Salted Maple Honeycomb Candy

By • October 20, 2013 • 32 Comments

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Author Notes: This recipe is a miracle of science: add a little baking soda to a dark, maple caramel and soon you have this impossibly crunchy, airy candy. I sprinkle the candy with sea salt to cut the sweetness.Merrill Stubbs

Makes about 2 cups

  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup
  • 1 tablespoon baking soda
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons flaky sea salt, like Maldon
  1. Line a baking sheet with a Silpat mat or some greased parchment.
  2. Combine the sugar and maple syrup with 1/4 cup cold water in a medium, heavy saucepan. Set over medium high heat, stirring just until the sugar dissolves. (After this point, do not stir -- you can swirl the pan occasionally if you'd like.) Let the mixture come to a boil and cook until it reaches nearly 300 degrees and is a dark amber color (this should take 5 to 7 minutes).
  3. Working quickly, remove the pan from the heat and whisk in the baking soda, just enough to mix the two thoroughly. Immediately pour the mixture onto the lined baking sheet, using a heatproof spatula to scrape it from the pan. It will be tempting, but do not smooth the mixture -- you'll get rid of all those air bubbles!
  4. Quickly sprinkle the surface of the candy evenly with the sea salt. Set the baking sheet in a cool, dry place and let the candy cool. When it is hard, break it apart into uneven chunks with your fingers. Note: Dip the candy pieces in melted semisweet chocolate and let them cool again for an even richer treat.
Jump to Comments (32)

Tags: diy, Halloween, seafoam candy

Comments (32) Questions (1)

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3 months ago beejay45

Since the link to the above question isn't working, I guess i'll ask mine here. ;)

Does it have to be baking soda? Or will anything that makes it foam up do the same job? I ask because I added powdered honey to a candy after it was cooked (forgot it at the front end), and it foamed like crazy. It never occurred to me to pour it in a pan and see what I'd got. But I'm wondering now if it would have come out like this.

Any ideas?

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6 months ago Louisa

I'm guessing it will work ok using sorghum instead of maple syrup?

Merrill

6 months ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

I haven't tried it, but it should be fine!

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7 months ago BurgeoningBaker

Could I use honey to give the honeycomb texture and honey flavor?

Merrill

7 months ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

Yes, in fact this is traditionally made with honey!

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7 months ago BurgeoningBaker

What is the ratio as compared to maple syrup?

Merrill

7 months ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

The same!

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9 months ago Anna

Any way to make this without the sugar? Could I increase the maple syrup? I can't have sugar but can have maple syrup and this looks amazing!

Merrill

9 months ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

I haven't tried it without sugar -- sorry not to be of more help!

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11 months ago KakiSue

Genius! Just made this with grade b maple syrup (had it in the fridge) and will make it next time with half maple syrup/half honey........or I might try the Lyle's.....

Stringio

11 months ago pattyrat

I attempted several batches of this for Christmas, but never successfully. Mine also crumbled like sand, and sometimes also had a burnt taste, or the taste of the soda. I'm guessing I either cooked the mixture too long (although it never reached 300 degrees, by 250 it was already turning a very dark color), or on too high heat, and/or didn't sufficiently mix in the bicarb. Might try again to see if I can strike the right balance.

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7 months ago BurgeoningBaker

I had the same experience as you and thus my question posted. Was so hoping this would be awesome.

Merrill

7 months ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

You might want to double-check that your candy thermometer is properly calibrated. (One of mine was old and inaccurate, which tripped me up.)

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11 months ago nina corbetT

I made it and cooked it till 297F, mixed in the bicarb, poured it out and it when it hardened & I broke it up it crumbled into sand, almost like brown sugar. Not crispy just sandy! Help please!

Merrill

11 months ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

Oh, no, so sorry to hear this! It may be due to slight under-mixing of the bicarb -- did the mixture look uniform in color before you poured it out, or was it streaky?

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about 1 year ago Regine


Correction to prior post!

Heather, I have made honeycomb many times and successfully with honey. You can also use corn syrup. In fact, many honeycomb recipes online ask for corn syrup or Lyle Golden Syrup (the latter one is usually used in England). So you could actually replace the 1/2 cup maple syrup in this recipe with either 1/2 cup corn syrup
or honey. But I prefer honey.

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about 1 year ago Regine

Heather, I have made honeycomb many times and successfully with honey syrup. You can also use corn syrup. In fact, many honeycomb syrup ask for corn syrup or Lyle Golden Syrup (the latter one is usually used in England). So you could actually replace the 1/2 cup maple syrup in this recipe with either 1/2 cup honey or 1/2 cup corn syrup. But of course it would no longer be called Maple Honeycomb but just plain Honeycomb.

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about 1 year ago Heather Schöll

Could you make this with honey instead of maple syrup to get a honey flavor honeycomb candy? Just curious if anyone has tried that...

Jillian

about 1 year ago jbban

I made this with the darkest maple syrup I could get my hands on and it is fabulous. The salt is key.
I wanted to dip some in chocolate, but friends and family ate it all before I had a chance!

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about 1 year ago Regine

I find that if you don't mix well, you will indeed get the taste of the soda. You have to strike the right balance (sometimes not too easy) between making sure soda is well incorporated and not waiting too long before pouring mixture onto trays. I have not made this recipe yet though.

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about 1 year ago thepatternedplate

Perhaps, though, as I had mentioned below, the salted part of the honeycomb brought out the soda flavour, whereas the unsalted underside did not, at all. So to me, it doesn't seem a case of undermixing (though I know what you mean by having to judge the timing). That soda flavour never came through in any of the other honeycombs I've made, except here. So salt-less for me!

Merrill

about 1 year ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

Interesting, thanks for sharing this. I didn't taste the soda, but by all means leave off the salt if you prefer it!

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about 1 year ago lizbeth

We make a couple of batches of peanut brittle at Christmas time, and occasionally we can get a taste of the soda. I'm thinking perhaps cmdsmith didnt mix in the soda sufficiently since the recipe states to act quickly. You think maybe?

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about 1 year ago thepatternedplate

I made this, and while the texture turned out perfectly, and the taste was gorgeous, my friend and I got a strong bicarb soda metallic tasting back note. We both wondered about this as the proportions are pretty standard. So we took a bit from the underside of the honeycomb and that was perfect. So for us, the sea salt really brought out the flavour of the bicarb!!! I will make this again, but shall skip the salting!

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about 1 year ago Kathryn

Am I reading this incorrectly or is there a cup of water missing from the directions?

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about 1 year ago Kathryn

No wait I can't read; carry on. :)

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about 1 year ago lizbeth

Please dont think i never cook but what kind of maple syrup is used in this recipe? Surely its not aunt jemima or mrs. butterworths (which is what i keep in my pantry). i thought i would have to go spring for the real thing.

Merrill

about 1 year ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

Yes, you'll want to use the real deal for this recipe!

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about 1 year ago Pamela

like a very quick peanut brittle love it - taste is great

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about 1 year ago violingirl

Can this recipe do with add-ins?? Ie, walnuts, or almond chunks?

Merrill

about 1 year ago Merrill Stubbs

Merrill is a co-founder of Food52.

I don't see why not! But you'd have to stir them in really quickly, with the baking soda.

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about 1 year ago Regine

You should try making a chiffon cake, slice it in 2-3 layers, fill it and cover it with a whipped cream frosting, and then cover entire cake with crushed/crumbled honeycomb. Google Blum's Crunch Coffee Cake. Spectacular looking and delicious. You could make yours a Maple Crunch Cake.