Ciabatta

By • August 20, 2014 • 25 Comments

33 Save

If you like it, save it!

Save and organize all of the stuff you love in one place.

Got it!

If you like something…

Click the heart, it's called favoriting. Favorite the stuff you like.

Got it!


Author Notes: This simple bread can be mixed by hand and involves virtually no shaping!erinmcdowell

Makes 2 loaves

Biga

  • 2 cups bread flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon instant yeast
  • 1 cup room temperature water

Dough

  • 3 cups bread flour
  • 1 tablespoon instant yeast
  • 2 teaspoons Kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 cup warm water
  • Biga (above)
  1. The night before you want to make the bread, mix the biga. In a medium bowl, mix the ingredients just until combined. Cover with plastic wrap, and let sit in a cool, dry place overnight.
  2. When you're ready to make the bread, mix the flour, yeast, and salt to combine in a large bowl. Add the water and the biga and mix (with your hands or a wooden spoon) until the mixture comes together to form a ball.
  3. Continue to mix by hand until the dough develops some gluten structure and appears smoother in texture, 4 to 5 minutes. The dough will be very sticky (almost soupy) -- never fear, that’s how it’s supposed to be! Transfer the dough to a slightly oiled bowl and let rise until double in size, about 1 hour.
  4. Sift flour onto your work surface and over the dough. Gently stretch the dough onto your work surface, forming a rectangular shape. Divide the dough into two even pieces.
  5. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper, and lightly dust the parchment with flour. Stretch each piece of dough very gently as you transfer it to the prepared baking sheet. Sift more flour over each loaf, and let rise for another hour.
  6. Heat the oven to 475° F. Place a baking sheet in the lower third part of the oven and measure out three cups of ice cubes into a large bowl. Place the sheet with the bread onto the baking stone (if you have one), and immediately toss the ice onto the empty baking sheet. Close the oven, and bake until the loaves are deeply golden, 35 to 45 minutes. If the ciabatta is browning too quickly, lower the temperature to 400° F.
Jump to Comments (25)

Comments (25) Questions (0)

Default-small
Default-small
1403072_10100277510928105_1019946290_o

15 days ago juleeclip

This looks great! I'd love to make this for a dinner party this weekend. How long can the biga sit out before you need to use it? I plan to make that the night before, but have a commitment in the morning and won't get around to actually making the final dough until around 2 p.m. the next day. Is that too long?

Default-small

about 1 month ago Jill G

It just came out of the oven and is perfect. Great recipe!

3572

about 1 month ago erinmcdowell

So glad you enjoyed it!

Default-small

about 1 month ago margaret fox-tully

There's a reference to rising "again" once loaves have been formed but no mention of first rise. I'm assuming that should occur after dough has been mixed in the bowl, yes?

3572

about 1 month ago erinmcdowell

Hi Margaret, in step three, I say to transfer the dough to an oiled bowl and rise until double in size, one hour. Hope that helps!

Default-small

about 1 month ago AnnieHynes

Just pulled the 2nd loaf out of the oven. Both turned out beautifully without a stone at 475 for 38-40 minutes each. Crust is amazing

3572

about 1 month ago erinmcdowell

Annie - so glad you enjoyed it!

Default-small

about 1 month ago AnnieHynes

Hopefully this works without a stone....

3572

about 1 month ago erinmcdowell

It can definitely work without a stone, but the stone just helps ensure a crisp crust - helpful, but not necessary.

Default-small

about 1 month ago AnnieHynes

Each rectangle of dough needs it's own cookie sheet. Mine rose and became one big loaf

3572

about 1 month ago erinmcdowell

A great point - I'll make an edit to the recipe above!

Default-small

about 1 month ago gasgirl

PLEASE...can we have the grams or oz for this recipe! and thank you for all the great directions!

3572

about 1 month ago erinmcdowell

Hi gasgirl, I'll try to put up weight later this week, thanks for the suggestion.

Open-uri20140830-19415-18vyuk9

29 days ago Dyana Wu

Shifting a couple of grams here and there to round up the numbers without overly affecting overall ratio, grammage:

280 g bread flour
1.5g teaspoon instant yeast
200g room temperature water

400g bread flour
9g instant yeast
12g Kosher salt
400g warm water

Default-small

29 days ago gasgirl

thanks Dyana....I appreciate it...no longer bake with volume....

Open-uri20140830-19415-18vyuk9

29 days ago Dyana Wu

Happy to help! :)

Open-uri20130911-7867-1i0k143

about 1 month ago Jeffrey Becker

What is the recommended temperature for baking?

3572

about 1 month ago erinmcdowell

In step 6, I recommend heating the oven to 475 degrees Fahrenheit - seems hot, but it most emulates the temperature of a bread baking oven!

Open-uri20140830-19415-18vyuk9

about 1 month ago Dyana Wu

Based on the article itself, oven temp 475F, turn down to 400F if overbrowning, bulk proof 1h, I'd say preheat the stone as long as you usually preheat your stone for :)

3572

about 1 month ago erinmcdowell

Thanks Dyana, I've adjusted the recipe here to reflect the article's specifics!

Default-small

about 1 month ago Karole

Agree with Adam - weight, not volume measurement for flour is essential for bread recipes.

Img_7045_edit

about 1 month ago zephyr050

Oven temp? Preheat stone how long?

Default-small

about 1 month ago Shades

Recipe is missing bulk ferment and oven temp.

3572

about 1 month ago erinmcdowell

Hi Shades! In step 3, I say to bulk ferment the dough in a lightly oiled bowl until double in size, 1 hour. In step 6, I recommend heating the oven to 475 degrees Fahrenheit. Thanks!

Default-small

about 1 month ago Adam

Any chance you could add weights instead of just volumes?