Fig and Blue Cheese Savouries

By • November 28, 2010 • 179 Comments


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Author Notes: If you are like me, you always offer to bring something when invited to someone’s house. I mean the offer, I always love an opportunity to cook for people, but sometimes it’s hard to come up with a quick idea on the fly. And when it’s one of those roaming parties – not a seated affair – choosing a dish that doesn’t have to be kept hot or cold or require and special equipment adds to the challenge. I tend to fall back on the same recipes, but I recently wanted to add one to my repertoire – after all, it gets to be the same people at parties, right? These little Fig and Blue Cheese bites are easy but very elegant, and the surprising tart and tangy with sweet combination is a real treat. - TheRunawaySpoon

TheRunawaySpoon

Food52 Review: These delicate, crumbly little thumbprints are the perfect combination of sweet and savory, as their names suggests -- they're like a great cheese plate all wrapped into one crunchy little morsel. TheRunawaySpoon's simple food processor dough yields tender, buttery coins flecked with blue cheese and black pepper. A good quality fig jam is crucial here; if you can't find it, quince or pear jam would also work well. - A&MA&M

Makes about 3 dozen

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup butter, room temperature
  • 4 ounces blue cheese, crumbled
  • Ground black pepper
  • Fig preserves, about 3 Tablespoons
  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Place the flour, butter, blue cheese and a few grinds of black pepper in the bowl of a food processor. Process until the dough just comes together and starts to form a ball.
  3. Dump the dough onto a lightly floured surface and knead a few times to pull the dough together. Roll out to 1/8 inch thick with a floured rolling pin. Cut rounds out of the dough with a floured 1-inch cutter and transfer the rounds to the parchment-lined baking sheet.
  4. Using the back or a round half-teaspoon measure or your knuckle, make an indentation in the top of each dough round. Spoon about ¼ teaspoon of fig preserves into each indentation, using your finger to push the preserves as best as possible into the indentations.
  5. Bake the savories for 10 – 14 minutes, until the preserves are bubbling and the pastry is light golden on the bottom.
  6. Let cool on the baking sheet for at least 10 minutes, the remove to a wire rack to cool.
  7. You’ll find fig preserves at the grocery – it may be shelved with the “fancy” jams and jellies. You can make these a day ahead and keep them in two layers separated by waxed paper in an airtight container.

Tags: blue cheese, Figs, savory

Comments (179) Questions (11)

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6 days ago Zaman

is there any way I can do this without a food processor?

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6 days ago Sanibelle

I am sure you can. It is just like a stiff cookie dough and they made cookies long before food processors. You might try a hand mixer if it has a strong enough motor, but lacking one just use a mixing bowl and wooden spoon and you will get a workout. Make sure the butter is fairly soft and knead a little if mixing becomes too difficult.

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16 days ago Horto

how much pepper?

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16 days ago juleeclip

Hard to guess an exact measurement when grinding the pepper, but I go very generous with it, probably ten grinds of my mill. It's a matter of taste, but I think it's an important flavor in these savouries of few and such simple ingredients.

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16 days ago Sanibelle

I agree. I like a pronounced pepper flavor and keep grinding until I can see it. I probably use about a tablespoon.

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2 months ago Stephanie

I made these for a recent dinner party and they were the most requested recipe. Everyone loved them.

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2 months ago ccg

I would like to know if anyone thinks almond meal could be substituted for the all-purpose flour? Thanks for your time.

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3 months ago yvette

Thanks! the fig butter worked great! actually the jalepeno jelly was a big hit too!

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3 months ago yvette

Could I use fig butter instead? That's all I could find at the store this morning.

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3 months ago innoabrd

This recipe is so adaptable, you can use nearly anything...that said, I prefer something with a bit of tartness to it, or even heat, like a jalapeno jelly. Give it a try with one sheet, if you're not happy with it, go get something else to try. The dough is fine left in the fridge.

