Creamy Homemade Ricotta

By • April 22, 2011 • 106 Comments



Author Notes: My friend Maggy, of Three Many Cooks, recently dubbed me the Queen of Ricotta. She's definitely onto something. Since first blogging the recipe a year and a half ago, it has been made in kitchens from coast to coast, and as far away as New Zealand.

I put up a pot at least once a week, and find many uses for it daily, from a simple bruschetta, drizzled with truffle honey, a dollop in steel cut oats and even a smear on pizza, speckled with bits of smoky bacon and roasted onions.

Rather than leave my mark with just one recipe for one meal, I'd like to know I'm part of my friends' and family's everyday eating habits when I can no longer cook for them myself. - Jennifer Perillo
Jennifer Perillo

Food52 Review: WHO: Jennifer Perillo. Known to friends as "Queen of Ricotta". Her Majesty of Dairy writes about life and food at http://www.injennieskitchen.com/
WHAT: Milky and luscious homemade ricotta
HOW: Buttermilk, whole milk and heavy cream. A pinch of salt. Wait. Strain.
WHY WE LOVE IT: This recipe makes the entire kitchen seem conquerable. With just one stir of the pot, and a few minutes of wait time you have actually made cheese! After the initial swell of pride fades, you're left with a good amount of one of the most versatile of refrigerator staples -- spread it on toast for breakfast, stir it into pasta at lunch, or enjoy it as its original Community Pick recipe-tester theediblecomplex does, spoonful by spoonful.
Food52

Makes 2 cups

  • 4 cups whole milk
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 3/4 cups buttermilk
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  1. Add the ingredients to a 4-quart pot. Bring to a very gentle boil over medium heat. Meanwhile, line a sieve or fine mesh strainer with a few layers of cheesecloth and place it over a deep bowl or pot.
  2. Once the curds begin to separate from the whey (you'll see little specks of white bob to the surface), stir gently and set heat to the lowest setting (see NOTE). Cook for 2 more minutes, then remove pot from heat and set on an unlit back burner for at least 30 minutes, and up to one hour. (this will help the curds further develop).
  3. Gently ladle the curds into the cheesecloth-lined strainer (this helps produce a fluffier, creamier curd, than pouring it into the strainer). When all the curds have been spooned into the bowl, pull the cheesecloth up the sides to loosely cover the ricotta in the strainer. Let sit for 10 minutes to drain (this will yield a very moist ricotta. If using for a cake recipe, you may want to let it drain longer for a drier consistency).
  4. Store in a tightly covered container in the refrigerator for up to three days.
  5. NOTE: After making one to two pots of ricotta for a year, I've learned it likes to be left alone to produce the highest yield, so resist the temptation to stir it frequently once the curds begin to separate from the whey. One stir is enough, and if you're curious, you can dip the spoon in the pot once or twice to see how the curds are developing.
Jump to Comments (106)

Comments (106) Questions (18)

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8 days ago skenny89

Perfect Recipe, I always use this one when I make the famous ricotta gnocchi on this site

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2 months ago sususkitchen

Well, being Michelin de faux, I give this 5 spoons! I found this last Saturday and I'm on my 4th small "batch". Try a little layer of lemon curd in a shot glass, ricotta, strawberries or blueberries, repeat......................

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4 months ago Gourmel

Please help! I tried this for the second time and again got hardly any ricotta and big pot of milk/cream. I followed the directions and after coming away with less than a tablespoon of ricotta, I reheated and started from scratch, letting it boil well after it "tented" and puffed up (a good 20 minutes or so longer) and still ended up with maybe 1/8 cup. I'm using Trader Joes whole milk and heavy whipping cream. Can someone please tell me what I'm doing wrong?

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4 months ago Judith Roud

What sort of buttermilk are you using? Does it say "cultured"? And is that milk from TJ's ultra pasteurized? Or just pasteurized. You don't want to use ultra pasteurized milk or cream.

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4 months ago Gourmel

It's just pasteurized (not ultra) and for the buttermilk I mixed ¾ cup milk with ¾ tbs lemon juice and let it sit for 30 min before starting.

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4 months ago Judith Roud

Melanie, there's your problem. There isn't enough acid in the "substitute" buttermilk you are using. Either go get real buttermilk, or use fresh, plain yogurt. Or do a web search for a recipe that uses just lemon juice or vinegar to coagulate the curds. Your substitute will work for baking, but not for this. Plus buttermilk or yogurt adds a layer of flavor you don't get when you make ricotta with just an acid like lemon or vinegar. Hope this helps.

