Merguez and Sweet Potato Hash

By • April 12, 2011 • 11 Comments


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Author Notes: Weeks ago, I bought some fantastic-looking merguez sausage meat at the farmers' market. (In the winter, when the vegetable stands hold little more than a few sad looking potatoes, I tend to buy a lot of meat and eggs.) Unsure of what I wanted to do with it, I put it in the freezer and promptly forgot about it. Last week, while cleaning out the freezer, I came upon the merguez and moved it to the fridge, determined to make use of it. A couple days later, after taking stock of the rest of the contents of the refrigerator and finding a few sweet potatoes, an onion and some rosemary, it came to me: I'd rustle up a new kind of hash.Merrill Stubbs

Serves 4

  • Olive oil
  • 1 pound lamb merguez, casings removed
  • 1 medium yellow onion, finely diced
  • 2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch cubes
  • Salt
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh rosemary
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  1. Put a tablespoon of oil in a heavy pan (I used cast iron) and set over medium-high heat. When the oils starts to shimmer, add the merguez and break it up with a wooden spoon. Sauté, stirring occasionally, until the merguez is evenly browned, about 5 minutes.
  2. Remove the meat with a slotted spoon and set it aside in a bowl. Add enough oil to the pan so that you have about 3 tablespoons of fat. Add the onion and sweet potato to the pan, along with a pinch of salt. Fry the onions and potatoes, turning gently every once in a while but not too often (you don't want to break up the potatoes once they start to soften).
  3. Once the onion and sweet potato are softened and richly caramelized -- 6 to 8 minutes -- add the rosemary and a few grinds of pepper, stir through gently and cook for another minute or two. Fold in the merguez, and cook for another minute or so to heat through. Serve immediately, topped with an egg or a dollop of sour cream or creme fraiche.

Comments (11) Questions (0)

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about 1 year ago Vinsmom

Made this for an Easter weekend brunch. We all thought it was really delicious. I wish that the sweet potato quantity was shown in ounces or cups. Hard to judge, though the exact amount isn't crucial. I served it with a poached egg for my husband and the other guest and I had it plain. Rosemary was key.

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about 1 year ago Zoom

This was amazing. I left out the rosemary (didn't feel like a trip to the grocery store), but the flavors were wonderful. A poached egg really brought it all together.

Merrill

about 1 year ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

So glad you liked it!

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almost 3 years ago kss

This was my inspiration for tonight's dinner. I started the onions cooking while my sweet pots boiled till partly cooked. After they cooled a bit, I cut the sweet pots lengthwise into planks. I used the two-burner grill pan to grill the planks and 6 links (300g) of turkey merguez while the onion caramelized. When the pots were done, I cut the planks in half at the "waist". Then I cut the merguez links into three chunks each, 1.5-2" long, about the same as the half-planks of sweet potatoes (which were on the small side to start with). Tossed all these together with the onion and rosemary. It wasn't hash, I guess, since the bits were too big, but it was quite tasty anyhow. Thanks!

Here-she-comes-to-save-the-day-or-the-day-after-tomorrow

almost 3 years ago Nat Pepper

Delicous and comforting! I made it last night and I think I will add this to my list of go-to recipes for quick and tasty meals. Thanks!

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almost 3 years ago SylviaS

Delicious and fast. Perfect for a chilly afternoon. Eating it as I type! :)

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almost 3 years ago rlsalvati

Delicious. I used lamb brats from our csa and we topped it with homemade low fat Greek yogurt. Any sausage would do, but I liked the lamb/sweet potatoes combination.

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almost 3 years ago MegMcNichol

2 questions: is lamb sausage essential or will others do? Would'nt a dollop of thick greek yogurt (the 0% fat kind) work well? Lush but not as heavy?

Merrill

almost 3 years ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

Sure, you can use another kind of sausage or ground meat. Nonfat Greek yogurt would be a fine substitute for those concerned about calories/fat, although creme fraiche or sour cream will taste better!

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about 3 years ago susan g

This sounds so good I will cheat with veg sausage -- a good spicy one.

Steve_dunn02

about 3 years ago Oui, Chef

I am SO making this as soon as I can find some good merguez. Fabulous! - S