilyC

I've made it in a 10" skillet and it works fine!

Default-small

almost 2 years ago Karen Conner

This really takes me back....shortly after the "Great Depression" my Uncle George drove around the city of Wilmington, Delaware and soon became know as the Waffle Man. He would cook waffles and sprinkle Confectioners Sugar on them while customers watched...somewhat like an Ice Cream truck would do back during the 60's and early 70's. Of course his treat was much more like "Funnel Cake" with the exception he cooked Waffles. Thanks for the wonderful memory and I can't hardly wait to give this a try for tonights supper....Thanks :-)

Default-small

almost 2 years ago Jenna Kane

How fun to see this again after all of these years... My Dad and I used to make this when I was a kid but I thought it was called "Pancake Omelet". Dad would serve it with Karo syrup for me as a kid, I guess but I remember fondly the lemon juice and powdered sugar! It;s a nice (mature) sort of breakfast!!

Food54_profile_pic

about 2 years ago Ms. T

I needed a little comfort today and this recipe delivered the breakfast hug I was looking for. Like a cross between popovers and pancakes--a perfect hybrid if there ever was one.

Default-small

about 2 years ago Nina Beana

You can totally make this with 1 TBSP of butter and 1% milk.
The first time I made it, I made it just how the recipe is written but found it too buttery (I know, is that possible?) I prefer less butter and really couldn't tell the difference using the lower fat milk; your waist line will thank you. It's delicious!

Default-small

about 2 years ago lmiller100

Second comment below ("Sauteeing diced, tart apples in the butter first and then pouring the batter over them is a popular variation for our family..." looks promising

xo

Img_7818

about 2 years ago EmilyC

I'm so late to the game it's embarrassing, but I love this recipe. Made it tonight for the first time, served with scrambled eggs...perfect for a simple, delicious meal after a long week.

Default-small

about 2 years ago Crispini

Love this recipe and have made it for decades. Like many others here, we call it a Dutch Baby. I've come up with many alterations, but the classic, with powdered sugar and lemon, is the one I return to. I think it's best in a deep cast iron skillet, and I melt the butter in the skillet in the oven. An old fashioned egg beater is superb for getting the batter frothy, then it is immediately poured into the foaming butter. Sauteeing diced, tart apples in the butter first and then pouring the batter over them is a popular variation for our family.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 2 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thanks for weighing in with your experience!

Default-small

about 2 years ago BocaCindi

Never thought of chocolate with this. I usually saute some berries while the pancake is baking and serve them on top. Now, Jeneric, you have put a chocolate drizzle idea in my head. Pancake. Sauteed berries. Chocolate drizzle. Vanilla ice cream. Well, why not! Would love to be in the same room with so many people on this site who have the same 'cook with abandon' philosophy. Thanks.

Default-small

about 2 years ago natalia.karplus

So good and so easy! I will never make regular pancakes again! I agree with a comment above that the effort to deliciousness ratio is fantastic!

Default-small

about 2 years ago natalia.karplus

So good and so easy! I will never make regular pancakes again! I agree with a comment above that the effort to deliciousness ratio is fantastic!

Eydie_picture

over 2 years ago Eydie Desser

Deeelicious! My dad and husband went nuts over it.

Default-small

over 2 years ago lazychef

Anyone else recognize this recipe from the Klutz kid's cookbook? Man, did I ever love me some Dutch Babies growing up...

Default-small

over 2 years ago culture_connoisseur

Katey501 ~ At it all yourself! Hm I think I'll do the same tomorrow morning :) I've been contemplating this recipe for a while it looks so amazing. Sugar and lemon it is for me.

Kmd0412.2

over 2 years ago Katey501

I make this every couple of months for myself using the Pyrex pie plate method and am not embarrassed to say that I don't share with anyone! I've topped it with Cherry Amaretto syrup I've made, but love the simplicity of confectioners' sugar and lemon.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 2 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Pancake confessions! Hey if you make it, don't you deserve to eat it all? :)

Default-small

over 2 years ago culture_connoisseur

Ate it all yourself?! Hmmm I think I'll do the same tomorrow morning! I've been contemplating this recipe for a while it looks so amazing. Sugar and lemon it is for me.

