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Nancy Harmon Jenkins

Nancy is a food writer, historian, and author of many books, her most recent being The New Mediterranean Diet Cookbook. She also raises olives and makes oil in Tuscany, providing firsthand experience for her forthcoming book about olive oil.

added 12 months ago

Josie, I wouldn't worry too much about marjoram, fresh or dried. It gets a little lost with the horseradish in any case. If you want to substitute another herb, why not thyme, fresh or dried, to offset the pungent horseradish flavor. In general, it's a good idea not to feel put in a box by recipes. They're meant on the whole to be suggestions rather than formulas--the more you cook, the more you'll discover that there are no hard and fast rules, except perhaps for pastry.

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Pegeen

Pegeen is a trusted home cook.

added 12 months ago

As Nancy explains, yes, you can substitute dried herbs for fresh. The rule of thumb I know is to use 1 part dried herbs in exchange for 3 parts fresh herbs. Checking first that the dried herbs aren't old and still have good aroma and flavor when you pinch, smell and taste them.

Zester_003
pierino

pierino is a trusted source on General Cooking and Tough Love.

added 12 months ago

Oregano is a close relative of marjoram and it's one of the few herbs that tastes better dried rather than fresh.