Enchiladas Suizas

By • February 6, 2014 • 36 Comments

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Author Notes: Chicken enchiladas with a smooth and savory green sauce have always been one of my go-to weeknight dinners. It's a great dish to make with leftover roasted, grilled or even rotisserie chicken. And faces always light up around here when I say: "We're having Enchiladas Suizas for dinner tonight."zindc

Makes 8 enchiladas

  • 1 medium white or yellow onion
  • 4 large or 6 small tomatillos
  • 2 poblano chiles (or 1 can of whole green chiles)
  • 3 to 4 cloves of garlic, unpeeled
  • 1 1/2 cups chicken stock
  • 1 handful cilantro leaves and stems, plus more leaves for garnish
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano, preferably Mexican
  • 1 pinch ground allspice or clove
  • 1 teaspoon cumin, ground
  • Zest and juice of one lime
  • 1 teaspoon salt, plus more to taste
  • 1 jalapeño chile, seeds removed (optional)
  • 2 cups boneless cooked chicken, shredded, sliced or diced
  • 8 corn tortillas
  • 2 cups shredded jack or mild cheddar cheese
  • 1/2 cup sour cream, crème fraîche, or Mexican crema
  1. Heat the broiler. Peel and quarter onion. Remove papery husks and wash tomatillos. Cut poblanos in half lengthwise and remove stems and seeds. On a foil-lined sheet pan, place onion, tomatillos, unpeeled garlic cloves and poblanos skin side up. Broil vegetables until mildly charred, turning the onion pieces and tomatillos over after a few minutes to expose other sides to the heat source. Take care that the garlic doesn't get too burnt.
  2. Scrape blackened skin from the poblanos, peel the garlic and put vegetables into a blender; include any juices from the baking sheet. (Drain and add canned green chiles, if using.) Add chicken stock, cilantro, spices, lime juice and zest, and salt and blend until completely puréed. Taste, and if you want it to be spicier, add the jalapeño and purée again until completely smooth.
  3. Pour contents of blender into a heavy-bottomed sauce pan and simmer for 20 to 30 minutes until slightly reduced. Taste and add more salt, if needed. If salsa is too thick, add a little bit of water to it. Lower oven temperature to 350° F.
  4. Make the enchiladas one at a time: Dip a tortilla in the salsa until just softened. Lay out on a plate, put some chicken across the middle of the tortilla and roll it up. Place in a baking dish or directly on an oven-safe dinner plate. When all of the tortillas have been made, ladle the salsa generously over them, sprinkle the cheese over the top, and place the baking dish or plates into the oven. Bake for 15 minutes, until chicken filling is heated through and cheese has melted. Serve with generous dollop of sour cream on top, and some chopped fresh cilantro.
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Comments (36) Questions (0)

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11 days ago Markhous

The photo makes these enchiladas look so appealing. Don't know why everyone is so hung up on "authentic". Everything starts somewhere. You think when You go to korea and order a cheeseburger it's not going to come with kimchee? In Japan squid is a common pizza topping. Not very authentic, but still good. A good cook knows how to make their ingredients work for them. These look wonderful.

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19 days ago Janie Lowe

Made this last night and loved the sauce. Doubled the recipe for the sauce as it is time consuming to make. Blistered the peppers and roasted the onions, tomatillos and garlic on the grill. My people like my usual enchiladas better as the filling is more complex/tasty. Will make again but will add more ingredients to the filling. Thanks for the sauce extraordinaire!

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26 days ago Jocelyn Lawry Monacelli

Please provide Nutritional Content on ALL recipes please !!!!

Zora_margolis

26 days ago zindc

That is an issue that should be taken up with Merrill and Amanda. This is a forum for home cooks; it takes a professional nutritionist to calculate what you are looking for. Perhaps you should stick to recipe websites that provide the information you want.

