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All questions

When is bread dough considered ripe?

I'm using the ripe test described by Red Star (here: http://www.redstaryeast... and here: http://www.redstaryeast...) and I wanted to make sure I was doing it correctly.

For the first rise, the two indentations remain, but the dough gently deflates. Is that right?

For the second rise, the indentation remains, but I notice much of the dough in the indentation gently inflating again.

As I've never used the ripe test, I'd appreciate your thoughts!

asked by passifloraedulis over 2 years ago
2 answers 2487 views
Dscn2212
boulangere

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added over 2 years ago

Dough is adequately proofed when you can gently poke it, and the indentation remains, whether it is on the first or second proofing. It should never deflate. If it deflates, it's been over proofed. It deflates because the gluten doesn't have any more spring, or stretch to give, and it literally breaks apart.

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added over 2 years ago

Thank you. If the dough has been over proofed -- does it mean it's ruined? Is the only way to guard against over proofing to poke at the dough frequently?