Cabernet Peppercorn Mustard

By • February 7, 2011 • 2 Comments

6 Save


Author Notes: I think homemade mustard is the best kept secret this side of the Mississippi. It's ridiculously easy, very inexpensive, and provides the most amusing culinary blank canvas. Once you figure out the basic proportions and "mellowing" times, there is no end to your delicious mustard possibilities. I first made this recipe as a gift for my dad - and so we've nicknamed this blend Master Horse Mustard in his honor. It's bold, yet has a very smooth taste and just begs to be paired with salumi, stinky cheese and crackers. Or a roast beef sandwich. Or swirled in a pan sauce. Or....like I said, there's no end to the possibilities.

Note: I use Penzey's powdered mustard and crushed yellow/brown mustard seed, but any good quality mustard powder/seed will do. I also prefer to use 4 oz. jars and make lots of flavors at once, but the recipe multiplies easily for making bigger batches.
zest in the midwest

Makes 4 oz jar

  • 1 sterilized 4 oz jar (with lid)
  • 1 small plastic or glass cup/bowl to mix mustard
  • 1 plastic spoon or fork
  • 3-4 tablespoons yellow mustard powder
  • 2 tablespoons crushed mustard seeds (if you want a smooth mustard, substitute more mustard powder)
  • 1 tablespoon all purpose flour
  • 1 teaspoon freshly cracked black peppercorns
  • 2-3 tablespoons Cabernet Sauvignon wine (or any full bodied red you have on hand)
  • 1-2 tablespoon white vinegar
  1. Combine the dry ingredients into your mixing vessel - stir a few times to combine. Where I've given ranges, add the smaller quantity - the rest will be reserved for getting the texture you want after the liquid has been added.
  2. Add 2 tbsp of red wine and 1 tbsp of vinegar. Mix well. Depending on your desired consistency of mustard, continue adding mustard powder and wine (I usually aim for the consistency of a grainy dijon mustard).
  3. Once you've gotten the consistency you desire, carefully spoon mustard into sterilized jar. Wipe off rim, and seal jar. Mustard is incredibly strong when first mixed with liquid, and it mellows over time. Let the mustard sit in a cool, dark place for 2 weeks before you try it. If it's too spicy for you, let it sit for another week. If it's just right, put mustard in the refrigerator (cooling halts the "mellowing" process). I've kept mustards in the fridge for several months successfully.
Jump to Comments (2)

Tags: Easy

Comments (2) Questions (0)

Default-small
Default-small
186003_1004761561_1198459_n

over 3 years ago dymnyno

I will try anything with Cabernet in it! Sounds creative, not amusing (red wine is very serious business!)

Gator_cake

over 3 years ago hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

This is really cool! Seems like a great little gift.