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A question about a recipe: Sicilian Blood Orange Marmalade

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I have a question about the recipe "Sicilian Blood Orange Marmalade" from dymnyno. Can I use the technique of cutting out the pith and skip the 4 day soak? I usually keep the seeds in cheese cloth to soak/cook with everything to keep the pectin? I like this ratio and it sounds delicious!

asked by meet your baker over 2 years ago

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4 answers 565 views
MrsWheelbarrow
MrsWheelbarrow

Cathy is a food preserving expert and author of Mrs. Wheelbarrow's Practical Pantry: Recipes and Techniques for Year-Round Preserving.

added over 2 years ago

There are many methods to making marmalade. I've had a long battle with marmalade myself and finally determined a technique that works for me. It sounds like you have done the same. And Dymnyno has her own ratio and technique. I would suggest making it Dymnyno's way once and then making adjustments as you see fit. Otherwise, it's hard to evaluate the flavor, slump and color.

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ChefJune
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

I love this recipe just the way it is. I don't know how your method would work, but this recipe is a keeper.

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Diana B
Diana B

Diana B is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

I've never seen a recipe quite like that, so it's hard to advise you on whether an alteration in technique might work. I would also be concerned that changing the water as much as that recipe calls for makes you lose out on a lot of the natural pectin in the fruit.

The marmalade method I swear by (from Madelaine Bullwinkel's book, Gourmet Preserves Chez Madelaine) calls for chopping the fruit and slicing the peel to your preferred width, then covering with an equal volume of water. You can save the seeds to boil with the jam, if you wish, but it's not necessary. You leave this to sit overnight, then the next day bring it to a boil, simmer for 15 minutes, cover, and again leave overnight. You extract a great deal of pectin this way.

On the third day, you bring the mixture to a boil, add the sugar and boil until the marmalade reaches the set point, 8 degrees above boiling (220F). I have never had this recipe fail me; you still have a three-day process, but you are also guaranteed a good set because of all the pectin you've extracted from the peel. You might shorten the process by prepping the fruit and peel in the morning, then simmering the mixture at night, and making the marmalade the next morning. I should think you'd still get enough pectin from the peels that way.

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MrsWheelbarrow
MrsWheelbarrow

Cathy is a food preserving expert and author of Mrs. Wheelbarrow's Practical Pantry: Recipes and Techniques for Year-Round Preserving.

added over 2 years ago

Diana makes a great point about the pectin. The other benefit to the three day process is how the sugar syrup infuses the peel. The resulting marmalade is more like candied peel in gel than bitter peel in gel. This is my preferred method, too.

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