All questions

Have you gone over to cheap knives?

I just noticed that more and more, my go-to knives are the Kuhn Rikon and KAI, lighter weight and cheaper knives. The heavier, more expensive ones don't come out so much anymore. Has anyone else made that transition?

Chris is a trusted source on General Cooking

asked about 1 year ago
7 answers 1157 views
Waffle3
added about 1 year ago


I've never been a fan of the heavy German style. I'm still using my first set of knives which were designed to be light and quick on the board and I've never found any disadvantage to them. When I'm forced to use Wüsthof's and the like, they seem clunky and imprecise in comparison. All my newer knives are Forschner (aka Victornox).

Cheap knives tend to be light, too, but that's an entirely different matter.



Junechamp
ChefJune

June is a trusted source on General Cooking.

added about 1 year ago

That's just because you are not used to that style of knife. I find the lighter weight knives are just that... too light! I'll take my Wusthof any day.

Gobblegobble
added about 1 year ago

I started out with a Wusthof when I got out of school, but since then I've made the transition to a lighter (though not necessarily cheaper) knives : an usuba (Messermeister and MAC) and an Ohishi petty knife and chef's knife. I prefer the thinner handles and lighter weight because I've got small hands, but it really depends on the task. I still use a heavier knife when I need to break down a chicken, or cut through a wheel of parmsesan or split a kabocha in half.

Me_in_munich_with_fish
added about 1 year ago

I love my big, heavy Carter chef's knife. I keep it nice and sharp, and I find that it's equal to pretty much any task, even fine work. But I don't think it's a matter of weight for me--I do like the weight of it, but it's just a great knife. Well-balanced, capable, sharpsharpsharp. I'm sure there are plenty of great lightweight knives out there, though. And, as my mother and grandmothers are proof, even cheap dull knives can get the job done. It's all about what you're used to!

Default-small
added about 1 year ago

Agreed. Knives are like a pair of sneakers. You can borrow them from someone who's the same size as you, but they'll never really be as comfortable as a pair of your own that you've broken in for a couple years.
I prefer a heavier weighted knife with a taller heel because I have big hands and long fingers, but that's me. And personally, price doesn't matter to me. I've used very expensive knives that, for me, were very uncomfortable to work with.

Default-small
added about 1 year ago

Agreed. Knives are like a pair of sneakers. You can borrow them from someone who's the same size as you, but they'll never really be as comfortable as a pair of your own that you've broken in for a couple years.
I prefer a heavier weighted knife with a taller heel because I have big hands and long fingers, but that's me. And personally, price doesn't matter to me. I've used very expensive knives that, for me, were very uncomfortable to work with.

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added about 1 year ago

I'm a knife guy and I own probably close to 100, some quite specialized. These days my preference is for Japanese knives, some are high end while others are cheap ones you can buy in Asian markets. Some are just plain staineless. I have an Italian one that is very light but holds an edge really well. I'm surprised how often I reach for it.
Recently I did a working interview for a sous chef position at a local winery. Tiny kitchen but not that many covers for the day. I was surprised that the kitchen came equiped with Global knives.