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Why does my bread brown on the outside but remain "wet" on the inside?

I have recently restarted baking bread but I noticed even after changing the temperature, the crumb inside remain dense, and wet, sometimes even raw. Any ideas how I can change this for a basic wheat loaf and/or a white loaf (with sun-dried tomatoes?) Thanks!

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Dscn2212

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 1 year ago

My first thought is that you're underbaking it, but many factors contribute to dense bread. If it is underkneaded, the protein structure can't develop properly, so it can't trap pockets of carbon dioxide and then rise. If the top isn't adequately slashed, air can't escape in the heat of the oven. If you could give us your recipe and method you're using, we could probably help you a bit more. The important thing is to persevere!

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Lizziebird added about 1 year ago

Thank you for the help! I have been slashing the top but I wonder if I am baking it at too high a temperature for too short a period or time rather than slow and long. Do you know if 180 C for 30 minutes is too short for a 1/2 lb loaf of traditional whole wheat bread?

Dscn2212

Cynthia is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 1 year ago

I take the temperature of breads, especially those made with whole grain. You want to reach an internal temp of at least 85 degrees C (185 F), and I suspect your baking temp is a bit on the low side. Try 190-200 and see if that give you better results.

New_years_kitchen_hlc_only

AntoniaJames is a trusted source on Bread/Baking.

added about 1 year ago

I've found that both milk/dairy and sugars in a dough can make the crust brown rather quickly, as can certain dark metal baking pans. My convection oven, even when showing exactly the temperature I want, tends to brown all of my breads rather more quickly than other ovens I've used. I often tent the top of my Pullman loaves with foil after about 20 minutes to reduce over-browning on top. Also, are you taking care not to let the outside of the dough dry out while proofing? That can also prevent the dough from rising, resulting in a more dense crumb. And thirty minutes doesn't sound long enough, even for a 1/2 pound loaf. But as Cynthia said, the internal temperature is what matters, and any number of factors could be at play here. ;o)

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