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A question about a recipe: Nonno Corrado's Everyday Tuscan Bread

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I have a question about the recipe "Nonno Corrado's Everyday Tuscan Bread" from Francesca Andreani. Can you give a little more information about how to shape the loaves? I'm not clear on the process.

asked by Jill Baily 10 months ago
4 answers 565 views
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amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added 10 months ago

Perfect timing - I have a batch rising right now (bread baking is a great distraction from work!) and was just wondering the same thing. Rolling a dough snake onto itself would seem to form a coil, not a crosissant shape- which I as sum means wide in center, narrow at ends.

1097a5b5 1775 4eec a8ea 7421137b65dc  image 2 apples claire sullivan 2
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added 10 months ago

That should read: ...which I assume means... So many years in, still no edit button!

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cv
added 10 months ago

Croissants are made from flat triangular pieces of dough, not "snakes."

This is a good example of how a photo or two would be much more helpful and illustrative than text instructions.

1097a5b5 1775 4eec a8ea 7421137b65dc  image 2 apples claire sullivan 2
amysarah

amysarah is a trusted home cook.

added 10 months ago

Out of oven - haven't tasted yet, but it looks and smells wonderful. Two small loaves. Also in terms of forming it - it did look more or less like a (stubby) croissant after coiling the dough.