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27 days ago Quinta531

Definitely corn tortillas but they should be lightly fried in a little oil in a pan before being filled and put in any sauce (otherwise they soak up the sauce making their texture less than ideal) plus tortillas in the US from the market are terrible, want excellent? make your own- also, I would not cook the sauce for so long as it will get thick and then lose flavor when it has to be made more liquid later; the ingredients for the sauce are all strong tasting so the addition of a pinch of clove is not needed. Why would you char the chiles, onions and garlic only to get rid of this later? Another level of flavor wasted. The sauce has superfluous ingredients too. Mexico does not have Cheddar nor Monterrey Jack Cheeses, you want to be genuine use Oaxaca, Chihuahua or Mexican String Cheese. Not the worst recipe. There are NO decent flour tortillas in the US for the most part (you have this thing against lard so they will never be good), flour tortillas are NOT used for enchiladas. If you are concerned about Atkins or carbs, tomatillos are not Atkins friendly and will take you out of ketosis by the way.... You should read up on fats too which everyone needs in their diet, low fat is not the way to go, but this is just me and I'm just a Chef so what do I know?

Zora_margolis

26 days ago zindc

"Not the worst recipe"--really? That's what's known as a left-handed compliment. I would like to respond to a couple of your criticisms: frying tortillas before filling and rolling them to make enchiladas is one of several ways to soften the tortillas. Sometimes I moisten them and lay them on a gas flame for a few seconds. Using an extra pan and frying each tortilla, which can make a mess on the stovetop, might not matter to a professional chef who has people cleaning up behind her, but I am a home cook and often look for simpler solutions. I like to let the sauce cook a little longer on low heat to blend the flavors and mellow the sharpness of the acidic ingredients. Don't want to cook it that long? It's your call. Many Mexican dishes, especially cooked salsas and braises use allspice--probably from the historical influence of Moorish Spain. You are perfectly welcome to leave it out. The burned poblano chile skin is discarded, and the papery peel of the garlic. Nothing else. Are you suggesting that these should not be peeled before using in a green sauce? That's a new one on me.

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2 months ago swartz01

Hi Olga! There are all kinds of special diet tortillas in regular grocery stores these days so if you look, you may just find carb-free ones.
I'll be trying these soon myself, but will probably use flour tortillas and Chihuahua cheese....not the healthiest options, but I want to try them the way I know I'll like them before I start making a bunch of changes. Good luck - hope you find what you need

Zora_margolis

2 months ago zindc

Please make these enchiladas with corn tortillas! The masa that is used to make corn tortillas is THE quintisential flavor of Mexican cuisine, and the true flavor of these enchiladas is dependent on corn tortillas. Flour tortillas bring nothing to the party, IMO. I use them for burritos because they come in a large size, and that's about it.

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about 1 month ago Albeast Oneone

this lady knows what she's talking about! NO FLOUR TORTILLAS! Please listen to her!

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about 1 month ago Albeast Oneone

Please, don't mutilate the soul of the recipe with mutant tortillas. Just make it carefully, cut down a fat as much as possible and then eat A SMALLER PORTION.

Zora_margolis

about 1 month ago zindc

If you look carefully at the recipe, you will notice that: 1) if made with corn tortillas, it is gluten free; 2) there is no added fat or oil in the salsa and the boneless chicken is essentially fat-free, as well. The cheese and the crema are the only sources of fat in the recipe, and the amount of those two elements can be minimized without ruining the dish. The salsa on its own can be used on fish or vegetables--it absolutely transformed the life of a friend on an extreme no-carb, no dairy, vegetarian weight-loss regimen, who was desperate because the diet book's recipes that she was following were so bland and boring.

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2 months ago Heidi Honeygan

Happy Valentines Day! Thank you for this awesome recipe, I just made it for my family as a Valentine's day dinner, and everyone loved it!!! I added finely chopped onions to my chicken filling, and it added a nice little something. Thanks again!!!!

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2 months ago antbitme

This was so fun to make, and the end result is delicious! There's just one problem: I don't think I can ever settle for canned enchilada sauce again!

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2 months ago Nola Unverferth

how about using a jar of salsa verde instead? I need as many shortcuts as possible.

Zora_margolis

2 months ago zindc

Well, it's a free country, as the saying goes. My experience with jarred salsas is that most of them are intended for use as a chip dip, and they are much more acidic than the sauce in my recipe. I believe that Rick Bayless has produced a line of jarred "cooking" salsas, and the green sauce in that line would probably be closest. But the point of my recipe is that the salsa is very quick and easy to make. Maybe not as fast as opening a jar, but perhaps you could make the salsa over the weekend and have it ready to use in the refrigerator. It will keep for a couple of weeks before going bad.

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about 1 month ago Albeast Oneone

Look for a Mexican brand of salsa verde called Herdez, the are a Mexican classic and an easy substitute. However, Tomatillos are ubiquitous in your local produce section today. Please take the time to find them, it will be a revelation AND your intro to a new facet of Mexican cuisine.

