Small Batch

No-Knead Sandwich Bread

By • September 17, 2013 • 71 Comments

472 Save

If you like it, save it!

Save and organize all of the stuff you love in one place.

Got it!

If you like something…

Click the heart, it's called favoriting. Favorite the stuff you like.

Got it!

It's always more fun to DIY. Every week, we'll spare you a trip to the grocery store and show you how to make small batches of great foods at home.

Today: Carey Nershi from Reclaiming Provincial shares a recipe for no-knead sandwich bread that takes minimal prep time and makes enough to keep extra dough on hand. Your lunch just got an upgrade.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread from Food52

Learning how to make bread from scratch is an empowering thing. For me, the ability to transform a seemingly unimpressive list of ingredients into a real, honest-to-goodness loaf of something feels like a revelatory act. Especially since dough holds so many possibilities. The options are endless, and I am a big fan of endless options. 

I have learned that some of the best loaves are the simple, all-purpose ones. I resisted the no-knead revolution for a long time because, well, I liked kneading. But my curiosity eventually got the better of me, and I gave it a try. I was an instant convert. Not only is it easier, but the taste is fantastic.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread from Food52

As my days grew busier and busier, this recipe's minimal hands-on time became ideal. Mixing all my ingredients up in one bowl, letting them hang out and get friendly for an afternoon, then sticking the bowl in the fridge until I’m ready to bake something? Yeah, I’m into that. Saving time by making a double batch? Now we’re talking. If you’re in the habit of making lots of sandwiches (say, for hungry little ones heading off to school!), having a mound of dough at the ready in your fridge can be a lifesaver. 

More: Once you make your first loaf, pack up a PB&J with homemade Concord Grape Jelly.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread from Food52

This recipe is a bit of a meeting-in-the-middle between the Artisan Bread in 5 and Jim Lahey techniques. The flavor of Lahey’s recipe is amazing, but a 12- to 18-hour proofing followed by a 2-hour rise might seem like a daunting amount of waiting time for some. The original Artisan Bread in 5 recipe calls for a fair amount of yeast, which gives the finished loaf a very distinct yeasty flavor. This recipe cuts the yeast in half and compensates by extending the proofing and rise times slightly, allowing more natural flavors to develop without adding a good deal of time to the process. Once the proofing is complete, stick the dough in the fridge for up to two weeks and use it as you need it. (Bonus: the flavor improves over time from the cold fermentation.)

No-knead doughs are usually shaped into round, rustic loaves, but they can easily be turned into fantastic sandwich bread. A teensy bit of kneading and shaping yields a tighter crumb that slices wonderfully, but still begs to be eaten with just a little butter and sea salt -- it’s that good.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread

Makes 2 loaves

3 1/4 cups bread flour (433 grams)
3 1/4 cups all-purpose flour (433 grams)
2 teaspoons instant yeast (4 grams)
1 1/2 tablespoons kosher salt (14 grams)
3 cups of water

No-Knead Sandwich Bread on Food52

Combine flours, yeast, and salt in a large bowl. Add water and stir together with a wooden spoon to form a shaggy dough.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread on Food52

Cover with plastic wrap or a tea towel and let proof at room temperature for around 5 hours. At this point the dough can be used immediately, or covered with plastic wrap and kept in the fridge for up to two weeks.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread on Food52

On baking day, remove half of the dough from the bowl and return the remainder to the fridge. Turn the dough out on a floured surface and lightly knead 3 to 4 times.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread on Food52

Shape dough into a rectangle, approximately 8 by 12 inches.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread on Food52  No-Knead Sandwich Bread on Food52

Fold a third of the dough into the center, followed by the other third.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread from Food52

Place dough seam side-down in a buttered loaf pan.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread from Food52

Cover and let rise for around 1 hour, or until the dough has doubled in size. 

Preheat your oven to 450° F. Dust the top of the dough with a little flour and score with a serrated knife.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread from Food52

Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the top of the loaf has just begun to brown. Let cool for at least an hour before slicing.

No-Knead Sandwich Bread from Food52

See the full recipe (and save and print it) here.

Photos by Carey Nershi.