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4 months ago Gourmel

Ah ok! I had read that you can use a 1 cup : 1 tbs ratio since I don't usually have buttermilk on hand but I'll pick some up and try again. Thank you so much for your help!

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3 months ago Judith Roud

If you don't use the whole quart of buttermilk right away, you can freeze it in half-cup portions to use in baked goods. I don't think the buttermilk, once frozen will do a good job on a subsequent batch of ricotta, though. Remember good, fresh plain yogurt works fine, too. Good luck!

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3 months ago Gourmel

Not sure if supermarket yogurt qualifies as "fresh" so I'll probably give the buttermilk a try. Thanks for the tip about freezing and all of your help!

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4 months ago natjanewoo

I have made this ricotta over a dozen times now, and every time it is perfect. A question: Would it be alright to use a lid, in order to speed up that first initial heating? We are making lots of it, and on our electric stovetop it takes an hour or more for the curds to bob to the surface. Thank you so much.

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6 months ago Judith Roud

Just made this again, and since I didn't have any buttermilk, I used 3/4 cup of plain yogurt. Worked fine, and plain organic yogurt doesn't have all the additives that most commercial buttermilk products have, even the organic ones.

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4 months ago cucina di mammina

I like this idea! thanks for sharing as I do not like buttermilk for the fat content and preservatives either. Great idea.

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7 months ago sbw57

After hesitating on making this I finally did & I don't know what I was dreading. It came out just fine even though the milk burned a little on the bottom. Can't wait to use it in lasagna.

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8 months ago vlucky

I forgot to mention that I used 2% milk and low-fat Half & Half instead of cream. The result was delicious. When making a double batch be sure to leave the flame rather low or the milk will burn on the bottom before it boils.

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8 months ago vlucky

Love this! I agree with all the positive comments about the ricotta and the whey. I used the whey for making jasmine rice in the rice cooker and the result was phenomenal. If you make as double batch, be sure to let it pillow as was already advised in previous comments.

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8 months ago KOKelley

Love this method and make it quite often...it is so easy and delicious. I like to make a big batch and work my weekly dinners around it.

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15 days ago sususkitchen

Yes, but how big is your weekly batch? Mine never makes it to dinner, if not, its maxed out @24 hours.

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9 months ago underthebluegumtree

My first time ever making ricotta and it has turned out perfectly. Despite only having thin cream I got a nice yield (probably slightly more than 2 cups). I used a new linen napkin instead of cheesecloth and left to drain for 1 hour. It tastes so good that I was scraping the napkin with a spoon to savour every last bit!

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12 months ago cucina di mammina

I find your recipe very interesting as our famiglia's traditional recipe for homemade ricotta is made only with the freshest organic whole cow's milk ( I much prefer the flavor of fresh milk from my family's farm in Sora, Italia as it tastes of grass and fresh air.)

I will try your unique version soon as I am curious to see what the heavy cream and buttermilk add to both the flavor and texture of the final product.

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4 months ago Uriah

Why not post your famiglia's oh so traditional recipe in light of this oh so interesting and unique version? Regale us with the secrets of old Italia.

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4 months ago cucina di mammina

It is has posted here on Food52 under my recipe file. You will find it thereof you'd like to try it for yourself. I always try to find the freshest milk possible at a local farm in my area for best results. Thanks for your interest.

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4 months ago Uriah

Is the recipe within another? I can't find any recipe that's simply ricotta on your profile.

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4 months ago cucina di mammina

Yes Uriah, it's listed with my heirloom tomato Bruschetta recipe. The recipe in my file is from Extra Virgin as this is exactly how my grandmother and mother made ricotta in Italy but they had no written recipe or exact measures for me to share.

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about 1 year ago plato

This is almost how you make the home made cottage cheesein India, the one that is called PANEER (the one used in saag paneer). Just bring the milk to a boil (any fat content you choose, I prefer whole milk). Bring it to a boil, add the buttermilk (or lemon juice, or even white vinegar will work). As soon as you see the soilds separate & kind of clear liquid, turn the heat off & strain through a cheese cloth. You can use the cottage cheese to make a sort of scrambled curry at this point, or use it to make cutlets or filling for any of the multitdes of Indian (or even veg version of the western)pastries, or, weigh it down for 30-40 min, & then cut it into cubes & use it as it is or fried, to make palak paneer or matar (green peas) & paneer or the various paneer recipes from the Indian cuisine. The whey, I usually use it to knead the dough for chapatis, or as liquid for the various gravies & lentils that I make from the scratch.

