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Isn't it Odd? (about the Pancake Contest)

Isn't it odd that not one of us submitted a recipe for a noodles pancake? I wanted to do a Chinese noodle cake but because 52 had some technical system glitches, i had to re-enter a number of recipes, so i didn't have time. But it's surprising, yes? I am thinking that perhaps 52 does not have many Chinese members? (Of course it's also possible that Chinese members wanted to focus on other recipes for this contest.)

asked by LE BEC FIN over 2 years ago
37 answers 1383 views
Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

Different topic slightly, but as long as I was at it, i just counted up the entries: only 12 of the 178 recipe entries in the pancakes contest- have poultry, meat or seafood ingredients!(not counting eggs)

Cristina-014-web-final
added over 2 years ago

Ha, I am responsible for three of those!

Smokin_tokyo
added over 2 years ago

I wasn't sure what qualified as a pancake. Does gyoza, harumaki, dim sum, wonton, count? I could have added a lot here but thought maybe eggs for pancakes was a requirement/

Dsc_0122.nef-1
added over 2 years ago

If eggs were a requirement in pancakes, then all the Indian recipes would be left out.. Which may still end up happening but not because of the egg factor.. Wontons, I thought were clubbed in the dumpling category..Should be interesting to analyze how the winners & the CP selections are made...

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

well i don't think ggyoza or wontons count- they are dumplings(wrapped, or poached/fried/baked in the case of European dumplings) but shrimp pancakes with taro stix crust- could be a pancake (flat/round/fried) and that is a dimsum item. Lots of pancakes don't require eggs in their batters(see all the Indian recipes in this contest) but they seem to be made in a pan and to be round, generally. does that make sense?

Smokin_tokyo
added over 2 years ago

I still think they might had counted after all. Saffranspannkaka is a pudding isn't it? So if the categories can get bent in that direction, then flat/round/fried isn't (wasn't) the criterion.

Gator_cake
hardlikearmour

hardlikearmour is a trusted home cook.

added over 2 years ago

I was working on a soba noodle pancake, but just didn't get the kinks worked out in time.

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

that's so funny you would say soba, because i had in mind 2 types- soba noodles pancakes are in Stan Frankenthaller's Occidental Tourist (genuflect, genuflect), and chinese egg noodles (Barbara Tropp's Mastering the Art of Chinese Cooking; another genuflect, genuflect) so they were to be my springboards.

mrsl, basically you cook noodles to al dente and press them into a small bottomed hot oil pan with a weight, flip and brown other side. incorporate things into the noodles themselves or do a topping for the noodles cake. the italians, iirc, do that cooked pasta tossed with egg- as the 'shell' that is filled- on that domed dish that was featured in the film Big Night. Just can't think of the name of the dish. Not a pancake though, rather a domed casserole, baked.
Hmmm, i just visualized an Italian Easter egg made of 2 of those domed dishes put together!! Cut it open and out flow the goodles!! I want an oozy carbonara filling in mine, please!
best,
mindy

Mrs._larkin_370
mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

added over 2 years ago

what's a noodle pancake? LBF, submit yours anyway. I am very curious!

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

yes, cristina, i guess we think alike- 4 of my 11 (OMG) are amongst those 12 as well!
yours in savory pancakeness!,
mindy

Farmer's_market
added over 2 years ago

LBF, I think the dish you're thinking of from Big Night is a Timpano. But its shell isn't made of pasta/egg - rather, it's a pastry crust enclosing pasta, meats and/or meatballs, cheeses, eggs, etc. (Timpano = drum in Italian, which its shape sort of resembles.) I remember an interview with Stanley Tucci, where he said the one in the movie is from his own family's recipe. Intriguing dish, but definitely not pancake-related.

However, I sometimes make a big 'pancake' of pasta (usually spaghetti) bound with beaten eggs, to use up scraps of vegetables, cheeses and such from the fridge. Sort of a frittata crossed with a pancake crossed with no time to get to the grocery store before dinner.

Dsc00859_2
added over 2 years ago

Never thought of Chinese noodle cake as a pancake, but why not? If it's flattish and cake-ish, go for it. Good use for leftover roast chicken.

Chris_in_oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added over 2 years ago

Wow, thanks, amysarah. All the times I've seen that film, and I always thought it was a sheet of pasta covering the dish. It's making me think I should try one.

Farmer's_market
added over 2 years ago

Some recipes might use pasta dough - there may be variations, I don't know. But I think the classic recipe uses a pastry dough; maybe it looks like a sheet of pasta because it's rolled out very thinly?

If you try it, please take a photo for us - quite an undertaking!

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

amysarah, i think you may be wrong. maybe not about what is made in the film (so interesting- Tucci's comment!) but about the dish itelf. I have it featured in the Pasta volume of that old Time Life series, and it shows the outer shell of a dish like this (if not Timpano itself) that is made up of pasta. I will try to access my book to check my memory! i'll report back! In the meantime, there is this mario b.version of the same dish i am referencing:
http://www.food.com/recipe...
best,
mindy
wwwcottonarboretum.com/

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

amysarah, look what i found! isn't this beaUUUUtiful??:
http://www.thefoodinmybeard...

Farmer's_market
added over 2 years ago

LBF - disclaimer: I'm no timpano expert - I've just seen several recipes with a thin pastry crust. But like I said, there are no doubt other variations - such as a pasta crust. Fillings probably vary a little from cook to cook as well. Either way, it sounds like a lot of fun to make.

Junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 2 years ago

A timpano definitely has a pasta "crust." Long, fat, hollow pasta (can't remember the varietal name) is wrapped around the mold before the filling is put in. it kind of looks like a beehive when it's unmolded.