Jump to Comments (71)

Tags: small batch, bread, no-knead, easy, sandwich, how-to & diy

Comments (71)

Default-small
Default-small
Img_4935

about 1 month ago Akiko

Great recipe! I'm happy to have fresh toast bread in a weekday. We ate almost half for our breakfast going back to kitchen and slicing the bread again and again ... ;)

Hit

11 months ago How's it Taste?

This is without a doubt the best white bread I've ever tried!

Default-small

12 months ago Kelsey

I made this bread last night, and the crust is delectable! The bread itself tastes gummy; I don't know whether to attribute this to it not being cooked through or me not being used to eating white bread. I did cook it with a pan underneath the loaf pan and with a bowl of water in the oven. I would love advice on making it less gummy--even if that's just increasing baking time.

6316848929_fba0cd3703_o

12 months ago the totally not-foolish pucko

No knead dough is wet enough as it is, just ditch the extra water. Let it rise in the pan (make sure it's made out of the heaviest gauge metal you can find) until it's at least doubled. Stick it in a pre-heated 500º oven and let oven spring do it's magic, take a peek at it after about 15 minutes, if it's looking good and growing a bit turn the heat down to 450º and let it go another half hour..

Default-small

12 months ago GregoryBPortland

Keep making bread. It's one of the most satisfying things you can do in the kitchen.

Default-small

12 months ago tanvir

Thank, this is an amazing recipe specially this is my first bread ever. I am so proud of it and smiling away since I made it two weeks ago.

Default-small

12 months ago GregoryBPortland

Freeze the other loaf. I know this sounds silly, but the recipe was conceived for two loaves and cutting it in half didn't work. If properly frozen and then thawed when you need it, the loaf will be nearly as good and at the very least will make spectacular toast.

Alice

12 months ago Alice Gardner

I tried this recently. The only change I began with was to cut the recipe in half(I won't use 2 loaves in 2 weeks) and after the first rise it was WAAAY too wet and sticky. I couldn't get the dough to hold its shape. I wound up working in at least a cup of extra flour and letting it rest for a day. I formed it and baked it alright yesterday, and while it was still delicious, it is too dense for sandwich making. Any suggestions? I used AP flour and Pillsbury Bread flour.

Default-small

about 1 year ago TrishR

I made this over the weekend and it came out truly perfect. So simple, and so delicious. I'm sharing the recipe right and left, because with something this easy and great, we should all have homemade bread during the week! Thank you!

Stringio

about 1 year ago jana.swenson.73

Is 1 1/2 TBS of salt correct? When I weigh it out, it weighs 29-30 gram, so do you mean 1 1/2 tsp?

Img_8936r

about 1 year ago Carey Nershi

Hmmmmmm, it should definitely be 1 1/2 tablespoons, and now I've basically gone down an internet rabbit hole reading about the different weights of kosher salt (depending on how they're made and the resulting density). Apparently they can vary quite a bit! And the origin of the type I'm using is a mystery to me since I buy it from a bulk bin at the store. I looked around to see if I could turn up a kosher salt weight from other ABin5 no-knead posts, but didn't have any luck. In this case, I would suggest going with your 1 1/2 tbsp, even if it's pushing 30 grams. (One of the criticisms I've read of the no-knead bread recipes is that they could use more salt, so I don't think it will hurt.)

Rose_hi-res_photo

about 1 year ago Rose Levy Beranbaum

bread just out of oven. looks perfect. is there a way of sending a photo?

Img_8936r

about 1 year ago Carey Nershi

Oooo! If you're on instagram, you can find me @careynotcarrie. Otherwise you can email me a shot: carey@reclaimingprovincial.... I'd love to see! :)

Open-uri20130530-14939-qaknqp

about 1 year ago LauriL

Nice pics! For a moment I thought they were Eric Moran's who does some free-lancing on What To Eat Now column. See Bagel making!

Img_8936r

about 1 year ago Carey Nershi

Thank you! I love Eric's style, so I take that as a big compliment. :)

Default-small

about 1 year ago Kim116

I read the comments about active dry vs instant yeast but does anyone have experience using fresh yeast for these long proofing recipes?

6316848929_fba0cd3703_o

about 1 year ago the totally not-foolish pucko

I played a bit with it (my mom used to use it). A little goes a long way, according to the Red Star website, you should be able to get 4 loaves out of one cake. Just be aware that it is perishable- and when it goes off it really stinks. http://www.redstaryeast...