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about 1 year ago dymnyno

You are right. Ricotta is made from why, not whole milk. This "ricotta" whatever it is called or who claims to have invented the recipe is delicious!

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about 1 year ago GreenSageCaters

Cream-line milk is the way to go. They have this at Whole foods and some local grocer markets. Although straight up from the cow raw milk is always the best (just make sure you aren't selling your cheese).

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over 1 year ago LCCCC

Organic milk doesn't work well when making cheese. It has that long shelf life because it gets some sort of Parmalot treatment. Try using just regular old non-organic milk for a higher yield.

Don't toss that whey, either. Use it as all or part of your liquid next time you make bread or rice.

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over 1 year ago natjanewoo

Thank you for the tip! The second time around I used non-organic milk and received double the yield.

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over 1 year ago LCCCC

You're very welcome. Bummer to realize that expensive organic milk is ultra-pasteurized.

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about 1 year ago Chocolate Be

Not all organic milk is ultra-pasteurized; some is and some isn't. You have to read the label. For example, Organic Valley brand makes both ultra-pasteurized and just regular pasteurized. Some stores carry both types, some just the ultra-pasteurized. Whole Foods stores usually have some of both. It's on the label on the front of the carton.

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almost 2 years ago LoCooks

Hi! I made this recipe over the weekend, and read all of the comments to pick up any tricks/nuances to make sure it worked. I waited for it to pillow up like a tent, let it wait for an hour before straining, and ladled rather than poured...The results were delicious, but the yield was only 3/4 of a cup in total...did anyone else have this experience? Where might I have gone wrong?

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over 2 years ago gothamista

This is such a terrific recipe. I tried a number of ricotta recipes before and this one beats them all. I keep making it because it's delicious and then partly eating it with a spoon and then having to find other recipes to use it in! But, there are worse things to have to do.

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over 2 years ago Bertha1tx

I make my own buttermilk for this great recipe. To make buttermilk take 1 cup of milk and mix in 1 TBSP white vinegar or lemon juice. Let sit for a few minutes and voila, buttermilk. Thanks for the great ricotta recipe. I use the whey to wash my face at night and love the feeling of massaging it into my face.

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over 2 years ago darksideofthespoon

Making this right now for gnocchi. Very excited to see how it turns out!!

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over 2 years ago rederin

This turned out wonderfully. I've never made ricotta before, and couldn't be more pleased with the results! I've always felt pretty ambivalent about ricotta, until now. Mmmm. Served it on toasted rustic bread with roasted grapes. Mmmm.

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over 2 years ago TOM BROWN

my oh my--this stuff came out good the first time, gotmme so fired up i went ahead and made my spinach manicottis immediately!! they were a big hit and the difference was notable. definitely not the last time i do this. now i need to find ways to use the whey

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over 2 years ago Emiko

Ironically, the main use for whey is actually making ricotta (it means "re-cooked" in Italian, because you re-cook the whey used from cheesemaking to get real ricotta). This is actually what you'd call a cream cheese but the leftover liquid is still nutritious and can be kept for boiling pasta in, can be used to water plants (the ones that don't mind a bit of acidity), I've heard it even works wonders as a nice skin treatment if you bathe in it - never tried it myself but someone else might know about it! :)

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over 2 years ago serafinadellarosa

Holy Ricotta, Batman! I just made this and it's SUPERB! We're never buying that stuff in the tub again! WHAMO!

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over 2 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

I'm posting here something I just posted in response to a Hotine question about what to do with the whey that's left over: I made ricotta over the weekend using this -- the best ever -- recipe, and of course saved the whey. I used some of the whey to cook potatoes in, for mashing. Really outstanding! I kept the liquid at a simmer, and had cut the potatoes into smaller than usual pieces. The whey gave the mashed potatoes a marvelous flavor. I also added a couple tablespoons of heavy cream and about a tablespoon of butter. I used 1 1/2 cups of whey per 1 large russet. And best of all, I saved the potato starch-enriched cooking liquid to use in making a loaf of white sandwich bread. Not surprisingly, it turned out spectacularly. ;o)

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3 months ago Horto

how long can we keep whey in the fridge?