Default-small

over 2 years ago Annalise Roberts

I hadn't made this pancake ages, (especially since I've been gluten-free for close to nine years) but it converted beautifully. If you need to avoid gluten, you can still make a tender, "poufy" pancake. Try the recipe at MyGluten-FreeTable.com and let me know how you like it! http://mygluten-freetable...

Default-small

almost 3 years ago warriorL

Fantastic served with fresh peaches warmed with a little cinnamon, vanilla or I've also served it with fresh strawberries, I prefer the warm peaches..fantastic!

Default-small

almost 3 years ago suess

This has been my favorite for years. Current jelly is nice with this.

Sharonhead

almost 3 years ago Chef Sharon

http://on.fb.me/kwbuiU Amazing!!!!!! My guitar man is still in bed, I hope there is some left when he gets up!! Thank you. ~Sharon

Default-small

almost 3 years ago spaetzlegirl

don't think i've ever encountered anything else with such an insanely high ratio of decadent deliciousness to effort. i'm never making regular pancakes again...

Default-small

about 3 years ago anne

I made this for breakfast with friends this morning, served with macerated beach plums, concord grape jam, or maple syrup. I used granulated sugar and 3 tablespoons of butter. It was perfect, not too sweet, just filling enough, and more special than pancakes. It'll be a staple from now on.

Default-small

about 3 years ago Baywife

I made Dutch Babies every Sunday morning for probably 20 years -- until my children went away to college. I made them in a Pyrex pie plate -- 10" for a 3 egger and 9" for 2 eggs. The ratio was 1 egg to 1/4 C flour, 1/4 C milk, and a pinch of salt made in the blender. Also, 1 T butter per egg, melted in the pie plate in the oven. Nutmeg was sprinkled on after baking, then topped with powdered sugar and lemon. Raspberries for holidays!

Amanda, you should definitely create a family tradition with these. They're easy but spectacular.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thanks for your comment -- love the details from experience!

Default-small

about 3 years ago MenuGeek

So good and so easy, thanks!

Default-small

about 3 years ago Thartge

Mine didn't rise. Too small a pan? (I used a 9 inch).

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Just saw your comment -- sorry for the delay. Hmm. Even in a 9-inch pan, the pancake should rise. Was your oven at full temperature before putting the pan in? That's the only thing I can think of that might prevent the pancake from spreading up the sides of the pan.

Port2

about 3 years ago nogaga

I'm late to the game, but I just made it with 100% buckwheat flour. It was fantastic!

Port2

about 3 years ago nogaga

Sorry, I'm not working the comments section software well... Amanda: I made it with 100% organic buckwheat flour, and it was-- I keep repeating myself-- just great. It had a bit of the toothsomeness and deeper flavour of old-school Parisian street crepes, when they were still made with buckwheat flour. That's where the idea came from.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thanks for the follow-up. I look forward to trying this!

Port2

about 3 years ago nogaga

I made this last night with buckwheat flour, and it came out spectacularly! Just beautiful.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

So interesting -- did you replace all the flour with buckwheat flour or just a portion? Would love to know the specifics. Thanks!

Default-small

about 3 years ago passthepepper

Could a dessert be any easier, more beautiful, more impressive? It was a cold and stormy night last night, and with the house empty, I decided to give finally it a try; sheer heaven! I grew up in a Norwegian/Swedish home in which crispy, buttery "plattar" (cooked on top of the stove in my great grandmother's cast iron skillet) were a weekly staple. My mother often said her mother cooked the oven baked version of Swedish pancakes (similar to a Dutch Baby), but for some reason mine never did, so I was so thrilled to find this recipe!

I served it up with some homemade lingonberry jam leftover from Christmas, standing at the counter, coffee cup in one hand, pulling off poufy, buttery pieces with the other, right out of the pan; had to keep myself from eating the whole thing! (How many is this intended to serve? lol) I can't wait to try it with fresh raspberries (lemon and raspberries being a classic Scandinavian pairing), and savory fillings!

Oh, the only downside, like Bushra, I too (though I had an oven glove in my left hand) grabbed the hot handle while sprinkling on the sugar, yikes!
Can't thank you enough for this amazing recipe! I think I'll use it next New Year in place of my standard Yorkshire pudding recipe as well; quicker, easier, and foolproof, and will also experiment with a bit less butter as you mentioned...scary thought, thinking I could have easily finished off a half stick of butter, solo!
Thank you, Amanda!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

We've all been there, eating straight from the pan, not inviting anyone else to join us in the kitchen. Thanks for your note!

