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How long before refrigerated beef goes bad?

asked by MsCoco78 almost 4 years ago
4 answers 8389 views
A9f88177 5a41 4b63 8669 9e72eb277c1a  waffle3
added almost 4 years ago


A lot depends upon packaging and temperature.

Does it have a sell-by date stamped on the label? There's a chart here:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov...

In any case, don't go by color. Brown beef is usually the result of oxygen deprivation -- a good thing, despite what most shoppers believe.

23b88974 7a89 4ef5 a567 d442bb75da04  avatar
added almost 4 years ago

In addition to the sell by date guide give the beef a smell. Bad meat will stink like doo-doo

51d6debe 8184 4f26 9614 c25e2aa571c3  p3200173
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added almost 4 years ago

It also depends to a degree on the cuts; ground beef and organ meats will go off faster than muscle cuts. If you see a lable that say's "Manager's special, reduced for quick sale" use it on the same day.

Lately at a local chain supermarket I've seen ground beef for a surprising low price--- $1.99 per pound. Reading the label closely it reads "Product of USA, Canada, Mexico, Australia..." That is effing scary. Your burger could have cow parts from multiple countries. Contagions spread in the grinding process.

A9f88177 5a41 4b63 8669 9e72eb277c1a  waffle3
added almost 4 years ago


This is one of those rare times I have to disagree with my esteemed colleague Pierino. A "manager's special" indicates the sell-by date is fast approaching. The date is set, somewhat arbitrarily, based on the type of packaging being used. The packaging regulates how quickly the myoglobins in the meat turn from purple to pink to brown due to exposure or lack of exposure to oxygen. Most American shoppers refuse to purchase brown meat, hence the urgency to sell.

This brown coloration should not be confused with the brown that can indicate spoilage. After opening the package, the meat will return to a pink (oxygenated) state.

For details and the science behind the issue:

http://meatblogger.org...