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over 2 years ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Just made this over the weekend for brunch - heavenly with jam and biscuits!

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over 1 year ago Hina Khokhar

Yum which which biscuit recipe did you use? Just made this ricotta with beautiful results!

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over 2 years ago Judy at Two Broads Abroad

imadok, I'm so glad you mentioned this. I made this on Saturday and the ricotta seemed too creamy. Em-i-lis thanks for the coaching. The ricotta had a great taste, but not consistency. Thanks.

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over 2 years ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Sure, y'all! Hope you have better luck next time! Imadok, I leave the lid off too.

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over 2 years ago imadok

I just made this, and there is almost no curds and tons of whey. What can I do to fix it? When it is resting for 1 hour off the heat, should the lid be on the pan? I left the lid off, so I wonder if too much heat escaped too quickly? I am currently straining the whey out with a cheesecloth, but after an hour of straining, it is still very thin. It does taste delicious though. I want to use it for ricotta gnocchi, so I need a firm consistency. Thanks!

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over 2 years ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Hi! This has happened to me before too but having now made it at least 40 times, I can tell you that it's probably because you didn't cook it quite long enough. Before lowering the heat to low for the final 2 minutes, make sure the ricotta has pillowed up tent-like. Not huge but definitely puffy areas. In my experience that really curds the cheese; they can then settle during the cool down. And definitely save that whey!

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over 2 years ago imadok

I ended up re-heating the ricotta again, folling your directions, and it turned out much better. I even overheated it a bit at it was still wonderful. I used the whey to make a whole wheat bread that I usually use buttermilk for, and it was astronomically better with the ricotta whey. I also strained my ricotta for a long time - about 4 hours.

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over 2 years ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

I'm so glad you had better success!! That's great!

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over 2 years ago Kitchen Butterfly

Living in Nigeria, fresh heavy cream and buttermilk rarely make appearances in store aisles and so I made this with whole milk, powdered milk, powdered buttermilk and lemon juice. And still it was AWESOME. I ended up making 2 other Food52 recipes - strawberries in a pink cloud and Louisa's cake which were SUPERB. Now I have found some heavy cream, even if ultra pasteurised....and I'm going to repeat the efforts tonight! Thank you Jennifer.

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over 2 years ago rachelib

First ricotta cheese I've made and it's absolutely delicious either straight from the spoon, or in stuffed shells (kids favorite). So easy too.

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over 2 years ago beekeeper

I use nylon tricot instead of cheese cloth for straining homemade cheeses. It works wonderfully and can be washed and reused many, many times.

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over 2 years ago Bevi

I love Jennie's blog and all her recipes. Jenny's jam graced the Metro Food52 party, and was the cornerstone of my holiday gift offerings. Congrats!

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over 2 years ago Judy at Two Broads Abroad

Just made the recipe from Russ Parson's and the LA Times. Will definitely try this one as well.

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over 2 years ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Aah, that would be Hear, Hear! Kids woke me verrrry early this morning! :)

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over 2 years ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

Here, here!!!

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over 2 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

Excellent choice for Wildcard honors. I make this all the time, as much for the whey, though, as for the cheese. It's the best ricotta recipe anywhere, ever. ;o)

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over 2 years ago Wicko

I made this last weekend to use in the Ricotta and Spinach Pie. Divine!

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over 2 years ago fiveandspice

Emily is a trusted source on Scandinavian Cuisine.

Yay!!! Congrats on the wild card Jennie! Perhaps the most well deserved wild card of them all! This recipe is a gem!

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over 2 years ago Jenifer Mangione Vogt

This is great! I primarily cook Italian, so I can't wait to try this. Thank you.

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over 2 years ago Deb Roseman

I made this using just 2% and buttermilk to watch the calories and it was so yummy. Mixed with a little honey and cinnamon and warmed banana slices on a fresh hot tortilla tonight for dessert and on a toasted English muffin this morning for breakfast. So Yummy!

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over 2 years ago Texas Ex

Wow. Incredibly delicious and simple to prepare. What could be better? Used some of it in the Ricotta and Chive Gnocchi recipe courtesy of The Internet Cooking Princess. Added a bit of lemon juice and don't know how it could taste any better.

