City Dirt

City Dirt Extras: Fig Propagation

By • June 20, 2012 • 5 Comments

You asked and we answered! After our City Dirt column on plant propagation, a few of you wanted to know more about propagating figs. Here's more from our garden specialist Amy Pennington:

I think you'll be surprised at how simple this is, but for anyone interested, here are the instructions if you want to DIY it:

  1. Find a fig tree! Maybe your neighbor has one or maybe you're in a local park.
  2. Using pruning shears, cut a 4- to 10-inch long piece of soft wood new growth, just above a plant node.
  3. Fill a large pot with potting soil (a simple plastic pot that shrubs come in is perfect) and stick the fig cutting in, cut side down. Don't worry about stripping the bark, spacing or anything. You just need to place the cutting in a well-drained medium with space to grow.
  4. Water, water, water! Moisture is key. Eventually, your cutting will grow smaller little leaves and develop a root system. You know it is ready for replanting or repotting when you give the plant a slight tug and it resists.

For more on propagation of other plants, read the full City Dirt post!

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Tags: city dirt, garden, seeds, plants, container gardening, gardening, urban gardening, fig tree, figs

Comments (5)

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Packing_up

about 2 years ago Amy Pennington

Awesome idea, truly! You'll have to nurse them from now until December, but I love, love, love this idea! If you're in Seattle - make one for me! Enjoy.

Mrs._larkin_370

about 2 years ago mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

GREAT tips! Now if I could only cut my neighbors' trees down and get some sunshine in my yard.......

Smokin_tokyo

about 2 years ago BoulderGalinTokyo

Very easy to prop the figs-and rewarding. As to the line 'water, water, water'-- the number one surprise I had on the drive from Rome to the airport was how dry the countryside of Italy was--it looked a lot more like Colorado than Japan. Watering once a day should be enough.

Packing_up

about 2 years ago Amy Pennington

I should have clarified and thanks for pointing it out. Mature trees don't need a ton of water, as you noted, but when you FIRST have a cutting, it is imperative that the soil stay just-moist until the cutting puts on growth and roots. Once they're repotted, you're in better shape. Thanks for your thoughts!

036

about 2 years ago aargersi

Abbie is a trusted source on General Cooking.

I am doing this STAT! My mother in law has a strawberry fig tree that I absolutely love and need for my own. In fact I may grow several - that would be a great Christmas gift for all of her children (there are SIX) right?