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Should you cook rice with the lid on or off?

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Monita_photo

Monita is a recipe tester for Food52 and a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 1 year ago

Lid on

Dourmet added over 1 year ago

Thanks for your response, Monita!

karen06 added over 1 year ago

Lid on for me. Bring the water to a boil, lower heat as much as possible, cover tightly for 18-20 minutes. Perfect rice every time.

Dourmet added over 1 year ago

I've never tried lowering the heat, but will do! Thank you!

2007-09-11e-s4
WileyP added over 1 year ago

Agree with Monita. Bring it to a boil, put a lid on it and let it steep for 25 minutes. At my altitude (8,000'), I actually steep it over a very, very, very low flame.

Dourmet added over 1 year ago

Thanks, WileyP!

Dourmet added over 1 year ago

Thanks, WileyP!

Monita_photo

Monita is a recipe tester for Food52 and a trusted source on General Cooking.

added over 1 year ago

Happy to help.

Baci1
HalfPint added over 1 year ago

Both. Bring the rice and water to a boil, simmer uncovered until the water level falls just a bit below the top of the rice. Then cover and lower the heat to it's lowest setting and cook until all the liquid is absorbed by the rice. Fluffy up rice and you're good to go. It's how my mother taught me to make rice on the stovetop.

2007-09-11e-s4
WileyP added over 1 year ago

Welcome, Dourmet - I did mean that at sea level you bring it to a boil, put a lid on it and steep it off the heat for 20-25 minutes or so. I have to keep a bit of heat on because water boils at a mere 197° here.

Good luck!

Waffle3
ChefOno added over 1 year ago
Voted the Best Answer!


You can do it either way -- or a combination of both. For rice to cook, it just has to have sufficient moisture in the pot and be brought up to the temperature at which the starches will gelatinize. If you boil it with excess moisture (here the lid is not necessary but does make for a more efficient use of heat) the grains will remain separate after pouring off the excess cooking liquid. If you're going to eat the rice with chopsticks, you'll want to cook it unrinsed (rinsing removes sticky surface starches) with just the right amount of water, lid on. Notice I said "cook" not "boil"; the rice does not require the excess heat and it makes it far easier to judge the amount of water necessary. It also makes it more difficult to burn the pot and / or the rice. So either no heat or set the burner to its lowest setting. When cooking on an electric cooktop, I like to bring the water to a boil, cover, then move the pot to a back burner set to "warm" to prevents boilovers while the element cools.

Incidentally, leftover rice should be promptly refrigerated. The spores of a certain bacterium (with which the majority of rice is contaminated) can survive the cooking process and germinate as the temperature falls into the danger zone. This is the reason sushi is doused in vinegar and I believe (but have no way of proving) the cause of much if not all of the intestinal discomfort attributed to MSG in Chinese restaurants.

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