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How to duplicate the soft cut of steak in Thai food?

Hope I can word this question right :)

When we go out for Thai food there is a cut of steak that is soft, not chewy, in thin little strips.

Does anyone know what the trick is ? Is it the cooking method, the cut of steak?
When I buy the kind of steak used in stir fries it tastes good but isn't quite the same.

I appreciate your insight!

Thanks!

Michelle



asked by Michelle church over 1 year ago
9 answers 2004 views
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added over 1 year ago

Have you had any luck with flank steak, grilled, and thinly cut against the grain? I usually use either flank or top sirloin for Thai beef salads.

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added over 1 year ago

Oops...hit send before finishing reply. If you are going for a stir fry, freeze the beef for 30 minutes before slicing. Makes it easier to slice thin. Also, you could also marinate beef in some fish sauce/soy sauce with ginger. My mom (Asian) always believed that soy sauce and ginger tenderized the meat.

Bigpan
added over 1 year ago

I never knew about 'velveting'. I've always used a good marbled cut of beef, sliced, and fried fast enough to still be m/r pink inside. I'll stick with that but will try velveting with pork for some satay skewers.

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added over 1 year ago

I was about to write something about the cornstarch method, too, but I never heard the term "velveting." As I said in a different post, I am of Asian descent so many things we "just did" have terms we've never heard of ha ha. We follow no real specifics order of coating the meat - in fact, sometimes my mother simply sprinkles some soy sauce on the meat and dusts it with cornstarch, and we still get the velvety texture. I suppose that the more familiar a cooking style is, the more liberal one can be with the "pinch of this, pinch of that" method.

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added over 1 year ago

Hi Sam, I have been velveting chicken and beef to replicate my favorite Chinese dishes with great success. Found so many tutorials and blogs about the technique and I'm in love. So a big thank you to you!

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added over 1 year ago

Oftentimes grocery store steaks are portioned in a way that means when you slice it, you're actually slicing with the grain instead of against it. This means chewy meat. Try buying a larger cut of meat and breaking it down yourself. I have never tried it for beef, but when I do chicken sir-frys I marinate the chicken in baking soda for 1 hour before cooking, Rinse off the baking soda before using the meat, It acts as a tenderizer.

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added over 1 year ago

From what I have cooked and read thus far, you don't rinse off the cornstarch. It acts as a seal to keep the protein soft and not used as a tenderizer.