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A question about a recipe: Currant Rosemary Scones

91bc6396 ef1f 4966 975f b1c015b975f8  30 currant rosemary scones

I have a question about the recipe "Currant Rosemary Scones" from Ovenly. I was thinking of subbing some whole wheat flour for part of the white flour. Has anyone tried this? Thanks!

asked by Kaja1105 about 1 year ago

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10 answers 751 views
AntoniaJames
AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 1 year ago

I can't imagine why you couldn't. I do it all the time. It will no doubt make them taste better! ;o)

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Kaja1105
added about 1 year ago

Thank you!

Windischgirl
added about 1 year ago

Go ahead! You may want to add a bit more cream--depending on the amount of the sub--as whole wheat absorbs more moisture than AP flour. Let the dough sit for 5 minutes before shaping and baking to let the whole wheat hydrate and to prevent a dry scone...you can always add a bit more cream at that point if needed. The dough should be soft and more to the wet than the dry side.

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Kaja1105
added about 1 year ago

Great advice, thanks!

PieceOfLayerCake
PieceOfLayerCake

PieceofLayerCake is a trusted source on baking.

added about 1 year ago

One rule I heard somewhere that I frequently follow is, if I want to add a bit of non-white flour/meal to a cake, scone, muffin, biscuit, cookie, etc. recipe, I just sib ¼ of the flour, by weight for the alternative grain. It's always worked for me. Any more and you alter the final flavor/texture of the product. That might result in a better scone, but there's only one way to find out. Play around with it, the worst case scenario is that you learn something.

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Kaja1105
added about 1 year ago

Thanks!

dinner at ten
dinner at ten

dinner at ten is a trusted home cook.

added about 1 year ago

I commonly substitute 1/3 white flour with whole wheat pastry flour (make sure it's specifically pastry flour, not unspecified or bread) in scones, cookies, pancakes, etc with no issues with texture or changes needed in the recipe, and I particularly like the flavor in scones. I actually would advise against letting it rest, since it's best for the butter to stay cold. I think the extra moisture absorbing properties are much more dramatic with bread flour and in the case of scones you're not really hydrating the white flour first either.

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Kaja1105
added about 1 year ago

I agree about not letting it rest--you do want those chunks of butter to stay solid. Thank you!

shecans
added about 1 year ago

I routinely add a third of the flour as whole wheat white in anything I bake.

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Kaja1105
added about 1 year ago

Thanks!