Smokin_tokyo
added over 2 years ago

Wow, I bet the Timpano is a real crowd pleaser. Somehow i lost the thread of this conversation-- you were going to make one with noodle pancake on the outside?

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

hi there gal, i started off just saying that it was surprising that no 52ers entered a noodle pancake recipe (Chinese) in the contest. Then I just mentioned the pasta drum dish as an example of how pasta could be glued together (like the Chinese noodle cake idea but for the Mediterranean-centric Food52!). amysarah uses egg mixed with cooked spaghetti to make a pasta cake, but the chinese just use the starchy cooked noodles themselves- pressed down- to make a noodle cake (I am referencing Barbara Tropp here.). Is that clearer?
best,
mindy

Smokin_tokyo
added over 2 years ago

Thanks. And the lasagna timpago blog was very detailed, very awesome.

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

p.s. (now that the , winners, and just now, Wildcard- have been announced.)...... Since WHEN is a dumpling a pancake? Gyoza is a pancake?Hellooooo? Please tell me what makes it a pancake? or have I misunderstood>> can something be chosen a Wildcard when it is not eligible (by definition) for the Contest it was entered in?is a Wildcard unrelated to a contest?(I'm new to 52 so I know i can be wrong about 52-anything!)

If i were defining 'pancake', i would say it must be:
How it's cooked: a) almost always griddled/fried (unless it is called a 'baked pancake', in which case it is still capable of being griddled/fried)
and
What it looks like: b)almost always round and usually flat
and
What it is made of: c) its main ingredient or significant ingredient is almost always a starch or a starch and protein together

I'm not saying the above is a fool-proof definition of "Pancake" but don't all the CPs and winners meet the above criteria- EXCEPT the gyoza Wildcard?
best,
mindy
(
does it say "Question Authority" ?> :-}

Dsc00859_2
added over 2 years ago

Mindy, It appears that the gyoza recipe wasn't entered in the pancake contest. According to the subhead, it was entered a previous (dumpling) contest & has nothing to do with the pancake contest. Wildcards seem to come out infrequently and unannounced, and are not necessarily related to the current contest. They're just a fun surprise awarded at the whim of our esteemed editors :) --worthy recipes that may have escaped notice elsewhere.

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

above, below by sign-off, it is supposed to say: :-}

Smokin_tokyo
added over 2 years ago

I mean at the top of this thread, I questioned whether gyoza, harumaki, dim sum ( gyoza is a kind of dim sum), won ton, etc. would qualify as pancakes and it seemed like everyone thought no, so maybe A & M should be more specific on contest rules.

52
added over 2 years ago

LBF I have been going through your recipes most of them are GREAT real winner don't worry even if your recipes are not noticed

Mrs._larkin_370
mrslarkin

Mrs. Larkin is a trusted source on Baking.

added over 2 years ago

Here is food52's definition of Wildcard: http://www.food52.com/blog...

Chris_in_oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added over 2 years ago

Yeah, wildcards have nothing to do with contest themes, and it'll be great if it encourages people to make their own gyoza instead of buying them frozen in a bag.

Meanwhile, you've got me pretty intrigued, and I'm going to do a lot more timpano research!

Chris_in_oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added over 2 years ago

Well, it turns out that it's pretty easy to research the timpano recipe from the Big Night.

Stanley Tucci learned all the cooking he used in the flim from his mother, Joan Tucchi She and some co-authors have published a book, "Cucina & Famiglia: Two Italian Families Share Their Stories, Recipes, And Traditions," that details the recipe, including specifying the pan in which it should be cooked. The book is pretty much out of print, I think judging from the price, but still available, along with the pan, from Amazon.

There's a 2007 blog post about following the recipe from the book at http://prouditaliancook...

It's definitely pasta dough.

Farmer's_market
added over 2 years ago

Well, there you go. And here I am spreading misinformation about a timpano! Any chance I can parlay that into my own show on Food Network? (I kid.)

Farmer's_market
added over 2 years ago

Interesting, mrslarkin. Was sure I'd seen recipes using pastry before, but since I've never encountered an actual timpano in real life, who knew? So much for my second career on TVFN...but it sounds like this is one of those dishes that bends to idiosyncratic family tradition. Best kind.

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

amysarah,you have backhandedly hit that nail>>Iin my 45 years of cooking, the old Maharishi aphorism of or holds for cooking trads as with everything else. 'Tradition' rarely does not have exceptions! As individual as our fingerprints are the ways that we cook, right? And the longer a 'tradition' exists, the more variations you will see in it! All it takes is one cook calling a Timbalo a Timpano, and..............!!
best,
mindy
www.cottonarboretum.com/

Chris_in_oslo
Greenstuff

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

added over 2 years ago

I liked this paragraph from the story that ran with the NYT recipe:

"The cooks who develop and style the food for today's movies equate their cinematic cooking with the curvy glamour girls of the 1940's. Both are larger than life. Deborah Di-Sabatino, the food stylist who developed the food and the climactic timpano (Italian for kettledrum) for ''Big Night,'' says that movie cuisine is not everyday fare but grand and complicated fantasy, far beyond the ken of the run-of-the-mill cook."

Guess that's why I never made one. But I'm getting sorely tempted! Thanks for a fun discussion.

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

greenstuff, NO WAY are you a runofthemill cook. YOU is a chef! And you could DEF make this dish- check out the
great photos and stepby step here:
http://www.thefoodinmybeard...

This foodinmybeard guy is great!

Photo_squirrel
added over 2 years ago

i wonder if quotation marks cause problems with text being deleted from 52 posts. my Maharishi quotes and a related idea- Never say Always or Never- disappeared from my above post. weird.