Default-small

about 3 years ago stephen_corona

Shared this recipe with my family the second I took the first bite. Wonderful, simple breakfast. Much less mess than the traditional pancake.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

I like the one-pot detail, too.

Default-small

about 3 years ago peanutbutterjellygirl

I made this recipe for brunch today. I didn't have fresh lemon, so I mixed bottled juice in with my milk to curdle it. It came out light and wonderful, with a nice custard feel. I substituted and changed some amounts in order to stick to my diet - 1% milk, 2 tbsp of butter, 1 tsp of canola oil and sprinkled 1 tbsp of powdered sugar and 2 tsp of maple syrup.

This is a keeper. My husband and I really enjoyed this recipe. I like that the recipe is good for a household of two.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thanks for the tips!

Default-small

about 3 years ago Jane Eyrehead

Obviously this is a recipe that lends itself to infinite variety. I know it as a Dutch Baby (maybe because it came from Deutschland?) and it would be served sprinkled with lemon juice and powdered sugar, yogurt and any fruit, although berries are best.

Amanda, we are using your new cookbook all the time. Good job there.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thanks -- thrilled that you're enjoying the book!

Default-small

about 3 years ago fitsxarts

i love this! made with meyer lemon, even burnt this a bit by accident and it was still wonderful. would like to try a savory version with spinach and cheese sprinkled on top.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Mmm, Meyer lemon!

Dsc_0205

about 3 years ago Daphne

We made Florence la Ganke's Three Day Marmalade last weekend and you're right, the pancake is delicious with marmalade!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

So thrilled that you made both! I love that marmalade.

Dsc_0205

about 3 years ago Daphne

me too!

Default-small

about 3 years ago Tamara177

We had great success cooking this in muffin tins for individual servings, adding blueberries on top.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Were they like popovers?

Default-small

about 3 years ago flossy

YUM. now i must collapse on the couch... even my husband who doesn't typically care for pancakes, came out of his office to take nibbles. a keeper for sure!

Default-small

about 3 years ago powerdiva

do you know the calories/fat? I'm snowed in here in Dallas. I made it this morning and now I want another one. I ate the whole thing once and I'm sure I will do it again.
The presentation is amazing too!

Phoenix

about 3 years ago Phoenix Helix

High on both! It's about 1000 calories per pancake. But this is classic comfort food & has the calories accordingly.

Default-small

about 3 years ago dbradley

It comes out to around 960 calories for the whole pancake. I'd call one serving 1/4th or 1/2 of that. Nearly half the calories come from the butter and, as others have noted, you can cut it in half to 2 tablespoons and still get good results. That would put a single serving of a quarter pancake under 200 calories.

Default-small

about 3 years ago EllenHoran

I I have been looking for this recipe for years! My neighbor growing up was a chef, and she taught me this in the 70's, looks identical, and have never been able to replicate. Thanks!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

So glad to be the place you've found it -- enjoy!

Kbh-canal

about 3 years ago matthewddsg

I made for this a quick breakfast yesterday morning. The delicate balance of flavours and the play between the confectioners sugar and the lemon made it a real delight. Thanks for a great recipe.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Glad you enjoyed it -- when I can get Meyer lemons, I use them in place of the regular lemon.

Default-small

about 3 years ago rocombo

This is a lovely recipe for the happiest food experience!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

I agree!

Pics_for_project_due_3-9-09_019

about 3 years ago maryw.s.

My first husband and I used to make this every Sat. morning for months and months. I found the recipe, called Dutch Baby, in a Vermont tourism magazine, and it called for the sauteed apples on top, over which we added maple syrup. Also made it in the glass pie plate. Haven't made it for current husband yet...

Summer_2010_1048

about 3 years ago Midge

I made this for breakfast this morning, with maple syrup and bacon, and wow! As my husband said, it's a total keeper.

Default-small

about 3 years ago meggoat

Dreaming about serving it this week with finely chopped bittersweet chocolate and toasted, slivered almonds as the topping...

Default-small

about 3 years ago Kitchen Catastrophy

My family brought this recipe over from German in 1930! One of my all time favorite breakfasts... we use a little more butter, no nutmeg and blend in the blender. Oh and a glass pie plate but otherwise exactly the same and filled with great child hood memories.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

I wonder if the texture is different when the batter is made in the blender -- maybe fluffier. Going to try it. Thanks.

