Chicken Stock

By • January 31, 2011 16 Comments

45 + Save

If you like it, save it!

Save and organize all of the stuff you love in one place.

Got it!

If you like something…

Click the heart, it's called favoriting. Favorite the stuff you like.

Got it!

Author Notes: While making some homemade chicken stock out of leftover roast chicken bones and onion and celery scraps, I decided to throw in a few cardamom pods. This is the best chicken stock I've ever made because of those flavor packed green pods! The cardamom brings a fragrant lemony surprise to an otherwise ordinary kitchen staple. Use this as a base for a toe-tingling vegetable soup, just add your favorite vegetables and season with salt and pepper to your taste. - midnitechefmidnitechef

Food52 Review: Chicken stock always perfumes the whole house but the cardamom in this recipe added some spice to the mix. I used a whole chicken since I didn't have any roast chicken remains and added 2 shallots and 3 slices of ginger in lieu of the vegetables and garlic. The finished product also has a mildly sweet spicy taste and I'm looking forward to making vegetable congee with it tomorrow.luvcookbooks

Makes 1 batch of stock

  • 1 - 2 whole chickens, roasted, bones reserved
  • 3 cups bits of onion, celery, carrot, and garlic
  • 1 tablespoon green cardamom pods
  • 1 tablespoon whole peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • water
  1. In a large pot, place the chicken bones, leftover vegetable pieces (these would be the ends of vegetables, save them in a plastic bag in the freezer until you accumulate enough for stock or soup), cardamom pods, salt and pepper. Cover with cold water.
  2. Bring the pot to a boil for 10 minutes. Reduce to a simmer and cover.
  3. Let the marrow flavor the broth. Be careful not to add too much salt as the water will evaporate and concentrate the salt in the stock. Simmer until the water as reduced by about 1/3 and is opaque from taking on all those flavors.
  4. Strain the stock to remove the bones, peppercorns, and cardamom pods. Return the stock to the pot. Taste for salt levels and adjust while simmering the strained stock.
  5. Remove the stock from the heat and let it cool. Divide into containers and freeze for up to 6 months. ( Hint: measure the stock into 1 or 2 cup portions and label accordingly. Freeze some of the stock in an ice cube tray then transfer to a plastic freezer bag for easy access.)

More Great Recipes: Chicken|Condiments|Soups

💬 View Comments ()