Tassajara Spice Muffins

By • January 15, 2014 • 13 Comments

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Author Notes: My mother has been making this recipe since I can remember. Even as a young, picky child, they were one of my favorites. I’d always insist that at least half be made without raisins—a request that annoyed (and continues to annoy) my father to no end. The recipe comes from an old, well used copy of the Tassajara Bread Book by Edward Espe Brown (http://www.amazon.com/Tassajara-Bread-Book-Edward-Brown/dp/1590308360). They are surprisingly light for muffins made entirely from whole wheat flour, with a lovely sweetness from the honey and a hint of warmth from the spices. Enjoy them for breakfast, with dinner, or at any and all snack times in between.Carey Nershi

Makes 12 muffins

  • 2 cups whole wheat flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon cardamom
  • 1/4 teaspoon cloves
  • 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon ginger
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 cup oil (coconut or organic canola are ideal)
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1 1/2 cups whole milk
  • 1/2 cup raisins (optional)
  1. Preheat oven to 400° F and grease a muffin tin. Combine the dry ingredients (flour, baking powder, salt, spices) and set aside.
  2. Beat together the wet ingredients (egg, oil, honey, milk). If using coconut oil, melt it over low heat until it liquefies first. Quickly fold the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients until just combined. If adding raisins, fold them in as well.
  3. Spoon batter into muffin tin and bake for 20 minutes.
Jump to Comments (13)

Comments (13) Questions (0)

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about 1 month ago Doug

Would rice or almond milk work? My 'other' is lactose intolerant.

Emfraiche

10 months ago EmFraiche

Thanks for the wonderful recipe! I added a couple pecan halves to the tops of the muffins which all agreed was a nice touch.

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10 months ago Tutti

Baking powder or baking soda?

Emfraiche

10 months ago EmFraiche

I noticed this discrepancy also but went ahead and used baking powder which worked just fine.

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10 months ago Carey Nershi

Whoops! Sorry about that, and thanks for the catch. It should be baking powder — recipe amended.

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10 months ago Tutti

(o: Thanks! I made these... So delicious! Thank you for sharing!!!

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10 months ago Valentina Solfrini

Dear Carey,

Thank you for being awesome.
That is all.

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10 months ago Carey Nershi

? ? ?

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10 months ago Sarah

any chance of finding out a source for that ceramic tea kettle?

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10 months ago Carey Nershi

Isn't she a beaut?! I actually unearthed that thing from one of my mother's cluttered cabinets when I took these photos. It's decades old, but it was made by a woman named Anne Meyer. (Her son Caleb Meyer currently sells her work out of his studio in Philly.)

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10 months ago Sarah

thanks!

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10 months ago Helens

Am I right in thinking that you used canelé and madeline moulds rather than muffin tins? It looks fantastic.

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10 months ago Carey Nershi

The smaller muffins were made in a mold that looks somewhat similar to a canelé mold, but much shorter. (I haven't a clue where that pan came from and my mother doesn't remember either, which is a shame!) The larger muffins were made in a John Wright cast iron pan. (They come in lots of fun shapes.)