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almost 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

The whey produced when making this ricotta can be used instead of water to make the best polenta . . . very mild cheese/buttermilk flavor, very light, absolutely delicious. ;o)

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almost 3 years ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

This is such a great tip, AJ. I always hate to toss all that whey. Am excited to try a polenta next time instead!

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over 2 years ago melissav

I also use it to make my oatmeal. Delicious.

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almost 3 years ago crazyblues

LOVE this. Super easy, delicious, and totally impressive to non adventurous cooking friends who think ricotta can only be got at the stores. thanks. I used 1/2 cup cream cause that's all I had, and loved it.

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almost 3 years ago dymnyno

I have seen the same ingredients and method in recipes that called it "farmer's cheese". Isn't ricotta (which means twice boiled) actually made from the resulting whey?

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almost 3 years ago FionaAL

A friend sent me this recipe after having creamy ricotta drizzled with honey at a restaurant. I made it the next day. I couldn't believe how good it was. I roasted cherry and grape tomatoes and served them on lightly toasted rustic bread with the ricotta - yum. The next time I made it, I added a couple of sprigs of rosemary and lemon zest. I removed the rosemary just as the curds began to form. I served it with fresh turkey figs all drizzled in local honey. Needless to say, I love this recipe and I'm having a lot of fun with it too!

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almost 3 years ago WeeklyGreens

Tonight I tried the "DIY Ricotta" in the current issue of Bon Appetit. I've made a similar recipe on my own, the only difference being that I add the souring agent after the milk, cream and salt have already come to a boil. Well, this silly recipe DID NOT WORK! Annoying. I remember this recipe is here and I'm headed back to the store to get ingredients tomorrow. I will try it and I know it will work. And according to these comments, I will never taste better ricotta. Very curious about the buttermilk...

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over 2 years ago Lula Mae Broadway

My friend and I tried that one too and it didn't work! She just made this one and said it was terrific.

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almost 3 years ago Victoria Carr

I made this ricotta for the first time last Saturday and was absolutely stunned by how delicious it was. I must admit I upped the amount of cream and used whole milk so it was rich and creamy. Actually the best ricotta I have ever had. I used it to make my family's manicotti recipe, which I make with crespelle (crepes), and they levitated off the plate. Thank you for this truly delicious recipe. What a keeper!

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over 2 years ago Kathy R

The manicotti sounds fabulous. Have you posted the recipe?

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almost 3 years ago LLStone

I'm using her recipe for ricotta, and putting up a recipe a week. I take it to work and share it with my office mates, spreading it on good, toasted bread. After that, they top it w/ honey and crunchy salt, and I top it w/ salt and pepper. And maybe some tomato spread. Yum, it's my fave ricotta recipe.

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about 3 years ago erinbdm

Wow! I live in Mexico and usually can't get ricotta--certainly not fresh!! I never thought of making it myself until I saw this recipe. I can't get buttermilk here either, so I always just use plain yogurt.It works extremely well in most recipes. I wasn't really thinking about the chemical reaction that has to take place when I made the ricotta for the first time, I just dumped my plain yogurt in instead of buttermilk. Luckily for me, it worked beautifully!

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over 2 years ago MeghanVK

Cool idea with the yogurt - I'll have to try that. I hate buying buttermilk, since I never use all of it, but I always have yogurt around.

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about 3 years ago em-i-lis

Emily is a trusted source on General Cooking.

This is just such an incredible recipe and treat. WOW! I cannot stop making it. Yikes. :)

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about 3 years ago rachelib

I"m converted. So delicious - kids said it made the best stuffed shells ever

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about 3 years ago NickV

Made this tonight and it was excellent!!! Insanely creamy and delicious. I cannot wait to make more that I can share with my friends and family!

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over 3 years ago Smitch

I made this last night; followed the recipe to a T. What did I end up with? The most velvety and rich ricotta I've ever had the pleasure of tasting. Thank you. I'm certain my guests will remember this.

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over 3 years ago AnnaSokolow

I've just tried to make it , it came out too sweet .. I wanted it to be a little more sour. Maybe not enough buttermilk ? What do you think?
Thank you .

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over 3 years ago LLStone

Many ricotta recipes call for lemon juice. I also like it with some tang; I'm adding some lemon juice to the next recipe (about 1/2 lemon squeezed) and I'll let you know how that turns out.