Default-small

about 3 years ago oreos

Thanks for the recipe! Trying it out this weekend. This looks just like a traditional Finnish oven pancake. My husband's 88 year-old grandmother has made this for him since he was a small boy. Same ingredients except added sugar to the very runny batter. Except the Finns bake it in a big and deep baking tray, comes out insanely poufy before falling flat. Cut in squares and served with jam, cream or both. Always with a cup of coffee. Most Finnish restaurants include this with coffee after lunch.

I like this small version, can't wait to try it in a pan.

Default-small

about 3 years ago Bushra

I tried this recipe yesterday night, being stuck indoors due to the snow storm. Not that I would be out at 11 pm on a weeknight anyway but it feels good to put a little blame on the snow. I followed the recipe almost exactly, just that I reduced the butter to about 1/3 of the stick instead of half. It came out beautifully! In all my excitement I totally forgot that the frying pan I made it in had just come out of a blazing hot oven and grabbed the handle with my bare hand. Ouch. Other than that it was awesome. My family and I enjoyed it with blackberry preserves with my right hand holding on to an icepack :-/

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Ugh -- sorry to hear it. I've done that so many times -- eating dinner with an ice pack. Hope your hand feels better today.

Phoenix

about 3 years ago Phoenix Helix

Question: is the cast iron pan mandatory? I have an All-Clad stainless steel skillet that's ovenproof, but no cast iron.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Not mandatory -- a stainless steel skillet will do the trick as well!

Default-small

about 3 years ago erinmc2

I used a non-stick springform pan and it worked great!

Default-small

about 3 years ago scot_henk

I did a variation of this recipe this morning for my wife and I. What I changed was I used gluten free all purpose flour, and rice milk. This turned out fabulous. All I did was substitute equally. There may need to be a reduction in the milk, but only slightly. I used Nutella as a topping, and was very impressed with how quick and easy and delicious this recipe was.

Default-small

about 3 years ago meggoat

I heart Nutella.

554

about 3 years ago Laura_K

This was the recipe that led me to buy The Essential NY Times cookbook--saw the piece on Martha Stewart where she and Amanda did this and I immediately went and bought the cookbook and a new cast iron pan. I've served it as made per the recipe, I've added fresh fruit and whipped cream on top, I've filled it with both savory and sweet things and folded it over. It's really versatile. My fave is filled w ham and swiss-- crazy good!

Default-small

about 3 years ago Miche

As you can tell from the website url, it's actually The Wild Pear Co.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thank you.

Default-small

about 3 years ago Miche

A friend of mine once brought me some huckleberry jam from ... Montana... somewhere like that... and I could never find any until the other day when I came upon a jar in a restaurant/gourmet shop called Comfort in San Anselmo, CA. Made by The Pear Co. in Tomales. Their website is http://www.thewildpear...

Default-small

about 3 years ago Miche

it's almost like a clafoutis recipe I used to make (not traditional)

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

That's cool -- would love to try that with this recipe sometime.

Default-small

about 3 years ago cookingcat

This was lovely. Easy to prepare and beautiful to see coming out of the oven. This will be a weekend staple in my home. I served it with huckleberry preserves but will be trying it savory also. The blueberries would work well, thanks for the suggestion shozgirl!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Where did you get your huckleberry preserves? Is there an online source?

Default-small

about 3 years ago cookingcat

The huckleberries are from Hungry Horse, Montana. Here is their website. Enjoy!
http://www.huckleberrypatch...

Default-small

about 3 years ago shozgirl

I have made it w/blueberries many x now...just bought some nice blkberries so will try them too.

Default-small

about 3 years ago shozgirl

Oh and I have also sauteed some sliced bananas in the pan and then poured in the batter...yummy...however w/the berries i throw them on top of the batter after it sets a few seconds.

Default-small

about 3 years ago meggoat

Where has this recipe been all my life? I've made it three times, as a dessert, in as many weeks. First, with lingonberry preserves, next with grated bittersweet chocolate, seconds with sour cherry preserves, and last with nutella. This is the best dessert ever and one I plan on making at least once a week for the rest of my life (to make up for lost time) (I'm the same age as the website's name).

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Now, that's the spirit! Thanks for your note.