Bw_o

4 months ago Sini | My Blue&White Kitchen

I almost always substitute dry yeast with fresh yeast as it's very easy to come by where I live and I think that it gives you the best rising results. You need more fresh yeast than dry one: if using fresh yeast, use three times the amount of dry yeast the recipe calls for.

Default-small

about 1 year ago Jill Murray

Can someone help me divide this dough to make a single loaf of bread? I'm using some rather expensive heritage AP flour ($10 for 2 lbs) and I don't want to waste it and have my bread turn our horrible. I tried a similar method/recipe by dividing a recipe in half because I didn't want to waste flour and that's exactly what I did. It didn't turn out like I wanted. I was still able to use the bread for toast, but it was pretty dense. I'm not a baker and assume that dividing the recipe isn't quite linear. Is it based on ratios? Also, can I just use AP flour and omit the bread flour? Any tips are appreciated.

Img_8936r

about 1 year ago Carey Nershi

I usually split this recipe right down the middle to make a single loaf without issue. (So that would be: 433 grams of flour; 355 grams of water; 4 grams of instant yeast; 7 grams of salt.) Another reader noted that if you do want to use 100% AP flour, you will want to add a little less water or a little more flour, as the lower protein count of AP flour could make the dough a bit sticky as is. I hope this helps!

Default-small

about 1 year ago ginam

If I didn't want it to sit in the fridge till I was ready to bake, would it still work as well? Thanks for this great recipe and idea!

Img_8936r

about 1 year ago Carey Nershi

Yup! You can totally bake a loaf right away. The bread does develop wonderful flavor after it's had some cold fermentation time in the fridge, but a loaf baked immediately will still be absolutely delish. :)

Default-small

about 1 year ago GregoryBPortland

The original recipe for Jim Lahey's No-Knead bread recipe called for a little more than three cups of unbleached flour. I decided to experiment with the ratio of regular flour after enjoying Lahey's excellent recipe and found that adding 1/2-cup of whole wheat, while reducing 1/2-cup unbleached flour did not affect the texture of this wonderful bread. It added flavor as well. I'll try this with Ms. Nershi's fine looking recipe but only after I have mastered her version first. BTW, you can substitute your own preference amount of whole wheat flour to the bread recipe, but keep in mind, the loaf twill have a correspondingly wheatier flavor and the loaf will be heavier. My suggestion would be to start with 1/2 cup and,if you like, add by 1/4-cup increments.

Default-small

about 1 year ago Kris

How does this turn out if you use whole wheat (or mostly whole wheat) flour?

Img_8936r

about 1 year ago Carey Nershi

I've gone up to half whole wheat, half white flour, and I wouldn't really recommend increasing the whole wheat flour beyond that, as I imagine it'd yield a rather dense bread. If you do give it a go, you'll want to increase the first and second rise time by quite a bit (perhaps by around 50%).

Default-small

about 1 year ago tanvir

Des this freeze well?

Img_8936r

about 1 year ago Carey Nershi

I haven't tried to freeze either the dough or the bread, so I'm not quite sure myself. I've seen people talk about freezing Lahey's no-knead pizza dough, but pizza and bread are two different beasts. If you do give it a try, let me know how it works out.

L1020855

about 1 year ago CHeeb

Tanvir,we make five loaves a week for church ,wrap them in foil after baking,and then seal them in gallon zip lock bags.Granted they don't stay around long, but even still warm from the oven, they freeze beautifully.

Default-small

about 1 year ago sherrilb

Do you have any hints about high altitude (6600 ft.)baking?

Img_8936r

about 1 year ago Carey Nershi

I don't have much experience with high altitude baking myself (we're only a couple hundred feet above sea level in Burlington, VT!), but KAF has a great little guide to adjustments you should make: http://www.kingarthurflour...

Rose_hi-res_photo

about 1 year ago Rose Levy Beranbaum

Better for bread gold medal flour is about equal in protein to King Arthur bread and unbleached all purpose combination.

Rose_hi-res_photo

about 1 year ago Rose Levy Beranbaum

What kind of flours are you using? The total protein content will determine the amount of water needed.