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Nancy Harmon Jenkins

Nancy is a food writer, historian, and author of many books, her most recent being Virgin Territory: Exploring the World of Olive Oil, forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin.

added almost 3 years ago

Josie, I wouldn't worry too much about marjoram, fresh or dried. It gets a little lost with the horseradish in any case. If you want to substitute another herb, why not thyme, fresh or dried, to offset the pungent horseradish flavor. In general, it's a good idea not to feel put in a box by recipes. They're meant on the whole to be suggestions rather than formulas--the more you cook, the more you'll discover that there are no hard and fast rules, except perhaps for pastry.

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Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added almost 3 years ago

As Nancy explains, yes, you can substitute dried herbs for fresh. The rule of thumb I know is to use 1 part dried herbs in exchange for 3 parts fresh herbs. Checking first that the dried herbs aren't old and still have good aroma and flavor when you pinch, smell and taste them.

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pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 3 years ago

Oregano is a close relative of marjoram and it's one of the few herbs that tastes better dried rather than fresh.