Default-small

about 3 years ago bret

my late wife, Kathy, made this excellent pancake many times over many years, always serving it with apple compote. It was the first meal I made for our sons following her wake and can attest to David's claim of ease and surprise.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thank you for your note.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Sorry sent before I was ready -- meant to add that it continues to amaze (and delight) me how many people have attachments to this recipe, and how it's played an important part in their family life. I made it again this morning with my kids -- hoping it'll become a family tradition.

Default-small

about 3 years ago erinmc2

I just made this for the first time this morning, and it was so easy and so yummy! I don't have a skilled, so used my stainless steel springform pan. It worked perfectly.

My husband drizzled Vermont grade A maple syrup on his, and I tried FigCoCo and strawberry rhubarb jam. I'm not sure I liked the FigCoCo on it...just didn't hit the right notes for me. I started dreaming of a brown sugar brulee on this with a punch of cinnamonin the pancake. Am I crazy?

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Sounds good to me!

Default-small

about 3 years ago choughton

Do you have any recommendations for butter substitution in this recipe? Perhaps something with half the butter. Or, would that just ruin the experience with this particular dish?

N815475290_4808168_5317

about 3 years ago java&foam

choughton, in looking around online, eyre's recipe appears to be the one with the most butter in it. paula dean from food network, who is known for her calorie-clogging meals only uses 3 Tbsp, followed by Martha Stewart with 2 Tbsp and some recipes that only use one tablespoon for the same skillet size as this recipe. the skillet is the most authentic way to make this one, but other recipes with less butter have been cooked in pyrex pie dishes and reportedly had good results (test at your own risk). i think because there are so few ingredients in this dish using actual butter is important since there is nothing to really cover up the slightly off taste of some butter substitutes. however, if you're up for experimenting, I would try "I Can't Believe It's Not Butter" Sticks. My mom started using them after she saw they had the "Good Housekeeping" seal of approval and only the most discerning could taste a small difference in her baked goods. if you go this route, i would opt for using less than 4 Tbsp, since you don't want the substitute to overwhelm the delicate taste of the pancake. a&m may have more ideas. here's the link to the sticks: http://bit.ly/gqpSdj

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thanks java&foam -- and agree that it's best to use butter, and it's ok to halve it. If there's any change I'd make it would be to use salted butter. Enjoy!

Default-small

about 3 years ago choughton

Many thanks for the advice. My wife and I made this with great success using half the butter in a corningware dish which we let preheat with the oven, allowing us to melt the butter right into that dish without having to heat it on the range. Totally delicious.

Default-small

about 3 years ago Stel

Dutch baby has been a favorite with us for leisurely weekend breakfasts for many years. Try it with sliced fresh peaches when in season, but not so many as to overpower the delicate pancake flavor. Simply luscious.

Default-small

about 3 years ago sgodwin

This looks suspiciously like Yorkshire pudding with some confectioners sugar tossed on top... which is fine, but I can't see attributing it to David Eyre when it's a simple, traditional recipe.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

about 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

I disagree -- the cooking method and pan selection make it different from Yorkshire pudding, even if the batter is similar. It is topped with not just confectioners' sugar, but lemon juice as well, and if it should be compared to any traditional recipe it should probably be compared to the German pancake or Dutch baby, both oven-baked pancakes. The recipe that appears closest to this one is from the St. Francis Hotel Cookbook, published in 1919. People add their names to recipes when they become favorites among family and friends -- if you read the addendum from the original blog post (see link), I think you'll agree that this recipe had special significance to the Eyre family: http://bit.ly/fy7O3G

N815475290_4808168_5317

about 3 years ago java&foam

i agree with amanda. mr. eyre was the one that introduced the food writer to the pancake and mr. eyre very likely ran into it while traveling or by word of mouth (such as from the st. francis hotel cookbook amanda mentioned or the "dutch babies" served at the Menca Cafe in Seattle around the turn of the century through the 1960s when it closed). many different cultures have fried/baked bread-type dishes like this one, which is why amanda's chef friend (from her NYT article on this very pancake in 2007) was so easily able to mesh this base with the Moroccan squab pie bisteeya and give it a savory chicken filling. either way, eyre's pancake seems to take much more history in a sweet enjoyment/breakfast dish (similar to the german "Apfelpfannkuchen", which this style of pancake is said to be a variation on) as opposed to the savory starchy supplement thought up in Britain during the mid-1700s as a inexpensive starchy supplement to pot roast gravy. for anyone who's ever made one of these, they know this pancake is not an afterthought or simple filler: its the main event...as it should be.

