Grandma Netta's Red Cabbage

By • November 17, 2010 • 12 Comments



Author Notes: My maternal step-grandmother was actually Italian but married my German/Swedish grandfather, whom she met while working in a German restaurant. She had to learn to cook good German & Swedish meals because that was all my grandfather would eat. When I stayed over, she always made me Italian food and him, calves liver & onions.....oh yuck!. Hey, I was 10 at the time. The 2 things I wish I had begged her to show me how to make where these wonderfully light potato dumplings (which I can still taste today) and her great sauerbraten. I did manage to squirrel away the red cabbage recipe from my Uncle, who still makes it every fall holiday meal. I know there are no onion or apples in this recipe. It is just a simple, light sweet-sour sauced cabbage dish. Here's to you, Grandma Annette, and to whoever gets the bay leaf.....the dishes are all yours. - StockoutStockout

Food52 Review: This delicious red cabbage was so simple to prepare—just dump the ingredients in a large pot, cover, and simmer for an hour. The glazing that occurs during the next uncovered phase (about 1/2 hour) not only concentrates the delicate sweet-and-sour flavor, but also creates a nice shine, which prevents the tender cabbage from looking dull on your plate. I didn’t miss the typical additions of apple and onion at all, as there was just the right amount of sweetness from the brown sugar. It’s a set-it-and-forget-it dish, which makes it an ideal holiday side. - MaddyA&M

Serves 6-8

  • 1 large head red cabbage (about 2 pounds)
  • 1/2 stick unsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 cup dark brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups vegetable stock (or chicken)
  • 1/2 cup good stout beer
  • 2 bay leaves
  • Salt & Pepper to taste
  1. Quarter, core and chop cabbage into 1/4" slices. Place all ingredients into a large 5 quart stockpot and simmer, covered, for 1 hour.
  2. After 1 hour, uncover and simmer until liquid is almost all gone and the cabbage is glazed.
Jump to Comments (12)

Comments (12) Questions (0)

Default-small
Default-small
Default-small

over 1 year ago rachelib

eating this out of the pot as is simmers done. Delicious made almost as directed (no beer)

Default-small

almost 2 years ago Tarragon

This is a wonderful recipe. For a weeknight I reduced the initial 1 hour to 8 minutes by using a pressure cooker. I also omitted the beer and just increased the vegetable stock. Will definitely make again - I like bd20009's idea of the balsamic vinegar to make up for the beer, but it really isn't necessary.

Open-uri20130203-7046-1u7cxkg-0

over 3 years ago Fran McGinty

I wanted to make a cabbage dish tonight I saw this and I am thinking about making it. The question i have is I don't like the taste of beer. I was wondering if in the final dish you can taste the stout?

Default-small

over 3 years ago bd20009

I couldn't taste it. It simmers for so long, the alcohol must cook out, and the stout gives it a depth of flavor. But not beer flavor :)

Default-small

over 3 years ago bd20009

I am really happy with the results! Used brown ale (all I had on hand) and substituted beef stock for the vegetable stock. I added a splash of good balsamic vinegar to make up for the brown ale substitution. Really tasty!

Default-small

over 3 years ago Stockout

Thank you, bd. I just made a batch myself this weekend to eat with sagegreen's winning latkes and a roasted miso chicken, also from here, which I am making tomorrow. Happy New Year to you!

Default-small

over 3 years ago Stockout

You could make this up to a week in advance. The vinegar and sugar help to preserve the cabbage and don't tell anyone but I once found a leftover container of this in my fridge that had to be 2 months old and it not only looked ok, it did not smell (yes, I know....cabbage??).

Mr_t_122509

over 3 years ago Mr. T

Can this be made in advance for T-Day and if so, how many days beforehand? Thank you! I'm really looking forward to making -- and eating -- this! ;o)

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

over 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Ooops. That was me. I was on Mr. T's computer and didn't realized he hadn't logged out . . . .;o)

Default-small

over 3 years ago Stockout

I wish I had said that a well as you have. I just assumed Netta added the stout to calm Grandpa down...lol

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

over 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Too funny!! I'm really looking forward to trying this recipe. And I'll be thinking about Netta, and your Grandpa, when I do!! (And also thinking about how my mother served herself liver and onions, happily, while we ate something else, and our reactions to the liver was, always, "Oh, yuck!" I have so been there.) ;o)

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

over 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

My mouth is watering, just reading this. So, so delicious sounding. Really like the addition of the stout . . . just a touch of bitterness to balance the sweetness of the cabbage and sugar. Love it!! ;o)