Stringio

3 months ago Tom Cruz

You must add "frijoles refritos" fried beans.

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about 1 month ago Albeast Oneone

Tom has a point, "Spanish rice" and refried beans are the classic sides for this dish. Don't be afraid of the term refried, you can make healthy PUREED beans at home without a hint of fat! Just boil a pound of pinto beans in beef, chicken or veggie or your fave stock with salt, pepper & a ton of garlic and onions. Then when they are done remove most of the liquid and take a stick blender or potato masher to them and reduce them over low heat. Voila!

Zora_margolis

about 1 month ago zindc

Señor Oneone: while I didn't address the issue of sides with the enchiladas, you seem to be a man who knows his Mex-Mex cuisine. My method for making frijoles is to start by sauteeing a chopped onion in a small amount of lard or bacon fat. It adds so much flavor to the final dish, and minimal extra calories. As we are all learning, pork fat is not necessarily the enemy of good health we were led to believe it was. I add a little bit of cumin, ancho chile powder, and Mexican oregano to bloom in the fat. After adding the dried beans (I rarely soak) and water, I throw in a carrot and a couple of bay leaves, and a tied up bouquet garnie of thyme, celery leaf, and parsley. I don't discard any of the flavorful broth. After removing the herbs and pureeing with a stick blender, I leave it cooking to reduce to the desired consistency. Muy delicioso!

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3 months ago janey boyd

Add spinach to filling….Yum!

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3 months ago Maureen

Amber, right the first time...

Stringio

3 months ago Amber Gibson

Fry's the corn shells. Sorry

Stringio

3 months ago Amber Gibson

My mother makes these with a slightly different recipe. She adds milk to the chili sauce and fries the corn shells. It's amazing.

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about 1 month ago Albeast Oneone

Yes, the classic thing is to let the sauce cool a little, then add a little sour cream to it. YUM!

Majestic-as-fck

3 months ago Brandon Li

Yum..............you could put this Suizas sauce on a pair of jump boots and even they would taste good :)

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about 1 month ago Albeast Oneone

I keep picking bits of the steel shank from between my teeth, but yeah, tasty!

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3 months ago Maureen

Zindc, I have made numerous types of enchi's and would love to try yours, and I wonder if anything else can be rolled into tortilla with the chicken. Seems like cooked chicken alone might dry out inside there.

Zora_margolis

3 months ago zindc

If the chicken seems dry, I sometimes mix it with some of the salsa verde before rolling the enchiladas. That way the sauce flavor is both inside and outside. They really aren't in the oven long enough for the chicken inside the enchiladas to dry out. Sometimes the sauce on the outside gets a bit thickened, and I add a bit more after they come out of the oven.

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3 months ago Olga

Zindc - thank you for the suggestions!

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3 months ago Olga

Sounds delish! Could you recommend a non-grain/carb alternative for the tortillas and would the prep be the same? Ex. Kale? Anything else?

Zora_margolis

3 months ago zindc

Maybe thin lengthwise slices of eggplant, roasted slightly to soften them could be manipulated to roll with a chicken filling. But they wouldn't be enchiladas, which are by definition tortillas rolled around a filling. You can use the sauce in many ways, as a topping for cooked vegetables or beans, or on grilled fish.

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3 months ago Kathryn Miller

I am on Atkins and I plan to leave the tortillas out entirely and make a casserole out of it. Maybe throw some spinach in there

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about 1 month ago Albeast Oneone

zindc knows what she's talking about! you can use the left over sauce to make some amazing huevos rancheros, OR try poaching some Halibut OR shrimp in it! Or pour it over your Steak! WOW!

Stringio

3 months ago Kiara Sexton

Loved these!! Thanks

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6 months ago AnnieHynes

I think the corn tortillas needed to be heated before being rolled . Turned out mushy

Zora_margolis

6 months ago zindc

I prefer to soften the tortillas for rolling enchiladas by dipping them in the sauce, but you could certainly soften them over a gas flame after sprinkling with a little bit of water. Then, if your filling and sauce were heated, you could fill the enchiladas, cover them with sauce, sprinkle on the cheese and let the heat of the sauce melt the cheese. It's the baking time in the oven that makes the enchiladas soft--or to use your word, mushy. I like them that way.