Default-small

over 3 years ago shozgirl

I made Sunday and threw some blueberries on it before going in the oven. Delicious. Definitely reminds me of the baked pancakes in Amsterdam that are savory as well as sweet. This will be a staple!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Ok, now I want to make it again!

Mail

about 3 years ago isabelita

Thanks for this idea. I'm making it now and adding blueberries.

Me

over 3 years ago Adriana

Ah, perfect Christmas morning breakfast for sleepyheads! I browned some apple slices for ours.

N815475290_4808168_5317

over 3 years ago java&foam

amanda, this reminds me a lot of the "dutch baby" pancake i use to make for my mom's breakfast in bed on their birthday. my sister and I never liked the "eggy" taste (we both associate that with french toast, something we both have bad memories with) and so we created a filling for the center.

we would thinly slice granny smith apples and caramelize them with brown sugar and cinnamon in a pan while the pancake baked and then when we took the pancake out, we would ladle this into the center of the pancake in place of the confectioner's sugar and lemon juice. it certainly changes the nature of the pancake, but the syrupy apples on top of the pancake made the most fantastic fall breakfast ever. i personally like it with the skins on (also easier that way) but peeled would work just as well.

i used to make them on only special occasions but the apple center was so well received they ask me to make it whenever I am home from college.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Like your variation! I, too, have bad french toast memories.

Face_hat_underpainting_1

over 3 years ago Queen of Spoons

Doubled the recipe & made it (for the first time) in a large cast iron skillet. Added a hint of lemon zest to the recipe and a reduced mixed berry sauce for a side. Came out beautifully puffy and a great balance to the "Scottish Eggs" both of which were served for a brunch the other day.

Love, love, love Food 52 folks. Having so many trustworthy opinions and examples makes it easy to try new recipes and have them work!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

So glad! And also happy to hear that what we set out to do -- create a site where crowdsourcing and curation and community result in a reliable source and fun place to be -- is working. Thanks for your thoughts!

K

over 3 years ago cowgirlculture

The Pancake House in Fort Worth, Texas serves these and the recipe is a secret. The owner doesn't even let the staff know how to make them. He premixes everything before the staff shows up. I had always wanted to know how to make them. When I saw this recipe on Martha Stewart show I was so excited and immediately made them! So easy and delish! I so want the cookbook now!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Too funny -- doesn't that guy know there are no secret recipes?

Default-small

over 3 years ago Helenegordon

I used to make this when first married in the 1970's. Made it
for my husband this morning--it came out perfectly just as I
remembered. He couldn't fathom pancakes without syrup
but didn't even want the jam I put out. Just crispy bacon and
we were set.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Thanks for your note!

Dsc_0205

over 3 years ago Daphne

Pretty and festive coming out of the oven, a nice thing to happen so easily first thing in the morning! I topped my slice with sifted powdered sugar, blueberry preserves, a slice of cold butter & a sprinkling of fleur de sel.... A. & G. had a lemon squeeze. Really fun breakfast and not too filling. Thank you!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

Like the touch of salt -- and very amused that you added yet more butter! Bravo!

Gaby_by_sarah

over 3 years ago gabrielaskitchen

Amanda, I was waiting for you to post this! It's one of my all time favorite breakfast recipes, shared with me by my houseguest brother this summer! I'm convinced that the best thing a houseguest can do is make their host these (dutch) babies.

@jeneric Oh! Chocolate would be nice, but I think the lemon is what makes this pancake shine!

Default-small

over 3 years ago jeneric

I agree, having made it tonight. It was the easiest dessert EVER! And it looked beautiful when it came out of the oven. I served it with roasted seckel pears and a little caramel sauce which complemented the lemon juice.

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

I think that's a great rule that we should all insist upon!

Tad_and_amanda_in_the_kitchen

over 3 years ago Amanda Hesser

Amanda is a co-founder of Food52.

And jeneric, glad yours turned out well. If you add chocolate next time, I won't tell anyone.

Default-small

over 3 years ago jeneric

Food 52ers: Would a little chocolate sauce ruin the integrity of this dessert? Normally I'm more citrus-minded, but for tonight's dinner, I'm thinking a little chocolate is in order.