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over 3 years ago marniekwatson

I don't have access to fresh milk where I live - we only have the ultrahomogenized, irradiated stuff that comes in tetrapak boxes - would that still work with this recipe? Or do I need fresh milk? Thanks!

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over 3 years ago melissav

I've made this recipe tons of time and I always use regular organic milk from either Whole Foods or Publix. Definitely try it. It is so delicious and easy. You'll never go back to supermarket ricotta again.

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over 3 years ago LLStone

I cannot quit eating this ricotta! I've eaten it for breakfast, smeared on toast and topped with roasted red peppers; I've eaten it for lunch on pasta and threw it on pizza for dinner. It's very good, and I suspect I'll be putting up a pot a week as well.

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over 3 years ago Oui, Chef

Why have I never made homemade ricotta? Perhaps because I've not had the perfect recipe....no more excuses. - S

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over 3 years ago Jennifer Perillo

Oh my, thank you!

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over 3 years ago TiggyBee

This looks lovely!

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over 3 years ago lapadia

Beautiful recipe to be remembered by!

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over 3 years ago healthierkitchen

This does look like something special! I will have to try this soon as we love fresh ricotta.

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over 3 years ago AntoniaJames

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

I've made this and it is, without question, the best of the various recipes I've tried. The heavy cream gives it the most luxurious texture. I'm a big fan of using buttermilk as the acid, too. I love the taste! I'll be making a batch this evening, in fact. Thanks for sharing this wonderful recipe!! ;o)

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over 3 years ago Jennifer Perillo

You're so very welcome!

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over 3 years ago Bevi

I will most certainly try this - it must make a huge difference in recipes calling for ricotta....

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over 3 years ago Cara Eisenpress

I love this! I'll definitely remember you for it :)

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over 3 years ago Jennifer Perillo

That's my goal ;)

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over 3 years ago Kukla

Dear Jennifer!
I am making Ricotta almost every week. It is low fat, and makes more than 11/2 pound delicious smooth, like Mascarpone, Ricotta.
I use the vey for soups that need something sour, or in pancakes, crepes, and other batters, or to make my own buttermilk.
For me it is the easiest method for Homemade Ricotta.
You don’t need to stir, just watch ones in a while not to miss when the water starts to simmer.
Check out my recipe I just posted: Easy Homemade Ricotta.

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over 3 years ago Jennifer Perillo

Kukla, if you read the recipe, you'll see this one is quite easy too. I have two kids, ages 3 and 8, and make it once or twice a week.

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over 3 years ago Emiko

Love this! I have never made it with buttermilk, which I can never seem to come across in Italy, but have done a tangy version with some freshly squeezed lemon juice, which seems to work well.

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over 3 years ago Jennifer Perillo

Yes, lemon juice is commonly called for, and works well, if that's all you have access to. I've used it in a pinch when I'm out of buttermilk, but really do love using buttermilk as the acid. I find it makes for a more tender curd. But, as you mentioned, the lemon juice does the job too!

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over 3 years ago wssmom

Nicely done!

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over 3 years ago Jennifer Perillo

Thanks!

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over 3 years ago pieceofcake

First thought: why have I not been making homemade ricotta my entire life?

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over 3 years ago Jennifer Perillo

That is what everyone says after they make it the first time :)

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over 3 years ago Lizthechef

Your recipe looks lovely - I'm wondering how to adapt this to a lowered-fat version for our family? Any thoughts? I haven't made ricotta in ages and want to get back to it. Thanks -

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over 3 years ago Jennifer Perillo

You can certainly adapt this to be lower in fat. Just omit the cream and increase the milk to 5 cups, keeping the buttermilk at the same amount of 3/4 cup. I do this when I'm out of cream myself. It won't have the same exact silky mouth-feel, but the flavor is still far above anything store-bought.

I've also made this with 2% milk, but with the cream in those cases, so can't say how the flavor would taste with just reduced fat milk and buttermilk. Enjoy!

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over 3 years ago Lizthechef

Thanks for your advice, Jennifer!

Mrs._larkin_370

over 3 years ago mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

This sounds lovely.

186003_1004761561_1198459_n

over 3 years ago dymnyno

I make ricotta all the time...usually minus the cream. But, I like your basic recipe. I have tried Maria Sinsky's too...