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3 months ago vrunka

I've made them with fig butter and they're great! I actually prefer the texture of the butter to the jam

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3 months ago Sanibelle

I agree with Innoabrd and Vrunka. I usually use a mango jalapeno jelly because I like the heat, sweetness and color. I would try a couple with the fig butter (which you probably have already done) and if it doesn't spread too much, use it. It sounds like it will work well.

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3 months ago Tina Cowart

This recipe is from Food and Wine Magazine. I made them several months ago.

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3 months ago innoabrd

That's kind of an accusation of plagiarism. This recipe was posted, if you look above, over three years ago. When were they in Food and Wine? I searched a bit and found a similar idea, but using ready-made puff pastry, but didn't find this recipe?

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4 months ago Anne B

I am not great and pastry and these were a big fail for me. Next time I would add more flour and cut quite a bit thicker. I read all the comments and one poster said they were "friable." That seems an apt description of what happened in my case. But great flavor. Might try again.

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4 months ago c1marie

We like to make these with 3oz. of blue cheese and 1oz. of goat cheese. Instead of rolling and using a cutter, I find it easier to roll dough into balls, then using my finger I make a depression for the figs. They need to bake a few extra minutes since they're a bit thicker. Great recipe...whipped up a bunch for Christmas treat bags.

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4 months ago Pegeen

Made them for Thanksgiving. I used Stilton. They were GONE before I had a chance to come out of the kitchen and taste one myself. I rolled 1/4 inch thick and used a 1-1/2 inch cutter, so I had around 2 dozen. The bottom of a 1/4 teaspoon, wet, made a good "indenter" for the jam.

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5 months ago SPark0101

Made these tonight for the first time and think they are fantastic! A few notes: I cut 1"rounds and didn't use as much of the fig preserves as recommended, but the preserves still ran over. Next time, I'll roll the dough 1/4-inch thick and cut 1 1/2" rounds. It looks from the photos that A&M may have even used a 2" cutter.
Also, I used the blue cheese from Cowgirl Creamery and it was a little overpowering, so a milder blue might be better.
I ended up with about 70 savories.

Can't wait to make these again!

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5 months ago JJ Benkert

Last night went to a Advent by Candlelight dinner .... one of the guests brought what we all though was a plate of Christmas Cookies. Suprize when we bit into a STAR shaped Fig and Blue Savoury.. Really FUN to use various shaped cookie cutters .

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5 months ago KerhonksonGal

Good news! Decidedly less blue after baking. And DELISH.

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5 months ago KerhonksonGal

I guess it must have :) So odd I'm going to throw them in the oven now and see what happens!

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5 months ago Sanibelle

No. Did your blue cheese have a lot of blue in it? I have used blue cheese and Gorgonzola and never had a blue dough.

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5 months ago KerhonksonGal

I just put the dough together last night, and it's BLUE. Anyone else have this smurfy result?

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5 months ago susanne

yep, i used a standard multi-wire pastry cutter. cut the butter into the flour, as if for pie dough or other pastry. then cut in the gorgonzola the same way. it's very workable, just knead a few times to bring the last bits together.

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5 months ago WoooPigSooie!

Has anyone made this dough without a food processor? Any tips or tricks?

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5 months ago susanne

these are indeed easy and delicious. i used gorgonzola from costco, and added a half teaspoon of minced fresh rosemary instead of the black pepper. i also subbed a quarter cup of whole wheat flour for a quarter cup of the unbleached. i mixed the rosemary with the flours, cut in the cold butter with a wire pastry cutter, then cut in the gorgonzola. pressed into logs on plastic wrap, the dough chilled while the oven heated. i made about 70 bite-sized pastries. my husband and i like them so much, i quickly batched up most of them and delivered them to friends! only problem with this recipe: you will want to eat them all immediately.

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5 months ago juleeclip

I made these for a birthday party recently (cookie cutter method). They were so incredibly easy to bake earlier in the day. After I tasted the first batch, I immediately made a second batch... these will be a staple at the holidays!